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NEW YORK — New York Federal Reserve President John Williams on Thursday said inflation is still too high but he is confident it will start decelerating later this year. With markets on edge over the direction of monetary policy, Williams offered no clear signs on where he is leaning as far as possible interest rate cuts go. Williams called policy "well-positioned" and "restrictive" and said it is helping the Fed achieve its goals. But higher than expected inflation readings have altered that landscape dramatically, and current pricing is pointing to just one decrease, probably in November. Williams said he expects PCE inflation to drift down to 2.5% this year on its way back to 2% in 2026.
Persons: John Williams, Williams, CNBC's Sara Eisen, Dow Jones Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of New, York Federal, Economic, of New, Fed, Commerce Department Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York, New York, York, of New York
As buy now, pay later programs become more common, some shoppers are using this payment structure to make ends meet. Such short-term financing plans are the second-most-used form of credit payment among consumers in the U.S., according to a new report by NerdWallet. Meanwhile, 25% said they had used BNPL services in the last 12 months. Far fewer consumers had used a cash advance app (10%) or a payday loan (6%) in the last 12 months, NerdWallet found. An equal share, 8%, expect to use BNPL for necessities in the coming 12 months.
Persons: Elizabeth Warren, NerdWallet, Sara Rathner, it's, Rathner Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of New, NerdWallet, Finance Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York, U.S
Wealthy Americans are starting to spend more carefully
  + stars: | 2024-05-19 | by ( Bryan Mena | ) edition.cnn.com   time to read: +7 min
A robust stock market coupled with rising home values have boosted Americans’ wealth from 2019 through 2022, according to a Federal Reserve report on household finances. There’s been some evidence of wealthy Americans growing cautious in the latest round of company earnings results. Federal Reserve officials Michael Barr, Christopher Waller, Philip Jefferson and Raphael Bostic deliver remarks. Federal Reserve officials Christopher Waller, John Williams, Raphael Bostic, Michael Barr, Loretta Mester and Susan Collins deliver remarks. The Federal Reserve release minutes from its May policymaking meeting.
Persons: they’ve, , ” Nanette Abuhoff Jacobson, There’s, ” Jonathan Akeroyd, Moet, The Beverly Hilton, Michael Kovac, LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton, , Jacobson, ’ Ariel Barnes, Barnes, ” Barnes, Baby Boomer, Xers, Matt Egan, Read, Michael Barr, Christopher Waller, Philip Jefferson, Raphael Bostic, John Williams, Loretta Mester, Susan Collins, Robin, Ralph Lauren, Booz Allen Hamilton, Buckle Organizations: CNN Business, Bell, Washington CNN, Federal, Fed, Hartford Funds, CNN, Burberry, The Beverly, The Beverly Hilton Hotel, Walmart, Royal Caribbean Cruises, Jackson State University, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Palo Alto Networks, Urban Outfitters, NVIDIA, National Statistics, National Association of Realtors, Reserve, Intuit, US Labor Department, Chicago Fed, Global, US Commerce Department, Atlanta Fed, Booz, University of Michigan Locations: Washington, British, Americas, Beverly Hills , California, Jackson , Mississippi, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Palo, Ross, Burlington
1 in 7 Gen Z credit card users are ‘maxed out’
  + stars: | 2024-05-17 | by ( Matt Egan | ) edition.cnn.com   time to read: +5 min
CNN —Ariel Barnes plunged into a credit card debt spiral in college, and a decade later she’s yet to escape. Barnes, a manager of gift processing at Jackson State University, has maxed out seven credit cards and is struggling to make minimum payments on $30,000 of credit card debt. Roughly one in seven (15.3%) Gen Z credit card borrowers have maxed out their credit cards, according to new research from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. For instance, the median Gen Z borrower’s credit limit is just $4,500, compared with $16,300 for Millennials and $21,800 for Gen X, the NY Fed said. There’s never a good time to carry a credit card balance, but right now is arguably the worst time.
Persons: CNN — Ariel Barnes, Barnes, ” Barnes, Baby Boomer, Xers, , “ I’ve, Zers, Ted Rossman, Gregory Daco, ” Daco, haven’t, X, it’s, There’s, That’s, Daco, CNN’s Alicia Wallace Organizations: CNN, Jackson State University, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Fed, NY Fed, Bankrate.com, Wall, NY, Federal Locations: Jackson , Mississippi, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
About 86.6% of Hopper users expect to travel this summer, but 72.5% have not booked their trips yet, according to the outlook. "Leaving a balance in your credit card is not necessarily good for your credit score." Plus you're adding to the expense of that purchase, with average credit card interest rates topping 20%. Book summer travel plans soon: The sooner you book your travel plans, the lower the upfront cost will tend to be. You might still have time to book late summer, early fall trips, she explained.
Persons: Klaus Vedfelt, Hopper, Berg, " Berg, Sally French, Cardholders Organizations: Digitalvision, Getty, United Airlines, American Airlines, JetBlue Airways, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Labor Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York, U.S
Americans now owe $1.12 trillion on their credit cards, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reported Tuesday. Keeping up with credit card debt is getting more difficult. "Rent, when you have it, auto loans, utilities, these are all things consumers prioritize ahead of credit cards." As a result, credit card delinquency rates are higher across the board, the New York Fed and TransUnion found. Over the last year, roughly 8.9% of credit card balances transitioned into delinquency, the New York Fed reported.
Persons: Charlie Wise, TransUnion's, Young, Wise, TransUnion, Kassandra Martinchek Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of New, New York Fed, Finance, Fed, Urban Institute Locations: TransUnion, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, , New
Most non-retired adults have some type of retirement savings, but only 36% think their savings are on track. New research from economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York finds that this retirement savings deficit hasn’t made a dent in when Americans plan to exit, or partially exit, the workforce. “The pandemic-induced change in retirement expectations may continue to affect the labor market in years to come,” they wrote. Yes, but: This is a survey of expectations, researchers at the New York Fed are quick to point out. Just because Americans say they plan to shift to part-time work or retire early, it doesn’t mean that they’ll be able to.
Persons: Felix Aidala, Gizem Kosar, Wilbert van der, , They’re, Alicia Wallace, delinquencies, Joelle, CNN’s Parija, Donna Morris, Morris, ” Morris Organizations: CNN Business, Bell, New York CNN, Census, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Social Security, New, Survey, SCE, triannual, Social, Social Security Agency, Lawmakers, New York Fed, Federal Reserve Bank of New, , Public Policy Research, Credit, Walmart, CNN, San Francisco Bay Area Locations: New York, United States, York, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Bentonville , Arkansas, Walmart’s Dallas, Atlanta, Toronto, Bentonville, San Francisco Bay, Hoboken , New Jersey
But economists cautioned that one month of encouraging data was far from enough to set those worries to rest. Both overall and core prices rose 0.3 percent from the previous month, down from 0.4 percent in February and March. The encouraging inflation report on Wednesday is unlikely to change those expectations. The report is also likely to be met with relief at the White House after what has been a rough recent run of inflation data for President Biden. Gasoline prices rose a seasonally adjusted 2.8 percent in April from March.
Persons: , , Stephen Stanley, there’s, Sarah House, Biden, Jerome H, Powell, we’re, Blerina Uruci, Rowe Price, Jeanna Smialek, Jim Tankersley Organizations: Labor Department, Federal Reserve, Santander, White, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Fed Locations: Wells Fargo, Amsterdam, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Over the last year, roughly 8.9% of credit card balances transitioned into delinquency, the New York Fed found. Credit card rates top 20%At the same time, credit cards have become one of the most expensive ways to borrow money. As the federal funds rate rose, the prime rate did, as well, and credit card rates followed suit. "With the Fed likely to keep rates higher for longer, credit card rates should remain high for the foreseeable future," Rossman said. What to do if you're in credit card debt
Persons: Bankrate, Ted Rossman, Rossman Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of New, New York Fed Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York
New data released Tuesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York showed that as household debt balances grew during the first quarter, delinquencies also marched higher. Notably, the percentage of credit card balances in serious delinquency (90 days or more late) climbed to its highest level since 2012. The transitions into delinquency — especially serious delinquency — increased across all debt types, according to the report. Overall household debt grew by 1.1% during the first quarter to $17.69 trillion, according to data that is not adjusted for inflation. Credit card balances dipped (as they typically do post-holidays) by $14 billion to $1.12 trillion.
Persons: delinquencies, Joelle, Delinquencies Organizations: CNN, Federal Reserve Bank of New, , Public Policy Research, New York Fed, Credit Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York, York, New
NY Fed: One-year inflation expectations rise
  + stars: | 2024-05-13 | by ( ) www.cnbc.com   time to read: 1 min
Share Share Article via Facebook Share Article via Twitter Share Article via LinkedIn Share Article via EmailNY Fed: One-year inflation expectations riseCNBC's Steve Liesman joins CNBC's 'Money Movers' to discuss an inflation expectations report from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
Persons: Steve Liesman Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of New Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York
More than a quarter of US metros are still recovering from COVID-era job losses, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reported. Today's job market amplifies fears of another recession, which some experts say could hit as soon as this year. Sign up to get the inside scoop on today’s biggest stories in markets, tech, and business — delivered daily. download the app Email address Sign up By clicking “Sign Up”, you accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy . AdvertisementAs analysts clash over when the next recession will befall the US, large swaths of the country are still bogged down in the previous downturn.
Persons: Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of New, Service, US metros, Business Locations: COVID, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Rust Belt
More than a quarter of US metros are still recovering from COVID-era job losses, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reported. Today's job market amplifies fears of another recession, which some experts say could hit as soon as this year. AdvertisementAs analysts clash over when the next recession will befall the US, large swaths of the country are still bogged down in the previous downturn. The Federal Reserve Bank of New YorkBut this trend is especially distinct in the Northeast, a region that's home to particularly impacted metros. By this indicator, a recession started in October, confirmed further by accelerating job erosion, Danielle DiMartino Booth said.
Persons: , Danielle DiMartino Booth, it's, Frances Donald, Donald, We're, Gary Schilling Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of New, Service, US metros, QI, Bloomberg, Wall Street Locations: COVID, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Rust Belt, California, Hawaii, New Orleans, Honolulu, San Francisco, Cleveland , Detroit, Pittsburgh, Northeast, New York City, New York
That rate of rapid wealth growth has never happened before in the data series' history, per the analysis, and it comes after wealth growth remained relatively stagnant for young Americans pre-pandemic. This data, as the authors of the CAP analysis note, suggests that wealth gains weren't just reserved for the top-earning millennials since both median and average wealth grew. "This suggests that the strong wealth growth for younger Americans is broad-based and not the result of strong growth of a handful of wealthy younger households," the authors write. As that report notes, financial assets were a major component of younger Americans' wealth growing. "We need to keep this robust labor market going and Congress needs to set its sights on younger Americans' greatest affordability challenge: housing," Duke said.
Persons: , Gen X, Brendan Duke, Christian Weller, X, millennials, Duke, BI's Noah Sheidlower Organizations: Service, Center for American Progress, Federal, Business, Boomers, Federal Reserve's Survey, Consumer Finances, millennials, Liberty Street, Federal Reserve Bank of New Locations: millennials, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
More people are looking for a new job, and they have high salary expectations. The lowest average pay people would be willing to accept a new job reached $81,822 as of March, a new series high since 2014. That's according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York's latest consumer expectations survey, which is fielded every four months. But to live comfortably by traditional budgeting advice, the average person needs to earn upwards of $89,000 — closer to the latest data on salary expectations — according to a recent analysis from SmartAsset. And despite a hiring slowdown, ZipRecruiter data shows more companies are actively recruiting to hire for open roles, and they're also extending more counteroffers to keep employees from quitting.
Persons: Julia Pollak Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of New, Labor Department
Those what-ifs could further roil gas and oil prices. But if there’s further conflict, he said, “you’d see a much higher premium for oil prices. If there’s a de-escalation of tensions between Israel and Iran, they said, oil prices should come down over the next few weeks. But if there’s an escalation in conflict, they expect that oil prices could jump to more than $100 per barrel, they wrote in a note Monday. Retail sales rose 0.7% in March from the prior month, a slower pace than February’s upwardly revised 0.9% gain, the Commerce Department reported Monday.
Persons: New York CNN —, JPMorgan Chase, Jamie Dimon, ” Dimon, Jerome Powell, We’ll, Christine Lagarde, Andrew Bailey, Dave Sekera, Israel doesn’t, , , Moody’s, there’s, Chris Isidore, Pete Muntean, Sam Salehpour, Read, Bryan Mena, Claire Tassin Organizations: CNN Business, Bell, New York CNN, Dow, JPMorgan, International Monetary Fund, IMF, Bank, Bank of Canada, Seven, European Central Bank, Bank of England, Morningstar, Nvidia, AMD, Wall Street Journal, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Boeing, Federal Aviation Administration, Alaska Airlines, Commerce Department, Morning, Amazon Locations: New York, Russia, Ukraine, China, United States, Washington ,, Iran, Israel, Federal Reserve Bank of New York
A recent study published in the American Educational Research Journal found that engineering and computer science majors provide the highest returns in lifetime earnings, followed by business, health and math and science majors. Education and humanities and arts majors had the lowest returns of the 10 fields of study considered. "However, there are significant differences across college majors." Overall, the researchers found that the benefits of higher education have held up, even as enrollment has declined and the labor market outcomes for those without a college degree have improved, Zhang said. For workers with a bachelor's degree, education was the lowest-earning field of study, followed by psychology and social work and the arts.
Persons: Liang Zhang, Zhang Organizations: Georgetown University Center, Education, Workforce, Federal Reserve Bank of New, American Educational Research, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture , Education, Human Development, Finance, Ivy League, Georgetown Center, Center Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York
watch nowThe consequences of missed credit card paymentsThe CFPB found that late fees are often layered on top of other punitive measures credit card companies impose on consumers who miss payments, including negative credit reporting, which can hurt their credit rating. "When consumers don't make required payments, they can face a long list of consequences. More consumers are falling behindCollectively, consumers are having a harder time managing debt amid high interest rates and higher prices. Not only are more cardholders carrying debt from month to month but more are also falling behind on payments, recent reports also show. Credit card delinquency rates surged in 2023, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York found.
Persons: Rohit Chopra, Organizations: Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Federal Reserve Bank of New, New York Fed Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Stallard scratched off the $5 ticket in his truck, revealing a “50x” symbol – meaning the listed winning prize on his ticket would get multiplied by 50. “I figured it was going to be $5,” he said, according to a news release from the Kentucky Lottery. “I couldn’t believe it!”He had won the lottery game’s grand prize. Stallard won $150,000 that Friday afternoon, and held onto the winning ticket for the next three days. There are still two $150,000 winning tickets remaining for 50x The Cash lottery game, according to the Kentucky Lottery.
Persons: Charles Stallard, Stallard, , , ” Stallard, I’m Organizations: CNN, Kentucky Lottery, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Federal Reserve, US Locations: Kentucky, Louisville, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, York
Among high-income earners, Gen Z is most confident in their ability to get richer. Gen Z women are particularly confident in their ability to create wealth. The rest of Gen Z may not share this confidence. AdvertisementIt seems the rich are confident that they will be able to build wealth, and the affluent side of Gen Z is no exception. A gender breakdown reveals that 81% of high-net-worth Gen Z women, versus 69% of high-net-worth Gen Z men, expect to see their money grow — a deviation from the overall trend, which saw men more likely to indicate that their money would increase.
Persons: Gen, Knight Frank, Knight Frank's, millennials, Rich millennials Organizations: Liberty Street, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Business Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Uber is going into the Dow Transports on Monday, marking the first change to the index since Dec. 7, 2021, when Old Dominion replaced Kansas City Southern. Under Dow Theory, the Transports should confirm a new high in the Dow Industrials. Uber is a funny add because unlike many of the other index components, it's not really a shipping company. The add likely reflects the Dow Transports index committee's belief that this is a transportation company, even if it just shuttles people instead of packages. This follows a well-known pattern called the S & P inclusion effect.
Persons: Avis, Uber, Stocks, underperform Organizations: Dow Transports, Old Dominion, Kansas City Southern, Dow, Dow Jones Transport, Dow Theory, Transports, it's, Uber, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Union Pacific, CSX, Kirby Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Matson, Old Dominion
Washington, DC CNN —Americans racked up a record amount of credit card debt in 2023, soaring past a trillion dollars. “Consumers still have a lot of money left over to be able to spend, so the credit card data is often misinterpreted,” Russell Price, chief economist at Ameriprise Financial, told CNN. According to a LendingTree analysis of more than 350,000 credit reports, the average unpaid credit card balance was $6,864 in the fourth quarter. Overall, US household debt (including credit card balances) rose to a new high of $17.5 trillion in the fourth quarter, up 1.2% from the prior three-month period. So, while there certainly isn’t a shortage of economic hurdles bedeviling people’s budget — and credit card debt has surged — the big picture indicates that, so far, Americans (and their economy) remain healthy.
Persons: ” Russell Price, Price, haven’t, market’s, ” Gregory Daco, ” Lara Rhame, Laura, Jensen Huang, Christine Lagarde, Virgin, Michael Barr, Raphael Bostic, Susan Collins, John Williams, Papa, Austan Goolsbee, Loretta Mester, fuboTV, Christopher Waller, Mary Daly, Adriana Kugler Organizations: CNN Business, Bell, DC CNN, Workers, New York Fed, Consumers, Ameriprise, CNN, Federal Reserve Bank of New, . New York Fed, Employers, Soaring, FS Investments, Nvidia, Huawei, AMD, Microsoft, Broadcom, US Commerce Department, Central Bank, eBay, Smucker, Urban Outfitters, Global, Board, TJX, Monster Beverage, Baidu, HP, Paramount Global, Anheuser, Busch Inbev, Dell Technologies, Papa John’s, US Labor Department, National Association of Realtors, P, China’s National Bureau, Statistics, Pearson, P Global, Institute for Supply Management, University of Michigan Locations: Washington, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, ., EY, Santa Clara, Singapore, Shenzhen, China, Beijing, CAVA
The share of consumers with "subprime" credit scores who hold a credit card has been "relatively stable," they said. Major credit card issuers got $25 billion in extra interest by raising their average APR margin over the last 10 years, the CFPB estimated. "Higher APR margins have allowed credit card companies to generate returns that are significantly higher than other bank activities." They're among the nation's biggest credit card issuers. How to manage credit card interest
Persons: Martinez, Seikel, Lindsey Johnson, Greg McBride, McBride, That's Organizations: Bank, Getty, Consumer Bankers Association, CBA, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Financial, Discover Financial Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York
Total credit card debt in the U.S. has reached a record high — but people are putting less money toward paying it down. Americans collectively hold $1.13 trillion in credit card debt as of the end of December, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York's latest Household Debt and Credit Report. Debt holders say they put around $363 per month toward their credit card debt in 2023, slightly less than the $430 they paid monthly in 2022. How interest rates and inflation impact credit card debtOne reason people are contributing less is due to record-high credit card interest rates combined with elevated prices for everyday goods, says Matt Schulz, chief credit analyst at LendingTree. Making a plan to get out of credit card debt
Persons: Matt Schulz, Schulz, they've Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of New, LendingTree Locations: U.S, New York, York
US consumers are struggling with soaring credit card debt and rising interest rates. Credit card debt is now at record levels, and interest rates on those cards have soared. AdvertisementOf that total debt, credit card balances are growing the fastest. While this could create a parallel between today's credit card crisis and the mortgage crisis of 15 years ago, there are a few important differences today. AdvertisementStill, the rise in credit card debt and delinquencies could point to cracks in the strength of Americans' spending power.
Persons: Thomas Nitzsche, Gen Z, millennials, Nitzsche, Ginger Chambless, Chambless Organizations: Business, Money Management, MMI, Federal Reserve Bank of New, Federal, JPMorgan Chase, Federal Reserve, Adobe Locations: Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Wells Fargo
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