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Search resuls for: "Claude Trichet"


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watch nowFrench borrowing costs still face a "blowout" over those of Germany, as political and economic reality sets in following the country's parliamentary election, according to veteran investor David Roche. Bond yields move inversely to prices and represent the change in borrowing costs for a government — also indicating long-term investor confidence in the economy. Now, my view is that it will happen," Roche told CNBC's "Squawk Box Europe" on Tuesday. watch nowAlong with economic growth prospects, a key watch-point for investors is France's hefty budget deficit and high debt-to-GDP ratio of 110%. There are about seven major pillars, they suddenly will go absolutely nowhere, which is disastrous for Europe," Roche told CNBC.
Persons: David Roche, Jean, Claude Trichet, , Emmanuel Macron, Roche, CNBC's, shorting, Macron, " Roche Organizations: European Central Bank, CNBC, Quantum, French National Assembly, European Commission, National Locations: Germany, France, Europe, Italy, Ukraine
Share Share Article via Facebook Share Article via Twitter Share Article via LinkedIn Share Article via EmailFormer Bank of France President Trichet: Reasonably confident France will find political solution, no current party can rule aloneJean-Claude Trichet, former Governor of the Bank of France and former president of the European Central Bank, shares his outlook for the French hung parliament and mentions which economic plan he sees as a 'catastrophe' for the country.
Persons: Trichet, Jean, Claude Trichet Organizations: Former Bank of France, Bank of France, European Central Bank Locations: France
ECB's rate hike decision is 'appropriate,' former president says
  + stars: | 2023-06-16 | by ( ) www.cnbc.com   time to read: 1 min
Share Share Article via Facebook Share Article via Twitter Share Article via LinkedIn Share Article via EmailECB's rate hike decision is 'appropriate,' former president saysJean-Claude Trichet, former president of the European Central Bank, says its decision to raise its main rate up by 25 basis points to 3.5% is appropriate "[under] the circumstances."
Persons: Jean, Claude Trichet Organizations: European Central Bank
Unlike much of the past 15 years, euro strength is on the ECB's side as it meets on Thursday. Indeed, ECB President Christine Lagarde and chief economist Philip Lane littered speeches with warning shots about an excessive euro strength when the euro last snarled up to this extent in October 2020. Lagarde's predecessors Mario Draghi and Jean-Claude Trichet similarly weighed in with verbal intervention to cool periodic 10% surges in the trade-weighted euro over its history. Euro strength has built on belated ECB interest rate hikes since July - up some 350 basis points to 3.0% so far and expected to go up at least another 25 bps this week. So should euro strength be finally embraced by ECB as way of slaying the inflation beast?
In this videoShare Share Article via Facebook Share Article via Twitter Share Article via LinkedIn Share Article via EmailFormer ECB President Jean-Claude Trichet weighs in on Credit Suisse and ECB next stepsJean-Claude Trichet, former ECB president, joins 'Squawk on the Street' to discuss the ECB's next steps.
Share Share Article via Facebook Share Article via Twitter Share Article via LinkedIn Share Article via EmailEuropean Central Bank's 50 basis point rate hike was the right call, former ECB president saysJean-Claude Trichet, former president of the European Central Bank, says it made the "right blend" of decisions.
But while the notion of a potential shift in Federal Reserve policy is perfectly reasonable and logical, the word "pivot" - like "transitory" and others before it - should be binned. Shorthand can easily morph into broad-brushed assumptions, leaving traders tied in knots over particular words without really understanding their meaning. When everyone's models are programmed to grab the same word, phrase, or signal, herding behavior and one-way markets can ensue. chartSimilarly, the current obsession on when the Fed will "pivot" away from its most aggressive rate-hiking campaign in 40 years has been perhaps the single biggest driver of financial markets in recent months. chartAvoiding talk of a pivot will reduce the risk of damaging the Fed's credibility in the eyes of some sections of the public and financial markets, as happened with "transitory."
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