Top related persons:
Top related locs:
Top related orgs:

Search resuls for: "Scott Patterson"


11 mentions found


In nine public hearings, the House committee pressed the case that Donald Trump was at the center of an effort to reverse the 2020 election results. WASHINGTON—The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol is racing to finalize its long-awaited report, which it expects to release to the public in December, and make decisions about possible recommendations of criminal charges to the Justice Department. The report, based on more than 1,000 interviews, extensive videos of the attack and millions of documents, will be the final summation of the committee’s year-and-a-half investigation, and could include a criminal referral to the Justice Department for former President Donald Trump and allies of his who aided his attempt to overturn the 2020 presidential election result, committee members have said.
WASHINGTON—The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riot issued a subpoena to Donald Trump on Friday, setting the stage for a tense standoff between lawmakers and the former president. The subpoena requested that Mr. Trump appear on Nov. 14 for deposition testimony in Washington or by videoconference, and for the production of documents by Nov. 4.
Welcome to a special edition of WSJ’s politics newsletter looking at the latest hearing by the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol attack. To receive our weekday edition and future special editions, sign up here. Three Questions for WSJ’s Scott PattersonWSJ: What did we learn from Thursday’s House select committee hearing?
WASHINGTON—House lawmakers plan a wide-ranging look Thursday at former President Donald Trump’s efforts to reverse the 2020 election results, in what could be the final public hearing of the select committee investigating the Capitol riot before the midterm elections. The committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol will focus its hearing, which starts at 1 p.m. EDT, on Mr. Trump’s state of mind, committee aides said. The panel will also examine “ongoing threats to democracy that persist to this day,” a committee aide said.
Jan. 6 Committee Votes to Subpoena Donald Trump
  + stars: | 2022-10-13 | by ( Scott Patterson | ) www.wsj.com   time to read: 1 min
WASHINGTON—The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the Capitol voted Thursday to issue a subpoena to former President Donald Trump for testimony and documents, a move that marked a significant escalation of the panel’s probe. “We want to hear from him,” Rep. Bennie Thompson (D., Miss. ), chairman of the committee, said in closing remarks, referring to Mr. Trump. “It is our obligation to seek Donald Trump’s testimony…A subpoena to a former president is a serious and extraordinary action.”
WASHINGTON—The House select committee investigating the attack on the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, will focus its hearing Thursday on former President Donald Trump’s state of mind as the panel begins to make its closing argument that he orchestrated a wide-ranging attempt to overturn the 2020 presidential election, committee aides said. Since its most recent hearing in late July, the panel has received thousands of documents from the Secret Service and interviewed new witnesses, including several members of Mr. Trump’s cabinet. Documentary evidence will include information from hundreds of thousands of pages the Secret Service presented to the committee after it subpoenaed the agency in July, according to committee aides.
WASHINGTON—As the hearings on the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riot wind down and the House select committee investigating the violence and former President Donald Trump’s actions turns toward writing a final report, here is a look at some of the most significant disclosures and allegations. The summer hearings featured testimony from mostly top Republican officials in federal and state governments, and in Mr. Trump’s own administration, who told the committee about a campaign by the former president to pressure them to reverse election results. While some evidence of the efforts to overturn the election was known before the hearings, the testimony included new details about the extent of the effort and how members of his own cabinet believed Mr. Trump had lost the election to Democrat Joe Biden but struggled to convince him.
The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the Capitol is set to reconvene its next live hearing Wednesday, putting the finishing touches on its case that former President Donald Trump was at the center of a plan to overturn the 2020 presidential election. Since its last hearing in late July, the panel has continued to interview witnesses, collect documents and seek out new evidence about the months-long effort to overturn the election. Committee members said that as the eight summer hearings were wrapping up, new witnesses were coming forward to provide information.
The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol plans a ninth hearing Wednesday after holding a series of eight public hearings over the summer. The hearings aim to show that former President Donald Trump set the stage for his supporters’ riot by making baseless allegations of election fraud and trying to pressure federal and state officials to stop President Biden’s win. Mr. Trump has said he did nothing wrong and continues to make his unsubstantiated claim that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from him.
WASHINGTON—The House passed legislation Wednesday that would overhaul the way Congress counts and ratifies presidential elector votes, responding to efforts by former President Donald Trump and his supporters to try to overturn the 2020 election results. The 229-203 vote in favor of the Presidential Election Reform Act in the House will set up a showdown with the Senate, where a bipartisan group of lawmakers has proposed a similar bill to overhaul the 1887 Electoral Count Act, albeit with some key differences. The Senate legislation already has public support from 10 Republican senators, enough to overcome the chamber’s 60-vote filibuster threshold, if all 50 members of the Democratic caucus vote yes.
Journal Reports: Energy
  + stars: | 2022-04-25 | by ( Benoît Morenne | Jackie Snow | Bart Ziegler | ) www.wsj.com   time to read: 1 min
There’s a lot of hype and confusion about carbon-free energy sources. Here’s a look at five of them: how much they produce, what they cost, and what obstacles they face.
Total: 11