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Search resuls for: "Kate Wagner"


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While most people follow Zillow Gone Wild to gawk at the weird and bizarre features of other people's homes, some are looking to buy. And with Zillow Gone Wild and a host of other real-estate influencer accounts, a wild home is now easy to find. At the end of April, Leyendecker had a listing in Plymouth, Minnesota, posted on Zillow Gone Wild. Her guests are always amused to discover the home was listed on Zillow Gone Wild. "My husband was a little bit more reserved and nervous about sharing that the house was from Zillow Gone Wild.
Persons: Matt Kugizaki, Nick Levenhagen, Joshua, Nick, Kugizaki, Patrick Hasson, Levenhagen, Levenhagen aren't, Samir Mezrahi, Mezrahi, Kate Wagner, Los Angeles, Los Angeles Dodger Andre Ethier, Nick Leyendecker, Leyendecker, Hasson, Millennials, Ashley Spencer, it's, Spencer, home's, I've, Michelle Mastro, she's Organizations: House, HGTV, Los, Los Angeles Dodger, Homeowners Locations: Joshua Tree , California, Zillow, Gilbert , Arizona, San Luis Obispo , California, Colorado Springs , Colorado, Plymouth , Minnesota, Austin, Minneapolis
America has a serious ugly home problem
  + stars: | 2024-07-02 | by ( James Rodriguez | ) www.businessinsider.com   time to read: +14 min
Recently she posted a video on her YouTube channel in which she phrased the question more bluntly: "Why are homes so 'ugly' now?" Most people agree that America needs more houses, but nobody seems all that thrilled with the ones being built. Related storiesThe blame for America's architectural nightmare, however, doesn't stop at production builders, rising costs, or local codes. Homes look this way because they're not just places where we live — they're also supposed to help us get rich. As they stare down these rising costs, builders and architects have almost no choice but to streamline or opt for cheaper design elements.
Persons: Bailey McInnes, McInnes, they're, James Wentling, John Burns, Peter Dennehy, They're, Dan Reynolds, Horton, Lennar, Kate Wagner, she's, , Wagner, Marcia Straub, William Morgan, it's, Queen Anne Organizations: HGTV, YouTube, Facebook, Builders, Bureau of Labor Statistics, National Association of Home Builders, John Burns Research, Consulting, Harvard's, for Housing Studies, Harvard, The Locations: Northern Virginia, America, homebuilding, Providence , Rhode Island
The Best Place to Drink Is the Emptiest Bar in the City
  + stars: | 2023-06-20 | by ( John Cotter | ) www.nytimes.com   time to read: +4 min
A decade on, I talk about this when I see old friends at hotel bars. It’s the kind of conversation we wouldn’t be able to have at a dark place full of thrum, or a pop-song bar with ironic cocktails. In a leather half-booth, in the emptiest bar in the city, there is no impetus to be decorous. I should clarify that I don’t mean fancy hotel bars — not the Ace, or even the W; not a storied corner like Bemelmans at the Carlyle. Return, for as long as you like, to the quiet place inside yourself that is always arriving, always traveling.
Persons: Carlyle, Hilton, , Kate Wagner, Jen, Sommer, Let’s Organizations: Marriott Locations: cacophony, The Atlantic, polyamory
Housing advocates are debating whether windowless bedrooms are the solution to the housing crisis. Enter windowless bedrooms. Journalist Matt Yglesias argued last year that windowless bedrooms would "save downtowns" by facilitating the mass retrofitting of office buildings into apartments. Supporters argue that building apartments with windowless bedrooms could both help alleviate the severe housing shortage and affordability crisis and repopulate urban business districts. But in recent years, windowless bedrooms have become somewhat normalized on college campuses.
Architecture critic Kate Wagner says Trump's plan to build "freedom cities" is nothing new. There's a whole eco-system of classical architecture proponents on Twitter with Roman statues as their avatars who decry modernism. The order made classical architecture — think columns, marble, symmetry — the preferred style for federal buildings. Wagner says Trump's embrace of classical architecture echoes the right-wing war on modernism that began in the 1980s. "For some reason, there also emerged alongside of those advocates a group of people who started to make statements that people neurologically prefer classical architecture."
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