Top related persons:
Top related locs:
Top related orgs:

Search resuls for: "for Disease Control"


25 mentions found


Posts shared online claim that vaccinated passengers testing positive for the COVID-19 virus on a cruise ship is an indication that COVID-19 vaccines do not work. Passengers testing positive on a cruise ship that requested they be vaccinated is not proof that the vaccines do not work. In comparison, the COVID-19 vaccines appear to be more effective than the seasonal influenza vaccine, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data here . Fully vaccinated passengers testing positive for the COVID-19 virus on a cruise ship is not proof that the vaccines do not work. COVID-19 vaccines significantly reduce the risk for contracting the virus as well as the risk for severe illness and hospitalization.
Persons: , “ It’s, “ That’s, , BioNTech, Johnson, Read Organizations: Royal, Pfizer, Moderna, Janssen, Food and Drug Administration, FDA, CDC, The Washington, for Disease Control, Reuters Locations: Royal Caribbean, United States, Moderna, COVID
Rumours of airlines discussing a potential ban on vaccinated passengers due to blood clot risks appear to be baseless. “IATA is not aware of any airlines considering denying vaccinated passengers due to the blood clot risk,” Anaelle Ashong, Corporate Communications Assistant at IATA (www.iata.org/en/about/) told Reuters via email. However, flying is not known to increase the vaccine-induced blood clot risk as flying can provoke a different type of blood clot, according to several health experts contacted by Reuters. There is no evidence that airlines met to discuss the blood clot risk for vaccinated passengers. Several medical experts told Reuters there is no evidence to show that flying increases vaccine-induced blood clot risk.
Persons: Anaelle, , Sue Pavord, Haematologist, ” Dr Gregory Poland, Read Organizations: International Air Transport Association, Reuters, “ Airlines, Johnson, AstraZeneca, Corporate Communications, U.S . Centers for Disease Control, Prevention, CDC, Oxford University Hospitals, British Society, Haematology, Mayo
The so-called delta variant of the coronavirus now accounts for nearly 10 percent of new cases in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. The alpha variant was first detected in the United Kingdom, and in April, it became the dominant strain in the U.S.Data for the two-week period ending June 5 predicts that the delta variant accounts for 9.9 percent of cases in the U.S., the CDC said. Still, there is evidence that the vaccines in use in the U.S. are effective against this and other circulating variants. Two doses are required for the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines, while the Johnson & Johnson vaccine requires just one. Because the delta variant is able to spread from person to person more easily, experts say those who have not had the vaccine remain especially vulnerable.
Persons: Johnson, Boris Johnson, Gregory Poland Organizations: Centers for Disease Control, Prevention, Monday, CDC, NBC News, Data, Moderna, Pfizer, Johnson, Public Health, Vaccine Research, NBC, Twitter, Facebook Locations: United States, India, United Kingdom, U.S, Mayo, Rochester , Minnesota
WASHINGTON — Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., apologized Monday for comparing mask-wearing requirements at the Capitol to the Holocaust after visiting the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington. “I have made a mistake and it's really bothered me for a couple of weeks now, and so I definitely want to own it. This afternoon, I visited the Holocaust Museum. The Holocaust is, there's nothing comparable to it...it happened, and, you know, over six million Jewish people were murdered,” Greene said speaking to reporters outside the Capitol Monday evening. Last Friday, the House attending physician, Brian Monahan, issued new guidance for the House of Representatives stating that “fully vaccinated individuals may discontinue mask wear and 6-foot social distance separations” including on the House floor and in committee rooms.
Persons: Marjorie Taylor Greene, , it's, ” Greene, Greene, didn't, , I've, Brad Schneider, Brian Monahan Organizations: WASHINGTON — Rep, Capitol, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Holocaust Museum, for Disease Control Locations: Washington
More than 70% of adult New York residents have received at least one dose of Covid-19 vaccine, a critical milestone in a state that was once the epicenter of the global pandemic. Andrew Cuomo, means that any remaining pandemic-related restrictions—including capacity restrictions and social-distancing rules—will become optional for vaccinated residents starting Tuesday. Unvaccinated people, however, will still need to social-distance and wear a facial covering, and schools will need to follow guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “We’re no longer just surviving,” the governor said Tuesday. “We can get back to living.”The milestone comes six months after a New York nurse received the first Covid-19 vaccine in the state.
Persons: Andrew Cuomo, Organizations: Gov, Centers for Disease Control Locations: York, New York
COVID-19 cases are falling where most people are vaccinated, and vice versa, The Washington Post found. Vaccination rates are lower in southern US states. Coronavirus cases in the US are rising in areas that have lower vaccination rates, a Washington Post analysis found. Vaccination rates are lower in southern states, the data shows. The Post's analysis comes as the US edges near recording 600,000 COVID-19 deaths since the beginning of the pandemic.
Persons: Johnson, Johnson COVID Organizations: Washington Post, Centers for Disease Control, Post, Pfizer, Moderna, CDC Locations: Washington
Explainer: California reopens, mostly, on Tuesday
  + stars: | 2021-06-15 | by ( Jane Lee | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +3 min
A man walks down a street in Encinitas, as California Governor Gavin Newsom said his state would keep its mask order in place for another month, in California, U.S., May 17, 2021. Here is what's changing for California offices, and what's not. Workplace rules are dictated by the California Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board, which has debated keeping restrictions in place longer than the governor. Under the newest proposal, which will be voted on June 17, fully vaccinated office workers won’t need to wear a mask in normal circumstances. Many are waiting until after the Labor Day holiday, on Sept. 7, or even 2022, to reopen offices fully.
Persons: Gavin Newsom, Mike Blake California, what's, Newsom, Francisco’s, Salesforce Organizations: REUTERS, California Occupational Safety, Health, Board, BIG, Tech, Labor, Twitter, Google, Facebook Inc, Apple, U.S . Centers for Disease Control, Thomson Locations: Encinitas, California, U.S, COVID, Silicon Valley, San Francisco , New York, Paris, London
An Atlanta grocery store worker was shot dead after an argument with a customer about a face mask. An Atlanta, Georgia, grocery-store worker was shot dead Monday after a mask dispute with a customer, The Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) said. Preliminary information suggested the customer left the store without making a purchase after getting into an argument about his face mask with the cashier, the GBI said. The customer also shot the security guard in the store, who is a reserve deputy officer for the DeKalb County Sheriff's Office in Atlanta, the GBI said. Maddox said that she understood the topic of face masks was "very sensitive at this time."
Persons: Melody Maddox, Sheriff Maddox, Maddox, Marc Perrone, Larry Barton Organizations: Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Grady Memorial Hospital, DeKalb County Sheriff's, Atlanta Medical Center, for Disease Control, The United Food, Commercial Workers International, University of Central Locations: Atlanta, An Atlanta , Georgia, Georgia, Grady, DeKalb County, University of Central Florida
Congo caps public gatherings as third COVID-19 wave builds
  + stars: | 2021-06-15 | by ( ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.97   time to read: +1 min
African Union President and President of Congo Democratic Republic Felix Tshisekedi speaks during a joint news conference at the end of the Summit on the Financing of African Economies in Paris, France May 18, 2021. Ludovic Marin/Pool via REUTERS//File PhotoThe Democratic Republic of Congo will limit public gatherings to 20 people and close nightclubs as the country grapples with a third wave of COVID-19, President Felix Tshisekedi said on Tuesday. Congo has officially registered relatively few cases, but low vaccination rates have left the country vulnerable to more contagious strains, including the highly-infectious Delta variant. Congo has registered more than 35,000 infections and 834 deaths, according to figures from the Africa Centre for Disease Control. The World Health Organization said on June 2 that COVID-19 cases in Congo were rising exponentially.
Persons: Congo Democratic Republic Felix Tshisekedi, Ludovic Marin, Felix Tshisekedi, Tshisekedi Organizations: Congo Democratic, REUTERS, Democratic, Africa Centre for Disease Control, World Health Organization, Thomson Locations: Congo, Congo Democratic Republic, Paris, France, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kinshasa
Greene came under fire for comparing the House mask mandate to the horrors suffered by Jews in Nazi Germany. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene on Monday evening publicly apologized for her previous comparisons of COVID-19 mask requirements and vaccination efforts to the horrors suffered by Jews in Nazi Germany. Greene's apology comes as House Democrats move to censure her after she likened mask mandates and vaccine rules to the persecution of Jews during the Holocaust. The "gold star" reference, which historians more commonly refer to as a yellow star, was an identifier that Nazi Germany forced Jews to wear. Several House Democrats swiftly condemned Greene's language, followed by House Republican leadership.
Persons: Greene, Marjorie Taylor Greene, it's, I've, Brad Schneider, Nancy Pelosi, Pelosi, Kevin McCarthy Organizations: Georgia Republican, United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Democrats, , for Disease Control, Capitol, House Republican Locations: Nazi Germany, Washington ,, Germany
Five U.S. states had coronavirus infections even before first reported cases -study
  + stars: | 2021-06-15 | by ( ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.77   time to read: +1 min
A protective face mask lays, as the global outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, beside leaves at the lakefront in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., December 6, 2020. REUTERS/Shannon/File PhotoJune 15 (Reuters) - At least seven people in five U.S. states were infected with the novel coronavirus weeks before those states reported their first cases, a new government study showed. Samples from participants in Illinois were collected on Jan. 7 and Massachusetts on Jan. 8, suggesting that the virus was present in those states as early as late December. "This study allows us to uncover more information about the beginning of the U.S. epidemic," said Josh Denny, one of the study authors. Reporting by Mrinalika Roy in Bengaluru; Editing by Anil D'SilvaOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Josh Denny, Mrinalika Roy, Anil D'Silva Organizations: REUTERS, for Disease Control, National Institutes of Health, Thomson Locations: Chicago , Illinois, U.S, United States, Illinois , Massachusetts , Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Illinois, Massachusetts, Bengaluru
The US death toll from COVID-19 has passed 600,000, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. But some vaccine hesitancy and procrastination is posing a threat to reaching herd immunity. The US reached a grim new milestone Tuesday: The nation's known death toll from COVID-19 surpassed 600,000, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. No other country has reported more COVID-19 deaths, and scientists say the true death toll is most likely higher than official reports. In any case, vaccine hesitancy has posed a challenge to reaching herd immunity in the US.
Persons: , Joe Biden, Johnson, hesitancy Organizations: Johns Hopkins University ., US, Johns Hopkins University, Centers for Disease Control, Pfizer, Gallup, COVID, NBC, Transpiration Locations: COVID, . New York
Deaths in the U.S. have been slowing for months, according to Johns Hopkins University data, due largely to an aggressive campaign to vaccinate the nation's elderly and medically vulnerable people who are most at risk of dying from Covid. Covid vaccines by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna were authorized by the Food and Drug Administration for emergency use in December, followed Johnson & Johnson's in February. The U.S. has recorded more Covid cases than any other country in the world — about 33.5 million cases, according to data compiled by John Hopkins University. Globally, there have been more than 176 million cases recorded, and more than 3.8 million deaths. Pfizer's Covid vaccine was given emergency approval for adolescents last month.
Persons: Johnson Organizations: Wood, Johns Hopkins University, Centers for Disease Control, Healthcare, United Memorial Medical Center, Johns Hopkins University . Deaths, Pfizer, BioNTech, Moderna, Food and Drug Administration, Johnson's, U.S, John Hopkins University, Globally Locations: Brooklyn , New York, U.S, Covid, United, Houston , Texas, India
New York will lift most of its Covid-19 restrictions now that 70% of all adults in the state have been vaccinated with at least one dose, Gov. On Sunday, the seven-day positivity rate across the state was 0.41%, down from a high of 7.9% on Jan. 4. Every region of the state has a positivity rate below 1%. Before the pandemic, the unemployment rate in New York state was 3.9%. Cuomo said the state will lift capacity restrictions, social distancing, hygiene protocols, health screenings, some contact tracing and more.
Persons: Andrew Cuomo, Cuomo, Joe Biden Organizations: Centers for Disease Control, CDC Locations: New York City . New York, New York, United States, New York City, U.S
New York governor lifts remaining COVID-19 restrictions
  + stars: | 2021-06-15 | by ( ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.86   time to read: +1 min
A commuter receives a shot of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) during the opening of MTA's public vaccination program at a subway station in the Brooklyn borough of New York City, New York, U.S., May 12, 2021. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/File PhotoJune 15 (Reuters) - New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Tuesday he is lifting all state-mandated coronavirus restrictions after reporting that 70% of New York adults have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. "It is an important milestone, and we're going to keep pushing to do more," Cuomo told a news conference, adding that the state would continue to encourage more New Yorkers to get vaccinated. Cuomo, whose state in the early stages of the pandemic last year was at the center of the COVID-19 public health crisis in the United States, also said individuals and businesses could still choose to adopt some precautions. Reporting by Maria Caspani, Editing by Chizu NomiyamaOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Johnson, Brendan McDermid, Andrew Cuomo, Cuomo, Maria Caspani, Chizu Organizations: REUTERS, U.S . Centers for Disease Control, Thomson Locations: Brooklyn, New York City , New York, U.S, New York, United States
CDC now calls coronavirus Delta variant a 'variant of concern'
  + stars: | 2021-06-15 | by ( Jen Christensen | ) edition.cnn.com sentiment -0.99   time to read: +1 min
(CNN) The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now calls the Delta variant of the novel coronavirus, also known as B.1.617.2, a "variant of concern." Vaccines, treatments and tests that detect the virus may also be less effective against a variant of concern. Previously, the CDC had considered the Delta variant to be a variant of interest. The World Health Organization classified the Delta variant as a variant of concern on May 10. A study on the Delta variant in Scotland published on Monday found that it was associated with about double the risk of hospitalization compared with the Alpha variant, B.1.1.7, that was first identified in the UK.
Organizations: CNN, US Centers for Disease Control, CDC, World Health Organization, Alpha, Read Locations: India, Scotland
The White House is planning to host a cookout for more than 1,000 first responders, essential workers, and military personnel on Independence Day. While COVID-19 cases and deaths have dropped steadily as a result of widespread vaccination, the country still hasn't met the administration's goals. The US is set to narrowly miss Biden's goal to have at least 70% of adults partially vaccinated by July 4. The White House is planning a cookout for more than 1,000 first responders, essential workers, and military personnel and their families on the South Lawn on Independence Day. The US is set to narrowly miss Biden's goal to have at least 70% of adults partially vaccinated by July 4.
Persons: hasn't, Joe Biden, Biden, there's Organizations: Independence, Associated Press, Centers for Disease Control Locations: America, Vermont, Hawaii
Mucorymycosis has been seen in patients with particularly severe cases of COVID-19. The fungal infection has a high mortality rate, requiring the removal of infected tissue. Doctors in Oman have encountered at least three COVID-19 patients with "black fungus," the AP said. Doctors in Oman, a small nation on the Arabian Peninsula, have encountered at least three COVID-19 patients with "black fungus," the Associated Press reported Tuesday. As Insider has reported, black fungus has a 50% mortality rate "and requires all infected tissues to be removed for patients to have a fighting chance."
Persons: Mucorymycosis Organizations: AP, Associated Press, US Centers for Disease Control, CDC Locations: Oman, India
U.S. Nears 600,000 Virus Deaths Despite Progress From Vaccines
  + stars: | 2021-06-15 | by ( Dan Levin | Julie Bosman | ) www.nytimes.com sentiment -0.99   time to read: +1 min
“We’re approaching a sad milestone — almost 600,000 lost lives because of Covid-19 in America,” Mr. Biden said. It is the remaining unvaccinated population — some people who are refusing vaccines, others who have not gotten around to vaccination yet — that is driving the lingering deaths, experts say. “Until we have this under control across the world, it could come back and thwart all the progress we’ve made so far,” said Dr. Marcus Plescia, the chief medical officer for the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, which represents state health agencies. Older white people are driving the shifts in death patterns, and across most age groups, Black people saw the smallest decrease in deaths compared with other large racial groups. Cumulative vaccination rates among Black and Hispanic people continue to lag behind those of Asian and white people.
Persons: , ” Mr, Biden, who’ve, , Marcus Plescia, “ I’m Organizations: Association of State, Territorial Health Officials, Centers for Disease Control, New York Times Locations: America, India, South America, Covid, United States
Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, a New York Democrat, said Monday that he plans to reintroduce a bill aimed at improving sexual orientation and gender identity data collection in violent crimes and suicides. It's also difficult to take steps to prevent it, as government data collection is often used to guide funding and resource allocation. "The LGBTQ Essential Data Act would help deliver much-needed data that we can use to prevent violent deaths and save young LGBTQ lives." Four states — New York, California, Oregon and New Jersey — and Washington, D.C., have narrower laws that require LGBTQ-inclusive data collection in some areas other than hate crimes. Maloney's bill would authorize $25 million in funding to help the CDC expand data collection.
Persons: Sean Patrick Maloney, , " Maloney, Maloney, Joe Biden, hasn’t, Biden, It's, Sam Brinton, Trevor, Brinton Organizations: New, New York Democrat, Centers for Disease Control, NBC News, Human, HRC, Democratic, D.C, NBC, Twitter, Facebook Locations: New York, New York , California , Oregon, New Jersey, Washington, Los Angeles County
Between 1992 and 2017, heat stress injuries killed 815 U.S. workers and seriously injured more than 70,000, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Overall, more than 65,000 people visit the emergency room for heat-related stress a year and about 700 die from heat, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While heat affects workers across a range of industries, U.S. farmworkers are 20 times more likely to die from illnesses related to heat stress than workers overall, the CDC said. “This legislation will require OSHA to issue a heat standard on a much faster track than the normal OSHA regulatory process. But without a specific standard, workers have no recourse to address heat exposure, said Rachel Licker, a senior climate scientist with the nonprofit organization Union of Concerned Scientists.
Persons: , Oscar Londoño, Bobby Scott, OSHA’s, Rachel Licker, , ” Allison Crittenden, Londoño, Jose Delgado, Erick Sanchez Jose Delgado, Delgado, I’ve Organizations: Workers, Occupational Safety, Health Administration, Centers for Disease Control, CDC, Public Citizen, OSHA, Department of Labor, NBC News, University of Washington, U.S, Rep, Union of Concerned, American Farm Bureau Federation, U.S . Department of Agriculture Locations: Homestead , Florida, Florida, U.S, California , Oregon, Washington, Miami, Dade County, Homestead
A 15-year-old girl was killed after she was struck by lightning while swimming in the waters encircling Tybee Island, Georgia, authorities said Sunday. Her family told investigators that she was visiting Tybee Island from Alabama, authorities said. Although rare, lightning is a major cause of storm-related deaths in the U.S., according to the National Weather Service. Lightning kills an average of 49 people across the country each year, including hundreds more injured, according to the NWS. The odds of being struck by lightning is one in 500,000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Organizations: Tybee Island Police Department, National Weather Service, Lightning, NWS, Centers for Disease Control Locations: Georgia, Alabama, Tybee, U.S
The Maryland-based biotech company Novavax reported Monday that its experimental Covid-19 vaccine is safe and 100 percent effective against moderate to severe disease. The company has already completed a Phase 3 trial in the U.K., but the U.S. trial results are required to apply for emergency use authorization in this country. The Novavax vaccine is given in two doses, 21 days apart. The Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines all work by providing genetic instructions for the body to build the coronavirus's spike protein, which the immune system learns to recognize and fight. The Novavax vaccine can be stored in standard refrigerator temperatures.
Persons: Novavax, Biden, Joe Biden, William Schaffner, Dr, David Hirschwerk, Robert Wood Johnson, Julie Morita, Morita, Johnson Organizations: Food and Drug Administration, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, for Disease Control, Alpha, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Chicago Department of Public Health, NBC, Trump, FDA, Johnson, Pfizer, BioNTech, Moderna, CDC, Twitter, Facebook Locations: Maryland, U.S, Mexico, Nashville , Tennessee, Manhasset , New York, Brazil, South Africa, India, Moderna
A woman holds a small bottle labeled with a "Coronavirus COVID-19 Vaccine" sticker and a medical syringe in front of displayed Novavax logo in this illustration taken, October 30, 2020. Additionally, the two-dose vaccine was found to be 100% effective in preventing moderate and severe disease and 93% effective against some variants, Novavax said. The new data comes as federal officials say the U.S. has more than enough doses of Covid vaccines to finish vaccinating the entire American population. It's possible the U.S. could end up donating doses of the Novavax vaccine. Novavax said Monday it remains on track to reach manufacturing capacity of 100 million doses per month by the end of the third quarter and 150 million doses per month by the fourth quarter of 2021.
Persons: Novavax, Dr, Gregory Glenn, Johnson, Biden Organizations: Biotech, Food and Drug Administration, Alpha, FDA, Pfizer, BioNTech, Moderna, Johnson, Centers for Disease Control, U.S, White House, Defense, AstraZeneca, Sanofi, Novavax Locations: United States, Mexico, U.S
Novavax said its coronavirus vaccine was 90% effective at preventing COVID-19. The biotech company Novavax said on Monday that its coronavirus vaccine succeeded in a final-stage clinical trial, demonstrating 90% efficacy at preventing COVID-19. It remains to be seen how the Novavax vaccine will be used in the US immunization campaign. Among the most vulnerable population — including older people and those with frequent exposure to the virus — Novavax's vaccine was 91% effective. Despite the uncertainty surrounding its use in the US, Novavax's COVID-19 vaccine program has been a remarkable and unlikely success story.
Persons: Novavax, Stanley Erck, Johnson, AstraZeneca's, Read, Rhonda Flores, Andrew Caballero, Reynolds, Novavax's, Bill Gates Organizations: Moderna, Pfizer, BioNTech, Centers for Disease Control, pharma, US Food and Drug Administration, AFP, Coalition for Locations: COVID, Mexico, Maryland, South Africa, Gaithersburg , Maryland
Total: 25