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WASHINGTON — A long-delayed bill to provide financial support to U.S. government personnel believed to be suffering from Havana Syndrome is headed to President Joe Biden’s desk after the House passed it Tuesday. NBC News reported that diplomats affected by Havana Syndrome voiced frustration over continuing challenges in getting medical care and benefits in a tense hourlong conversation with Secretary of State Antony Blinken this month. The first incidents of the syndrome “medically confirmed” by the U.S. government were in Havana in 2016 and 2017. Many U.S. workers thought to be suffering from Havana Syndrome reported hearing a loud sound and feeling pressure in their heads. For years, those who have come forward reporting potential Havana Syndrome have complained about immense bureaucratic hurdles to getting proper medical care.
Persons: WASHINGTON, Joe Biden’s, Biden, Sen, Susan Collins, , Collins, Jeanne Shaheen, Democrat Mark Warner of Virginia, Republican Marco Rubio, Antony Blinken, Blinken, Kamala Harris ’, William Burns, Rubio, ” Rubio Organizations: American, Neurological, White, Senate Intelligence, Democrat, Republican, NBC News, Havana Syndrome, CIA, State Department, U.S, NATO, National Academies of Science Locations: U.S, Havana, HAVANA, Maine, Republican Marco Rubio of Florida, Cuba, China, Vietnam, India, Western Europe, Austria, Germany, Russia
Khatibzadeh spoke as Iran's new foreign minister, Hossein Amirabdollahian, was in New York for the annual U.N. General Assembly, where he was expected to discuss reviving the nuclear deal with other governments. Iran has refused to meet with U.S. negotiators in the nuclear talks; Washington and Tehran must pass messages through European intermediaries, instead. All parties must stay true to the nuclear deal," Raisi said in a recorded speech by video. The monitoring regime was introduced as part of the 2015 nuclear deal. The U.S. will discuss how to proceed with Iran in talks with European allies and other world powers in New York on Wednesday.
Persons: Saeed Khatibzadeh, IRNA, Khatibzadeh, Hossein Amirabdollahian, Ebrahim Raisi, Trump, Donald Trump, Joe Biden, We're, Biden, Raisi, Antony Blinken Organizations: Foreign Ministry, General Assembly, European Union, Iranian, U.S, Biden, U.S ., U.K, General, ., Capitol, Trump, International Atomic Energy Agency, . Security Locations: WASHINGTON, Iran, Vienna, Tehran, Iranian, New York, France, Germany, U.S, Washington, China, Russia, Afghanistan, Australia
In his first meeting with the cohort of State Department staffers affected in Cuba and China, Blinken spent more than an hour offering reassurances and fielding questions, with most affected staffers joining remotely by phone. “It's confounding and puzzling to everyone who works on this that we have not been able to determine the cause or attribution,” the senior State Department official said. Diplomats have bristled at the fact the FBI did not directly interview the diplomats affected. On the Sept. 10 call, when Blinken asked how the department could reduce the skepticism, at least one diplomat encouraged the State Department to publicly refute that report. “The FBI study is one I have actually read,” she told the diplomats, according to notes from the call.
Persons: Antony Blinken, Blinken, “ It's, they’re, , , Trump, Biden, “ That's, , Kamala Harris, William Burns, Pamela Spratlen, Spratlen Organizations: WASHINGTON –, State Department, NBC, Havana Syndrome, State Department’s Bureau of Medical Services, Pentagon, National Intelligence, NBC News, CIA, U.S, White House National Security Council, FBI, Diplomats Locations: WASHINGTON, WASHINGTON – U.S, Havana, Cuba, China, U.S, Vietnam, India,
Factbox: An intensifying arms race in Asia
  + stars: | 2021-09-21 | by ( ) www.reuters.com   time to read: +6 min
Navy/Handout via REUTERSSept 21 (Reuters) - Analysts warn that Asia may be sliding into an accelerating arms race as countries react to China's military growth. read moreBefore the decade is out, the Asia Pacific will have more next-generation missiles that fly farther and faster, hit harder, and carry increasingly sophisticated technology — the product of a potentially dangerous arms race. In 2020, the U.S. government approved the potential sales of 100 Boeing-made Harpoon Coastal Defense Systems, three weapons systems including missiles, sensors and artillery, and four sophisticated aerial drones to Taiwan. read moreSOUTH KOREAIt successfully tested a conventional submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) on Sept. 15, becoming the first country without nuclear weapons to develop such a system. Last year, it developed the Hyunmoo-4 missile, which has an 800 km range and can mount a 2-ton payload.
Persons: Burke, Nicholas Huynh, Moon Jae, Kim Jong, Hyonhee Shin, John Mair, Ben Blanchard, Miyoung Kim, Gerry Doyle Organizations: Royal Australian Navy, U.S . Navy Amphibious, Arleigh, . Navy, REUTERS, Ship, Hornet, U.S . State Department, Boeing Co, Boeing, Coastal Defense Systems, NORTH, Lockheed, Thomson Locations: Ticonderoga, South China, Asia, AUSTRALIA, United States, Britain, Australia, TAIWAN, U.S, Taiwan, Washington, KOREA, Korea, NORTH KOREA, Korean, North Korea, Pyongyang, CHINA, China, JAPAN, Japan, Seoul, Sydney, Taipei
Central American migrants cross the border between Mexico and Guatemala, after being expelled by U.S. and Mexican officials, in El Ceibo, Guatemala August 15, 2021. Some of the migrants stuck in Tapachula entered Mexico illegally while others are seeking asylum. Mexican officials argue much of the chaos stems from the dismantling of asylum protections under former U.S. President Donald Trump, and during the coronavirus pandemic. To discourage migration, over the summer the United States started sending flights of detained migrants into southern Mexico, including Tapachula. Lopez Obrador says he wants the migrants to remain in southern Mexico, arguing those who go north risk falling foul of criminal gangs.
Persons: Luis Echeverria TAPACHULA, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Joe Biden, Jairo Gonzalez, Gonzalez, Lopez Obrador, Mexico's, Donald Trump, Biden's, Alejandro Diaz, Derisma, they're, Dave Graham, Frank Jack Daniel, Alistair Bell Organizations: U.S, REUTERS, Central, Migration Institute, Human Rights Watch, U.S . Department of Homeland Security, White, State Department, Commission, Refugee Assistance, Thomson Locations: Mexico, Guatemala, El Ceibo, U.S, South, Tapachula, Del Rio , Texas, Guatemalan, Nicaraguan, Mexico City, United States, Chiapas, Washington, United
LONDON — The family of a 19-year-old British motorcyclist has reached a resolution with the U.S. State Department employee who fatally struck him with her car two years ago, the latest development in a case that touched off diplomatic tensions between Britain and the United States. A spokesman for the family of the teenager, Harry Dunn, said the two parties had reached an agreement in a lawsuit filed by the family. “It’s a milestone for us that we’ve achieved a resolution in the civil case,” the spokesman, Radd Seiger, said. “We can now look forward and focus on the criminal case, which we are very confident is coming soon.” He declined to disclose any details of the settlement. Anne Sacoolas, the American State Department employee, had been driving on the wrong side of the road in August 2019 near the village of Croughton, in central England, when she hit Mr. Dunn, who died at a hospital shortly after the accident.
Persons: Harry Dunn, we’ve, Radd Seiger, , Anne Sacoolas, Dunn Organizations: U.S . State Department, American State Department Locations: Britain, United States, Croughton, England
Almost five years after the internment campaign began, relatives interviewed by Reuters say such requests have fallen on deaf ears. China denies it has hampered efforts by relatives to find information on detained relatives. China’s foreign ministry declined to comment on its policies on communicating with overseas relatives of people detained in China, and referred Reuters to Xinjiang authorities. Of the eight relatives of detained Uyghurs Reuters spoke to, six were based in the United States, all of whom said appeals to the Chinese embassy in Washington went unanswered. Some relatives say China’s public attempts to discredit Uyghur claims of rights abuses have become a key way to learn more about their relatives detained in Xinjiang.
Persons: Sen, Chris Coons, Rushan Abbas, Gulshan Abbas, Leah Millis, Ziba Murat, Ronald Reagan, Murat, Abbas, , , Zulhayat Ismayil, China hasn't, Rayhan Asat, Ekpar Asat, Ekpar, Asat, Rayhan, I’d, Cate Cadell, Lincoln Organizations: Western Hemisphere, Transnational, Civilian Security, Human, Foreign Ministry, REUTERS, Ronald Reagan Washington National, Reuters, Hudson Institute, . State Department, International Visitor, Harvard, Harvard University, , FedEx, Embassy, Thomson Locations: East Asia, The, Xinjiang, Washington , U.S, Leah Millis URUMQI, China, Ronald Reagan Washington, Washington, Beijing, United States, Urumqi, Artux, Kazakh, Aksu, , U.S
Venezuela's Defence Minister Vladimir Padrino speaks during a news conference in Caracas, Venezuela January 11, 2021. General Vladimir Padrino said in a statement that a Colombian Air Force drone flew over the Venezuelan border state of Zulia on Monday afternoon. Padrino in June spoke out against a visit by Faller to the Colombian city of Puerto Carreno near the Venezuelan border. The United States maintains a broad Venezuela sanctions program that was created to force Maduro from power. Reporting by Vivian Sequera, writing by Brian Ellsworth; Editing by Cynthia OstermanOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Vladimir Padrino, Manaure Quintero, Admiral Craig Faller, Padrino, Faller, Puerto Carreno, Nicolas Maduro, Ivan Duque's, Vivian Sequera, Brian Ellsworth, Cynthia Osterman Organizations: Venezuela's, REUTERS, U.S, Colombian Air Force, Monday, United States Southern Command, Twitter, Colombia's Air Force, U.S . State Department, United, Thomson Locations: Caracas, Venezuela, Manaure Quintero CARACAS, Colombian, Venezuelan, Zulia, Colombia, Puerto, United States
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin speaks during a news conference to announce the Trump administration's restoration of sanctions on Iran, at the U.S. State Department in Washington, U.S., September 21, 2020. Patrick Semansky/Pool via REUTERS(Reuters) - Steve Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs executive who served as U.S. Treasury secretary during the Trump administration, has raised $2.5 billion at his private equity firm, according to a Bloomberg News report here on Monday. Mnuchin started hiring staff for an investment fund that would seek backing from Persian Gulf State funds, the Washington Post first reported in here, citing people familiar with the plans. Prior to joining Trump’s administration, Mnuchin spent 17 years at Goldman Sachs before leaving in 2002, when he launched Dune Capital Management. As a Hollywood financier, he also made investments in movies such as “Avatar”, “Mad Max: Fury Road” and “Suicide Squad”.
Persons: Steve Mnuchin, Patrick Semansky, Goldman Sachs, Trump, Mnuchin, , Max Organizations: Treasury, Trump, U.S . State Department, REUTERS, Reuters, Goldman, Bloomberg, Washington D.C, Liberty Strategic Capital, Saudi Arabia’s Public Investment Fund, Strategic, Mnuchin, Cybereason, Persian Gulf, Washington Post, Capital Management Locations: Iran, Washington , U.S, cybersecurity, Persian Gulf State, Hollywood
U.S. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin speaks during a news conference to announce the Trump administration's restoration of sanctions on Iran, at the U.S. State Department in Washington, U.S., September 21, 2020. Patrick Semansky/Pool via REUTERSSept 20 (Reuters) - Steve Mnuchin, a former Goldman Sachs (GS.N) executive who served as U.S. Treasury secretary during the Trump administration, has raised $2.5 billion at his private equity firm, according to a Bloomberg News report on Monday. Mnuchin started hiring staff for an investment fund that would seek backing from Persian Gulf State funds, the Washington Post first reported inFebruary, citing people familiar with the plans. Prior to joining Trump's administration, Mnuchin spent 17 years at Goldman Sachs before leaving in 2002, when he launched Dune Capital Management. As a Hollywood financier, he also made investments in movies such as "Avatar", "Mad Max: Fury Road" and "Suicide Squad".
Persons: Steve Mnuchin, Patrick Semansky, Goldman Sachs, Trump, Mnuchin, Max, Sohini, Shinjini Organizations: Treasury, Trump, U.S . State Department, Bloomberg, Washington D.C, Liberty Strategic Capital, Saudi Arabia's Public Investment Fund, Strategic, Mnuchin, Cybereason, Persian Gulf, Washington Post, Capital Management, Thomson Locations: Iran, Washington , U.S, cybersecurity, Persian Gulf State, Hollywood, Bengaluru
Members of a local election commission count ballots at a polling station inside Kazansky railway terminal after polls closed during a three-day long parliamentary election in Moscow, Russia September 19, 2021. REUTERS/Evgenia NovozheninaWASHINGTON, Sept 20 (Reuters) - Russia prevented citizens from exercising their civil and political rights in recent elections and the United States does not recognize the Russian Duma elections on sovereign Ukrainian territory, the State Department said on Monday. "The September 17-19 Duma elections in the Russian Federation took place under conditions not conducive to free and fair proceedings," State Department spokesman Ned Price said in a statement. "We do not recognize holding elections for the Russian Duma on sovereign Ukrainian territory and reaffirm our unwavering support for the territorial integrity and sovereignty of Ukraine." Reporting by Doina Chiacu and Lisa Lambert; Editing by Franklin PaulOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Novozhenina, Ned Price, Doina Chiacu, Lisa Lambert, Franklin Paul Organizations: REUTERS, Russian Duma, State Department, Russian Federation, Department, Franklin Paul Our, Thomson Locations: Moscow, Russia, Novozhenina WASHINGTON, United States, Russian, Ukrainian, Ukraine
U.S Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks during a news conference at the State Department in Washington, U.S., September 16, 2021. Andrew Harnik/Pool via REUTERSMEXICO CITY, Sept 20 (Reuters) - The United States said on Monday it had put Guatemala's attorney general and five Salvadoran Supreme Court judges on a list of "undemocratic and corrupt" officials, in a sign of the Biden government's frustration with Central American authorities. U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken announced the move on Twitter, saying a top aide of Guatemalan Attorney General Consuelo Porras was also on the list, which adds to growing U.S. concerns about efforts to tackle graft in both countries. El Salvador's President Nayib Bukele, who has a strained relationship with Washington, responded on Twitter saying: "It's clear the list has NOTHING to do with "corruption", it's pure politics and the lowest kind of interference." Bukele questioned why no Salvadoran opposition figures were on the list, or anyone from the Honduran government.
Persons: Antony Blinken, Andrew Harnik, Biden, Consuelo Porras, Nayib Bukele, Bukele, Chris Reese Organizations: State Department, MEXICO CITY, United, Salvadoran, Central, U.S, Twitter, Guatemalan, El, Supreme, Mexico City, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, MEXICO, United States, El, Washington, Honduran
Over a dozen prominent Democratic elected officials have been accused of hypocrisy after flouting official guidance for containing COVID-19. Mayors, governors, and members of Congress have come under scrutiny for traveling and attending indoor gatherings. Few Democratic politicians have attended anything comparable to the now-infamous late September nomination ceremony for Justice Amy Coney Barrett at the White House that became a coronavirus superspreader. But many have contradicted their own guidance or even official rules they issued aimed at preventing the transmission of COVID-19. The only possible conclusion is that they just don't care," New York Post columnist Karol Markowicz, who has kept a running tally of politicians defying COVID-19 restrictions and guidance on Twitter, wrote in a December column.
Persons: Muriel Bowser, Donald Trump, Mike Pompeo's, Amy Coney Barrett, Karol Markowicz Organizations: Democratic, Congress, State Department, Liberal, York, Twitter Locations: Washington, COVID
WASHINGTON — A commercial flight carrying 21 Americans and 48 lawful permanent U.S. residents departed Kabul, Afghanistan, over the weekend, the State Department confirmed Monday. In total, at least 85 American citizens and 79 lawful permanent residents have left Afghanistan since the U.S. ended a massive humanitarian evacuation and completed the withdrawal of its troops in August, according to State Department figures. "We are thankful to Qatari authorities, who continue to coordinate these flights with the Taliban," State Department spokesman Ned Price said Monday. The Biden administration is still working to help American citizens, lawful permanent residents and vulnerable Afghans leave, Price added. Secretary of State Antony Blinken told lawmakers last week that approximately 100 U.S. citizens are still seeking evacuation from Afghanistan.
Persons: WASHINGTON, Ned Price, Biden, Price, Antony Blinken, Blinken, Trump, Joe Biden Organizations: State Department, Department, U.S, Pentagon Locations: Kabul, Afghanistan, U.S, Kabul's
The State Department will consult with the Department of Homeland Security and Congress to lift the cap, which was set at 62,500 for the 2020 fiscal yearending this month, the statement said. The plan to dramatically increase refugee admissions comes at a time when tens of thousands of Afghan refugees are on U.S. military bases awaiting resettlement in the United States. Biden, a Democrat, who took office in January, promised to reverse course after his predecessor Republican President Donald Trump cut the refugee cap to just 15,000, the lowest level in the history of the modern refugee program. Biden initially left that level in place, but backtracked in the face of criticism from immigration advocates. Asylum seekers can present themselves to border agents and claim fear of return, triggering a long U.S. court process.
Persons: Joe Biden disembarks, Elizabeth Frantz WASHINGTON, Joe Biden's, Biden, Donald Trump, Mica Rosenberg, Lisa Lambert, Kristina Cooke, David Gregorio Our Organizations: Marine, White, REUTERS, State Department, The State Department, Department of Homeland Security, Democrat, Republican, Washington D.C, Thomson Locations: Rehoboth Beach , Delaware, Washington , U.S, United States, U.S, Mexico, Texas, New York, Washington, San Francisco
WASHINGTON — President Biden intends to increase to 125,000 the number of refugees who can enter the United States in the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, the State Department announced on Monday, making good on his campaign pledge to do so. The people in those groups are not officially classified as refugees. But the move indicates the president’s intention to open the country’s doors after four years in which the Trump administration sought to prevent refugees from settling here. In May, Mr. Biden raised the refugee admissions cap for the current fiscal year from 15,000 — an historically low level set by former President Donald J. Trump — to 62,500. At the time, Mr. Biden also vowed to make good on his promise to increase the cap to 125,000 for the first full fiscal year of his presidency.
Persons: Biden, Trump, Mr, Donald J Organizations: WASHINGTON, State Department Locations: United States, Kabul, Afghanistan
(A spokesman later called to say Mr. Blinken wasn’t trying to take full credit for evacuations.) Mr. Blinken also said the United States was still trying to bring out more Afghan journalists, particularly those who have worked for Voice of America and other media outlets funded by the U.S. government. Several people at those organizations confirmed that account, though they spoke on the condition of anonymity because they are still trying to get other journalists out of Afghanistan. Many Afghan journalists who worked for media outlets funded by the U.S. government, including Radio Free Europe, also had to make other arrangements. “The U.S. government has yet to fulfill its commitment to evacuate vulnerable Afghan journalists,” Mr.
Persons: Blinken, Hamid, Blinken wasn’t, Jamie Fly, , Fly Organizations: Airport, State Department, of, U.S ., The Times, The Washington Post, CBS News, NBC News, ABC News, NPR, CNN, Protect Journalists, Radio Free Locations: United States, Afghanistan, American, Radio Free Europe, U.S
DEL RIO, Texas — The U.S. plans to speed up its efforts to expel Haitian migrants on flights to their Caribbean homeland, officials said Saturday as agents poured into a Texas border city where thousands of Haitians have gathered after suddenly crossing into the U.S. from Mexico. Crowd estimates varied, but Val Verde County Sheriff Frank Joe Martinez said Friday that there were about 13,700 new arrivals in Del Rio. Migrants pitched tents and built makeshift shelters from giant reeds known as carrizo cane. About 500 Haitians were ordered off buses by Mexican immigration authorities in the state of Tamaulipas, about 120 miles (200 kilometers) south of the Texas border, the state government said in a news release Friday. Mexico has agreed to take in expelled families only from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, creating an opening for Haitians and other nationalities.
Persons: Val Verde County Sheriff Frank Joe Martinez, , ” Stephen Miller, Donald Trump's, Biden Organizations: DEL RIO, The Department of Homeland Security, U.S, Associated Press, . Customs, Ciudad, , Val Verde County Sheriff, Migrants, DHS, U.S . State Department, South Locations: DEL RIO , Texas, U.S, Caribbean, Texas, Mexico, Del Rio, United States, San Antonio, Ciudad Acuña, , Eagle, Val Verde County, carrizo, Haiti, Tamaulipas, South America, Rio de Janeiro, Darien, Panamanian, Trump, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador
CANBERRA, Australia — Australia has made a "huge" diplomatic error, the French ambassador said on Saturday having been recalled to Paris after Canberra ditched a multibillion dollar order for French submarines in favor of an alternative deal with the United States and Britain. Before he was recalled, French envoy Thebault said he found out about the U.S. submarine deal from the Australian media. Australia said it regretted the recall of the French ambassador, and that it valued the relationship with France and would keep engaging with Paris on other issues. Payne and Defense Minister Peter Dutton are currently in the United States for annual talks with their U.S. counterparts and their first with President Joe Biden’s administration. “The impact on our relationship with France is a concern, particularly as a country with important interests in our region,” Dreyfus said.
Persons: Jean, Pierre Thebault, Thebault, David Gray, Marise Payne, Payne, Peter Dutton, Joe Biden’s, Ned Price, France's, Mark Dreyfus, ” Dreyfus, , Morrison, Organizations: Australia —, Canberra, France's Naval Group, U.S, Foreign Affairs, State Department Locations: CANBERRA, Australia, Australia — Australia, Paris, United States, Britain, Canberra, U.S, China, Pacific, France, French, South
French Ambassador in charge of the G7 summit preparations Jean-Pierre Thebault speaks on his mobile phone while working in Biarritz, France August 25, 2019. Ludovic Marin/Pool via REUTERSMELBOURNE, Sept 18 (Reuters) - Australia has made a "huge" diplomatic error, the French ambassador said on Saturday having been recalled to Paris after Canberra ditched a multi billion dollar order for French submarines in favour of an alternative deal with the United States and Britain. Australia said it regretted the recall of the French ambassador, and that it valued the relationship with France and would keep engaging with Paris on other issues. L4N2QJ3JIU.S. State Department spokesperson Ned Price said that France was a 'vital ally' and that the United States would be engaged in coming days to resolve the differences. The row marks the lowest point in relations between Australia and France since 1995, when Canberra protested France's decision to resume nuclear testing in the South Pacific and recalled its ambassador for consultations.
Persons: Pierre Thebault, Ludovic Marin, Jean, Thebault, Marise Payne, Ned Price, France's, Lidia Kelly, Simon Cameron, Moore Organizations: REUTERS, Canberra, France's Naval Group, U.S, Foreign Affairs, U.S . State Department, Thomson Locations: Jean, Biarritz, France, REUTERS MELBOURNE, Australia, Paris, United States, Britain, Canberra, French, U.S, South
The context surrounding General Milley’s actions is unclear and may be exculpating. And the authors of “Peril” are unlikely to know whether the Chinese general “took the chairman at his word,” although they assert it. There are also other potential explanations for General Milley’s actions less salacious than the Woodward and Costa telling accounts for. But the problem runs deeper than the specifics of General Milley’s actions and signals trouble for the relationship between our military and the civilians it is intended to serve. A phone call between General Milley and Nancy Pelosi, the speaker of the House, was reported several months ago as General Milley explaining to the person second in the line of succession to the presidency the legal procedures for the president to initiate nuclear war, something valuable to reaffirm.
Persons: Mark Milley, Bob Woodward, Robert Costa, , Jennifer Griffin, , Woodward, Costa, Milley, Nancy Pelosi Organizations: Joint Chiefs of Staff, United, Fox News, State Department Locations: United States, China, American, Washington
"Just like Afghanistan, this new 'America First' opus is poorly conceived and even more poorly executed," a French diplomat said. David Bell, a history professor at Princeton University, said precedent indicated the crisis would blow over, eventually. "Macron is trying to reawaken that Gaullist tradition of French independence" in foreign policy, he said. "China must be laughing all the way to the bank," said Francois Heisbourg, senior advisor for Europe at the International Institute for Strategic Studies. Even so, other analysts believe the compelling need to counter Beijing will help Western countries bridge their differences.
Persons: Joe Biden, Scott Morrison, Boris Johnson, Tom Brenner WASHINGTON, Antony Blinken, Joe Biden's, Donald Trump's, Biden, Emmanuel Macron, Benjamin Haddad, Blinken, Paris, Washington, David Bell, Macron, Francois Heisbourg, Heisbourg, Josep Borrell, Greg Poling, Humeyra Pamuk, David Brunnstrom, Steve Holland, Heather Timmons, Mike Stone, Mary Milliken, Daniel Wallis Organizations: National Security, Australian, British, White, REUTERS, U.S, French, Trump, Australia's, Atlantic Council's, White House and State Department, The State Department, United Nations General Assembly, Princeton University, NATO, Bell, International Institute for Strategic Studies, Beijing, European Union, Washington's Center, Strategic, International Studies, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, Paris, Europe, Australia, Washington, France, Britain, U.S, Afghanistan, French, Iraq, China, United States, Germany, EU, Beijing
'DUPLICITY'Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian later described the row as a "crisis" in France's relations with the United States and Australia. U.S. State Department spokesperson Ned Price said France was a "vital ally" and that the United States would work in the coming days to resolve the differences. Australia said it regretted the recall of the French ambassador and that it valued the relationship with France and would keep engaging with Paris on other issues. Thebault said he was very sad to have to leave Australia but added there "needs to be some reassessment" of bilateral ties. "But there was a real contract and I think there was an alliance and a friendship between Australia and France.
Persons: Jean, Pierre Thebault, Yves Le Drian, Read, Ned Price, Biden, Marise Payne, Thebault, France's, Emmanuel Macron, Louis Maman, Lidia Kelly, Stefica Nicol Bikes, Gus Trompiz, Ardee Napolitano, Gareth Jones, David Clarke Organizations: Canberra, France's Naval Group, Malaysian, France's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, France, . State Department, Foreign Affairs, SBS, Australia, Thomson Locations: France French, Australia, U.S, Malaysia, Pacific, MELBOURNE, PARIS, United States, Britain, Canberra, China, France, NATO, Washington, Beijing, South China, Paris, Quai, Europe, French, South
In France, the immediate reaction to the decision was swift and angry. French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian speaks during joint press conference in Weimar, Germany, on Sept. 10, 2021. "The decision itself was a big blow for industry in France,” she said, with the country losing out on a $40 billion deal. In the end, the U.S. did not provide details to France of the deal until hours before the announcement. "I don't what it will be, but there is first the lack of trust ... with the most involved European country in the Indo-Pacific."
Persons: Joe Biden’s, Donald Trump, Biden, Georgina Wright, Jean, Yves Le Drian, , Jens Schlueter, Frédéric, Wright, hadn't, Charillon, Antony Blinken, Michael B Zingaro, Blinken, Peter Dutton's, Dutton, Admiral Patrick Chevallereau, attaché, Chevallereau Organizations: Europe, Institut Montaigne, NBC, French, Australia, Trump, France's Clermont Auvergne University, Capes, NBC News, Joint Base, Hickam, U.S . Navy, AP, Pacific, Australian Defense, U.S, NATO Locations: Australia, China, France, Britain, U.S, Europe, Paris, United States, Weimar, Germany, France's, Washington, ” The Virginia, Illinois, America, Afghanistan
CAIRO — Within days of each other, the United States and Egypt announced moves this week that, for the first time in years, would put human rights on the agenda in Egypt, a country that has become notorious for jailing activists, targeting journalists and squashing free speech. On Tuesday, the State Department notified Congress that it was withholding $130 million in military aid until Egypt meets specific human rights benchmarks. Biden administration officials said it was the first time that a secretary of state had refused to issue a formal national security waiver to provide the aid. Three days earlier, President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi of Egypt announced a new human rights strategy, laying out a plan to protect human rights for the first time in his seven years in power, apparently in response to international pressure.
Persons: Abdel Fattah el Organizations: State Department, Congress, Biden Locations: CAIRO, United States, Egypt
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