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Search resuls for: "Samantha Pearson"


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ROSÁRIO OESTE, Brazil—President Jair Bolsonaro lost his bid for reelection last month, but his right-wing movement continues to grow. That is largely owing to Brazil’s evermore powerful and prosperous farming belt, where Chinese demand for commodities in recent years has enriched towns in Brazil’s central savannah and fortified conservative states economically and politically.
SÃO PAULO—The Inter-American Development Bank elected Brazil’s Ilan Goldfajn on Sunday as president of Latin America’s largest development bank, the first Brazilian to hold the role in the institution’s 63-year history. The election of Mr. Goldfajn, a widely respected former central banker, comes at a time when the region depends ever more on the institution as it emerges from the Covid-19 pandemic that killed over 1.7 million people in Latin America and the Caribbean and plunged millions more into poverty.
SÃO PAULO—Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro on Tuesday vowed to respect the constitution after he lost the presidential election to Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , ending a tense silence of 45 hours in which he had refused to acknowledge the results even as his allies urged him to do so. Mr. Bolsonaro didn’t comment on his loss in Sunday’s runoff vote in a press conference in Brasília, the capital. His chief of staff, Ciro Nogueira, flanking Mr. Bolsonaro in the briefing, told reporters that the president had authorized him to begin the transition process that would end with Mr. da Silva’s inauguration on Jan. 1.
SÃO PAULO—Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva evoked fond memories of his heady two terms in office in the 2000s when commodity prices were soaring, poverty was plunging and Brazil was optimistically seen as a country of the future. “The people will eat steak and drink beer again…they will be happy again,” Mr. da Silva told supporters in the campaign that ended with Sunday’s victory over President Jair Bolsonaro , who has yet to concede or comment on the results.
SÃO PAULO—Voters who swept Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva back into the presidency Sunday fondly recall his last heady two terms in office in the 2000s when commodity prices were soaring, poverty was plunging and Brazil was finally seen as the country of the future. “The people will eat steak and drink beer again…they will be happy again,” Mr. da Silva told supporters in the campaign that ended with Sunday’s victory over President Jair Bolsonaro , who has yet to concede or comment on the results.
BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil—Brazilians cast their ballots Sunday in what political scientists see as the country’s most consequential election in decades—a choice between President Jair Bolsonaro and his leftist rival, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , that will have widespread implications for Latin America’s biggest economy and the Amazon rainforest. Mr. da Silva, the standard-bearer for the Latin America left, and Brazil’s conservative incumbent are statistically tied in some recent polls. In May, Mr. da Silva had a lead of more than 20 percentage points over Mr. Bolsonaro, but is currently ahead by less than 1 percentage point, according to a recent poll. That is within the margin of error and a technical tie.
SÃO PAULO—Brazil’s leftist former president, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva beat conservative incumbent Jair Bolsonaro in the country’s closest presidential race in history Sunday, cementing Latin America’s shift to the left and marking an extraordinary comeback for a man who was in jail for corruption three years ago. After a marathon of campaign rallies in the poorest corners of the country to appeal to voters hungry for a return to Brazil’s more prosperous past, Mr. da Silva, who last presided over Brazil from 2003 to 2010, clinched 60 million votes to secure 50.9% of the electorate to 49.1% for his rival in the runoff, with 99.5% of the votes counted, electoral authorities reported.
Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, who has promised to boost spending on the poor, is slightly ahead of his rival in recent polls. SÃO PAULO—If Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva wins Brazil’s election this weekend, it would mark a major political comeback for the ex-president, who was convicted five years ago on money-laundering and corruption charges, signaling that voters are focused mainly on economic issues. Sunday’s vote pits Mr. da Silva, a longtime standard-bearer for the Brazilian left whose criminal convictions were later annulled, against conservative President Jair Bolsonaro in a campaign that has focused on rising unemployment, mounting inflation and pandemic policies. Recent opinion polls show Mr. da Silva, who has promised to boost spending on the poor, ahead by about 5 percentage points.
RIO VERDE, Brazil—Toiling on the dusty plains of central Brazil, Edilamar Caetano and her husband had long been loyal supporters of Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , the leftist front-runner in next month’s presidential elections whose own family worked the land as farmhands. In April, President Jair Bolsonaro , the former army captain who took office four years ago promising fiscal restraint and a smaller state, came to town. He gave Ms. Caetano and her husband, Wagner Vieira, a title to 84 acres they had been farming as squatters, delivering the paperwork personally with an awkward hug in a local ceremony.
Food & Services News
  + stars: | 2022-09-12 | by ( Alistair Macdonald | Karolina Jeznach | Rachel Wolfe | ) www.wsj.com   time to read: 1 min
TechThe grocery-delivery company is one of the few companies in Silicon Valley moving toward a public listing in what may be one of the slowest years for IPOs in decades.
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