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Central American migrants cross the border between Mexico and Guatemala, after being expelled by U.S. and Mexican officials, in El Ceibo, Guatemala August 15, 2021. Some of the migrants stuck in Tapachula entered Mexico illegally while others are seeking asylum. Mexican officials argue much of the chaos stems from the dismantling of asylum protections under former U.S. President Donald Trump, and during the coronavirus pandemic. To discourage migration, over the summer the United States started sending flights of detained migrants into southern Mexico, including Tapachula. Lopez Obrador says he wants the migrants to remain in southern Mexico, arguing those who go north risk falling foul of criminal gangs.
Persons: Luis Echeverria TAPACHULA, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Joe Biden, Jairo Gonzalez, Gonzalez, Lopez Obrador, Mexico's, Donald Trump, Biden's, Alejandro Diaz, Derisma, they're, Dave Graham, Frank Jack Daniel, Alistair Bell Organizations: U.S, REUTERS, Central, Migration Institute, Human Rights Watch, U.S . Department of Homeland Security, White, State Department, Commission, Refugee Assistance, Thomson Locations: Mexico, Guatemala, El Ceibo, U.S, South, Tapachula, Del Rio , Texas, Guatemalan, Nicaraguan, Mexico City, United States, Chiapas, Washington, United
Burundi grenade blasts kill five, health worker says
  + stars: | 2021-09-21 | by ( ) www.reuters.com   time to read: +2 min
Five people were killed and about 50 injured, a health worker helping to care for the injured told Reuters on Tuesday. Like the witnesses, the health worker asked for anonymity for fear of reprisals for talking to media. A man in a bus hit by a grenade explosion said it killed at least three people including a woman. An airport worker confirmed there had been an attack on the Bujumbura airport on Saturday. Congo-based rebel group Red Tabara claimed responsibility for the airport attack in a statement on Twitter.
Persons: Red Tabara, Burundians, Giles Elgood Organizations: Reuters, Police, Gitega, United Nations General Assembly, Human Rights Watch, United Nations, Nairobi, Thomson Locations: NAIROBI, Burundi's, Bwiza, Congo, New York, Burundi
KIGALI, Rwanda — A Rwandan court on Monday found Paul Rusesabagina, a one-time hotel manager portrayed as a hero in a Hollywood film about the 1994 genocide, guilty of being part of a group responsible for terrorist attacks. "They should be found guilty for being part of this terror group — MRCD-FLN," judge Beatrice Mukamurenzi said of 20 defendants including Rusesabagina. The case has had a high profile since Rusesabagina, 67, was arrested last year on arrival from Dubai after what he described as a kidnapping by Rwandan authorities. Since being portrayed by actor Don Cheadle as the hero of the 2004 film "Hotel Rwanda", Rusesabagina emerged as a prominent critic of President Paul Kagame, based in the United States. His supporters say he was kidnapped; the Rwandan government suggested he was tricked into boarding a private plane.
Persons: Paul Rusesabagina, Beatrice Mukamurenzi, Don Cheadle, Rusesabagina, Paul Kagame, Prosecutors, Cheadle, Oscar, Kagame, Rwandan Organizations: Rwanda —, Rwandan, NBC, Rights Watch Locations: KIGALI, Rwanda, Dubai, United States, Rwandan, Kigali
Paul Rusesabagina, the man who was hailed a hero in a Hollywood movie about the country's 1994 genocide is detained and paraded in front of media in handcuffs at the headquarters of Rwanda Investigation Bureau in Kigali, Rwanda August 31, 2020. REUTERS/Clement UwiringiyimanaKIGALI, Sept 20 (Reuters) - A Rwandan court is expected to rule on Monday in the case of Paul Rusesabagina, a one-time hotel manager portrayed as a hero in a Hollywood film about the 1994 genocide, later accused by Rwanda's authorities of masterminding terrorism from exile. Rusesabagina, 67, denies all the accusations and says he was kidnapped from Dubai this year to be put on trial. His supporters call the trial a sham, and proof of President Paul Kagame's ruthless treatment of political opponents. Rusesabagina's trial began in February, six months after he was arrested on arrival in Kigali on a flight from Dubai.
Persons: Paul Rusesabagina, Clement Uwiringiyimana, Paul Kagame's, Rusesabagina, Don Cheadle, Oscar, Kagame, Rwandan, Katharine Houreld, Peter Graff Organizations: Rwanda Investigation, REUTERS, Rwandan, Prosecutors, Rights Watch, Thomson Locations: Rwanda, Kigali, Clement Uwiringiyimana KIGALI, Dubai, United States, Rwandan
Paul Rusesabagina, the man who was hailed a hero in a Hollywood movie about the country's 1994 genocide is detained and paraded in front of media in handcuffs at the headquarters of Rwanda Investigation Bureau in Kigali, Rwanda August 31, 2020. REUTERS/Clement UwiringiyimanaKIGALI, Sept 20 (Reuters) - A Rwandan court on Monday found Paul Rusesabagina, a one-time hotel manager portrayed as a hero in a Hollywood film about the 1994 genocide, guilty of being part of a group responsible for terrorist attacks. "They should be found guilty for being part of this terror group - MRCD-FLN," judge Beatrice Mukamurenzi said of 20 defendants including Rusesabagina. Since being portrayed by actor Don Cheadle as the hero of the 2004 film "Hotel Rwanda", Rusesabagina emerged as a prominent critic of President Paul Kagame, based in the United States. His supporters say he was kidnapped; the Rwandan government suggested he was tricked into boarding a private plane.
Persons: Paul Rusesabagina, Clement Uwiringiyimana, Beatrice Mukamurenzi, Don Cheadle, Rusesabagina, Paul Kagame, Prosecutors, Cheadle, Oscar, Kagame, Rwandan, Katharine Houreld, Peter Graff Organizations: Rwanda Investigation, REUTERS, Rwandan, Rights Watch, Thomson Locations: Rwanda, Kigali, Clement Uwiringiyimana KIGALI, Dubai, United States, Rwandan
An Israeli student seeking asylum in the UK says he'll be made to commit 'apartheid' in Israel. The 21-year-old ultra-Orthodox Jewish rabbinical student is appealing a previous asylum claim rejected in December last year, according to Middle East Eye (MEE). "Our client is attempting to prove his case in the context of Israel operating as an apartheid state," Ansari told MEE. Conscientious objectors in Israel are not uncommon, but it is the first time the UK has handled an Israeli asylum case on this basis, according to MEE. Fahad told MEE that there have been forcible conscriptions of students like his client during this time.
Persons: he'll, Fahad Ansari, MEE, Ansari, Fahad Organizations: Service, Jewish, Riverway, Al, Rights Watch, West Bank, Guardian, The Locations: Israel, Israeli, Manchester, Al
REUTERS/Baz RatnerSummary Thousands of Eritrean refugees caught in north Ethiopian warRefugees distrusted and abused by both sides' fighters'Clear war crimes' committed, says rights groupNAIROBI, Sept 16 (Reuters) - Eritrean soldiers and Tigrayan militias raped, detained and killed Eritrean refugees in Ethiopia’s northern region of Tigray, an international rights watchdog said on Thursday. Tens of thousands of Eritrean refugees live in Tigray, a mountainous and poor province of about 5 million people. Tigrayan forces marched fleeing refugees back to Hitsats, shooting some stragglers, refugees reported to HRW. In the northernmost camp, Shimelba, Eritrean forces killed at least one refugee, raped at least four others and killed local residents, HRW said. Tigrayan forces took over those camps in June and refugees have reported killings and looting.
Persons: Baz Ratner, Tigrayans, Laetitia Bader, Horn, Getachew Reda, PEOPLE, HRW, Tigrayan, Ziban, Adi Harush, Mai Aini, Andrew Cawthorne Organizations: REUTERS, Refugees, Ethiopian, Eritrean, Human Rights Watch, Reuters, International, UNHCR, United Nations, HRW, Thomson Locations: Tigray, Sudan, NAIROBI, Ethiopia’s, of Africa, Africa, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Hitsats, Hitsats camp’s, Zelasle, Shimelba, Mai
Demonstrators attend a protest against a decision restricting abortion rights in Warsaw, Poland, January 29, 2021. REUTERS/Aleksandra Szmigiel/File PhotoBRUSSELS, Sept 16 (Reuters) - Poland must change its legal definition of rape to better protect women, Europe's top rights watchdog said on Thursday in the latest challenge to the country's ruling nationalists over human rights and democratic values. read moreThe Council of Europe said Warsaw should increase efforts to combat sexual violence, including by changing the definition of rape to "move away from a force-based definition to one covering all non-consensual sexual acts." Of 17 states analysed so far, only three - Belgium, Malta and Sweden - penalise sexual violence on the grounds of lack of consent alone. Should it find the reasoning faulty, it can tell Poland to make specific amends or sue Warsaw at the top EU court.
Persons: Aleksandra Szmigiel, Gabriela Baczynska Organizations: REUTERS, Justice, European Union, EU, European Commission, Warsaw, Family, Social, Thomson Locations: Warsaw, Poland, BRUSSELS, Europe, Istanbul, Belgium, Malta, Sweden, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania
Spain and Belgium, for instance, offer group homes where immigrants receive social work support and have their basic needs met while pursuing immigration status. A Salvadoran woman staying in Belgium told me she’d headed there because she knew from friends and family what awaited her in the States. Still, even through the Trump years, the United States employed other alternatives to detention that could be instituted easily and swiftly at scale. As of August, roughly 117,000 people were enrolled in Alternatives to Detention. They would probably still be alive today had they been released into an alternative program.
Persons: me she’d, , , Obama, Trump Organizations: , Management, Niskanen, ICE, Government, Office, Human Rights Watch Locations: Spain, Belgium, Sweden, Salvadoran, States, U.S, United States
Victims' families, their lawyers and human rights groups say many of the deaths are driven by heavy-handed policing. Investigations into the death of six other protesters, including Cristhian, are still in an initial stage of inquiries, the attorney general's office said. "The military justice system lacks independence and has a long record of covering, rather than investigating, abuses in Colombia," said Jose Miguel Vivanco, Americas director at Human Rights Watch. He said Vargas has pushed for better human rights standards this year and delicate cases would be handled by the police's top internal investigator. The police will ask the advice of the U.N. to help strengthen its human rights policies and work toward open communication with communities, the new police director of human rights, Luis Alfonso Novoa, said in a statement on Wednesday after taking up his post.
Persons: Luisa Gonzalez SOACHA, Carolina Hurtado, Cristhian, Cristhian Hurtado, Javier Ordonez, Ivan Duque's, Duque, Jorge Vargas, general's, Vargas, Maria Elena, Temblores, Jose Miguel Vivanco, Fabio Espitia, Luis Alfonso Novoa, Dilan Cruz, Ordonez, , Juan Lloreda, Santiago Murillo, Milena Meneses, Oliver Griffin, Daniel Flynn, Julia Symmes Cobb, Rosalba O'Brien Organizations: REUTERS, United Nations, European Union, Reuters, Twitter, Investigations, Colombian, Police, Defense Ministry, Human Rights Watch, Thomson Locations: Bogota, Colombia, Carolina, Americas, Ibague
The Taliban will allow around 200 U.S. and other foreign citizens to leave Afghanistan on a flight to Qatar scheduled to take off from Kabul on Thursday, two sources familiar with the matter have told NBC News. They added that it was unclear how many of those set to leave were American. The planned departure — the first international passenger flight to leave Kabul — comes amid growing fears for those who have been left behind in Afghanistan in the wake of the United States' chaotic withdrawal. Wali Sabawoon / APTaliban spokesperson Zabihullah Mujahid told NBC News that the militant group would not stand in the way of anyone looking to leave Afghanistan, so long as they have valid travel documents. President Joe Biden said last week that 100 to 200 Americans "with some intention to leave" were still stranded in Afghanistan.
Persons: Kabul —, Wali Sabawoon, Zabihullah Mujahid, Biden, Joe Biden, Nemat Naqdi, Taqi Daryabi, Marcus Yam, Patricia Gossman, Clark, Wang Yi Organizations: NBC, Reuters, AP, NBC News, State Department, Los Angeles Times, Getty, Human Rights Watch, World Health Organization, WHO, Chinese Foreign Locations: Afghanistan, Qatar, Kabul, Doha, United States, U.S, Mazar, welts, Asia, China
One key problem, experts argue, was overlooked corruption and human rights abuses at senior levels. One expert told Insider that when it came to Afghanistan, the US and its allies were "choosing the least bad partner." Patricia Gossman, a senior Human Rights Watch researcher who has interviewed Afghans and international officials and conducted on-the-ground investigations in Afghanistan, told Insider that problems such as human rights abuses and corruption were "a big factor" in the country's fall. Afghan leaders within the government, military, and police have been accused of crimes ranging from corruption to murder, rape, torture, and war crimes. "It affected the legitimacy of the government," Gossman, who has spent years documenting human rights abuses in Afghanistan, told Insider.
Persons: Sami Sadat, Afghanistan's, Patricia Gossman, Gossman, Ryan Crocker, Obama, Mohammed Fahim, Fahim giggled, Crocker, Fahim, Ashraf Ghani's, Asadullah Khalid, Abdul Rashid Dostum, Abdul Raziq, Scott Olson, Dan Quinn, Quinn, Sarah Chayes, Chayes, Erol Yayboke, Yayboke Organizations: Service, NATO, US, New York Times, Rights, National Directorate of Security, Human Rights Watch, Afghan National Police, U.S, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, Afghan National Army, ANA, US Army, US Special Forces, PBS, Joint Chiefs, Staff, Strategic, International Studies Locations: Afghanistan, The Washington, Afghan, Army's, Kandahar, Washington, United States
For more than a year after the loophole was repealed, CBP had no more than four employees working on forced labor issues, and it had no official forced labor budget. U.S. Customs and Border ProtectionThe government has additional forced labor tools that have rarely or never been used, including civil fines and prosecutions of forced labor importers. "There needs to be no safe harbor for forced labor goods," said Allison Gill, the forced labor director of the nonprofit Global Labor Justice-International Labor Rights Forum. Most countries decry forced labor, but until last year, the U.S. was the only country with the statutory power to detain goods made with forced labor. In June, the G7 announced a commitment to fight forced labor and directed its trade ministers to come up with forced labor strategies to discuss at its next meeting in October.
Persons: Steve Lamar, Lamar, Biden, Nova, Allison Gill, John Sifton, Martina Vandenberg Organizations: American Apparel and Footwear Association, Nonprofit, Trump, CBP, . Customs, Border, Labor Division, Office, GAO, Customs, DOJ, Worker Rights Consortium, Global Labor Justice, International Labor Rights, U.S, Canadian Border Services Agency, Human Rights Watch, Trafficking Locations: Xinjiang, Atlanta, China's Xinjiang, China, New York, Newark, U.S, France, Mexico, Canada, Mexico's, Australia, Taiwan, North Korea
North Korea is forcing its youth into "backbreaking" hard labor, Human Rights Watch said. The rights group said North Korea's practices violate international labor law and human rights law. The rights group alleged North Korea's brutal practices violate international labor law and human rights law. But refusing to participate can end in punishments like torture and prison, the rights group said. Young people were also told to embrace North Korean leadership, the rights group said, and follow along with government propaganda.
Persons: Kim Jong Un Organizations: Human Rights Watch, Service, KCNA Watch Locations: Korea, Korean
Singapore PM wins $275,000 in latest defamation suits
  + stars: | 2021-09-01 | by ( ) www.reuters.com   time to read: +2 min
Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris (not pictured) hold a joint news conference in Singapore, August 23, 2021. Xu, a Singaporean, was ordered to pay Lee S$210,000, while in a separate suit over the same article, Malaysian Rubaashini was ordered to pay S$160,000. Lee appeared in court in the case in May, during which he said "sensational allegations" had been made. In April, an activist and a financial advisor separately turned to crowdfunding in Singapore to raise tens of thousands of dollars to pay Lee damages after the premier sued both for defamation. ($1 = 1.3449 Singapore dollars)Reporting by Chen Lin; Editing by Martin PettyOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Lee Hsien Loong, Kamala Harris, Evelyn Hockstein, Lee Kuan Yew, Rubaashini Shunmuganathan, Xu Yuan Chen, Terry Xu, Lee, Audrey Lim, Lim, Xu, Lee Kuan, Chen Lin, Martin Petty Organizations: Singapore's, REUTERS, The, Party, Rights Watch, Thomson Locations: Singapore, SINGAPORE, Malaysian, crowdfunding, York
Paul Rusesabagina, portrayed as a hero in a Hollywood movie about Rwanda's 1994 genocide, sits inside a courtroom in Kigali, Rwanda February 26, 2021. REUTERS/Clement UwiringiyimanaKIGALI, Sept 1 (Reuters) - Rwanda's President Paul Kagame has removed the justice minister but made him ambassador to Britian amid international scrutiny over the trial of Paul Rusesabagina, the hotelier credited with saving many lives during the 1994 genocide. A government statement issued on Tuesday gave no reason for the dismissal of Johnston Busingye, who had served as justice minister and attorney general since 2013. Kagame did not immediately name a new justice minister. Rusesabagina was hailed as hero after he used his connections as the manager of a Kigali hotel to save ethnic Tutsis from slaughter during the genocide.
Persons: Paul Rusesabagina, Clement Uwiringiyimana, Paul Kagame, Johnston Busingye, Busingye, Kagame, spokespeople, Rusesabagina, Rusesabagina's, , Maggie Fick, Angus MacSwan Organizations: REUTERS, Prosecutors, Qatar, Rights Watch, Thomson Locations: Kigali, Rwanda, Clement Uwiringiyimana KIGALI, Britain, United States, Jazeera, New York
Singapore PM wins more defamation suits against bloggers
  + stars: | 2021-09-01 | by ( ) www.reuters.com   time to read: +2 min
Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris (not pictured) hold a joint news conference in Singapore, August 23, 2021. Xu, a Singaporean, and Malaysian Rubaashini were ordered to pay Lee S$210,000 and S$160,000 respectively. The judge, however, asked them to jointly pay S$160,000 in damages, as the lawsuits concerned the same defamatory article. Lee appeared in court in the case involving TOC in May, during which he said "sensational allegations" had been made. ($1 = 1.3462 Singapore dollars)Reporting by Chen Lin; Editing by Martin PettyOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Lee Hsien Loong, Kamala Harris, Evelyn Hockstein, Lee Kuan Yew, Rubaashini Shunmuganathan, Xu Yuan Chen, Terry Xu, Lee, Audrey Lim, Lim, Xu, Rubaashini, Lee Kuan, Chen Lin, Martin Petty Organizations: Singapore's, REUTERS, Online, Malaysian, Party, Rights Watch, Thomson Locations: Singapore, SINGAPORE, York
Tiffany & Co.’s latest campaign “About Love,” featuring Beyoncé, Jay-Z, the rarely seen Jean-Michel Basquiat painting “Equals Pi” and the infamous 128.54-carat yellow Tiffany Diamond is not about love at all. A stolen moment from behind-the-scenes of our new ABOUT LOVE campaign starring the inimitable @Beyonce and @sc. The so-called Tiffany Diamond was previously worn by Audrey Hepburn, Lady Gaga and the American socialite Mary Whitehouse, the first time it was paraded in public, at a Tiffany Ball in 1957. The problem is the backstory of the yellow Tiffany Diamond. In 2004, I was working in Sierra Leone as a documentary producer, doing a story on blood diamonds and the atrocities committed there in the 1990s.
Persons: Tiffany, Beyoncé, Jay, Jean, Michel Basquiat, Tiffany Diamond, — Tiffany, Audrey Hepburn, Jean Schlumberger’s Bird, Basquiat, Basquiat's, Sotheby’s, Basquiat would’ve, , Andy Warhol, De, Lady Gaga, Mary Whitehouse, Tiffany Ball, Tiffany ”, Charles Lewis Tiffany, Karen Attiah, couldn’t, Foday Sankoh, Amputations, bankroll, Attiah, wasn’t, , Tina Knowles, beyoncé doesn’t Organizations: Co, Tiffany, Rights Watch, United Nations, Revolutionary United Front, Sierra, Black Locations: Puerto Rican, Haitian, York, De Beers, South Africa, American, Kimberley, Africa, Washington, Sierra Leone, Freetown, Sierra, Sierra Leoneans, New York City, Beyoncé
He is among millions of Afghans who are members of religious minorities and fear that the militants' return to power will spell oppression or death. Khalsa, who is Sikh and lives in Kabul, said the Taliban takeover has left her and her family worried about their future and safety. Community leaders estimate that there are only about 550 Afghan Sikhs and Hindus left, according to the State Department. In March last year, gunmen raided a Sikh religious complex in Kabul, killing 25 people, Reuters reported. We want to leave but it is so difficult right now.”There are signs that the Taliban are already targeting minorities.
Persons: Ali, hasn’t, Michelle Bachelet, Wakil Kohsar, Khalsa, Agnès Callamard, Zabulon Simantov, Osama bin Laden, Al, Kabul's Hamid Karzai, Narindra Singh Khalsa, Amarinder Singh Organizations: United Nations, Getty, Group, State Department, Khalsa, NBC, Reuters, Amnesty International, NBC News, Independence, Human Rights Watch, Haaretz, Taliban Locations: WhatsApp, Kabul, Hazara, Tak Darakht, Bamiyan province, AFP, Afghanistan, India, Europe, America, Ghazni, Afghan, United States, State Khorasan, New Delhi, Punjab
Live Live Updates: For Afghans, a Fraught Transition to Life Under the Taliban The Afghan public has been left largely powerless as the country’s new leaders sort their fates. Six days remain until the U.S. withdrawal deadline, which Group of 7 leaders were unable to persuade President Biden to ease. Shoppers making their way through a market in Kabul, Afghanistan, on Saturday. He gave reporters a barrage of figures about the accelerating evacuation effort at the Kabul airport, saying that 70,700 people had been airlifted out so far. And a Taliban spokesman said on Tuesday that the group’s fighters would physically block Afghans from going to the airport.
Persons: Biden, Victor J, Banks, Zabihullah Mujahid, Mr, Mujahid, Mohib, , Daniel Victor, Norimitsu Onishi, I’ve, We’re, Jim Huylebroek, , Jen Psaki, Doug Mills, Psaki, Michael D, Annie Karni, haven’t, Ahmadullah Waseq, Heather Barr, , Brian Castner, Castner, that’s, Sayed, Barr, Maggie Astor, Sharif Hassan, Hank Taylor, John F, Kirby, Helene Cooper Organizations: Afghan, Shoppers, ., The New York Times, Government, United Nations, , United, U.S, Pentagon, State Department, NATO, White, White House, New York Times, American, Hamid, Defense Department, Sunday ., Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, Amnesty, Human Rights, The U.S, The New York Times WASHINGTON Locations: U.S, Kabul, Afghanistan, United States, , Sunday, , The
Hong Kong (CNN) Faced with a worrying demographic crisis of its own making, China is encouraging couples to have more children. There is currently no national law that provides paternity leave in China. Unsurprisingly, many younger career-minded women in China have become increasingly disillusioned with traditions and institutions like marriage and childbirth. "Beijing continues to coerce, to intimidate and to make claims to the vast majority of the South China Sea," Harris said in the speech in Singapore. China claims almost all of the 1.3 million square mile South China Sea as its sovereign territory.
Persons: There's, aren't, China's, isn't, , Xu Chao, Kamala Harris, Harris, Joe Biden, Ben Westcott, Zhang, Xi, Chen Lei, Tencent, Xi Jinping, Laura He Organizations: CNN, Communist Party, Human Rights Watch, Xinhua, — Shanghai, China US, US, Algerian, Paralympic, The Games, Big, Pinduoduo, Nasdaq Locations: China, Hong Kong, Weibo, Xinhua, People's Republic of China, Japan, South Korea, Shandong, South, Southeast Asia, Beijing, South China, Singapore, United States, Philippines, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Tokyo, Hangzhou —
Iran prisons head apologises after leaked pictures show abuse
  + stars: | 2021-08-24 | by ( ) www.reuters.com   time to read: +2 min
DUBAI, Aug 24 (Reuters) - The head of Iran's prisons apologised on Tuesday for "bitter events" in Tehran's Evin prison after videos leaked by hackers showed beatings of prisoners, a rare admission of abuse by authorities. It was a rare admission of human rights abuses in Iran, which often has dismissed criticism of its human rights record as baseless. Evin prison, which mostly holds detainees facing security charges, has long been criticised by Western rights groups and it was blacklisted by the U.S. government in 2018 for "serious human rights abuses". In July, Iran faced cyberattacks on the website of its transport ministry and the state railway company. read moreReporting by Dubai newsroom, Editing by Angus MacSwanOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Ali, Mohammad Mehdi Hajmohammadi, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Hajmohammadi, cyberattacks, Angus MacSwan Organizations: U.S, Rights Watch, Dubai, Thomson Locations: DUBAI, Iran
The claim that restrictions on women’s lives are a temporary necessity is not new to Afghan women. The Taliban made similar claims the last time they controlled Afghanistan, said Heather Barr, the associate director of women’s rights at Human Rights Watch. “If a random Taliban fighter commits a human rights abuse or violation, that’s just kind of random violence, that’s one thing. But if there’s a systematic going to people’s homes and looking for people, that’s not a random fighter that’s untrained — that’s a system working. But in central areas with many Taliban fighters, few women ventured out, and those who did wore burqas, said Sayed, a civil servant.
Persons: Heather Barr, , Brian Castner, , Castner, Mr, that’s, Sayed, Barr, , Sharif Hassan, Norimitsu Onishi Organizations: Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, Amnesty, Human Rights Locations: Afghanistan, , Kabul
Biden Says U.S. Is on Track to Finish Evacuation by Deadline The president said the risk of a terrorist attack at the Kabul airport was growing with every day U.S. forces are on the ground. He confirmed we are currently on pace to finish by Aug. 31.” Image “The sooner we can finish the better,” President Biden said of the evacuation from Afghanistan during an address at the White House on Tuesday. The rising pressure from Congress came as President Biden said that he intended — for now — to stand by the end of the month deadline. Credit... Anna Moneymaker for The New York Times Today with @RepMeijer I visited Kabul airport to conduct oversight on the evacuation. Credit... Stefani Reynolds for The New York Times European allies failed in their campaign to persuade President Biden to extend the evacuation from Kabul beyond his Aug. 31 deadline.
Persons: Biden, I’ve, We’re, Jim Huylebroek, Mr, , , Jen Psaki, Doug Mills, Psaki, Michael D, Annie Karni, Sarabeth, Jason Crow, Elissa Slotkin, Michael McCaul of, ” Mr, McCaul, Lawmakers, Ms, Slotkin, haven’t, Victor J, Zabihullah Mujahid, Mujahid, Ahmadullah Waseq, Heather Barr, , Brian Castner, Castner, that’s, Sayed, Barr, Maggie Astor, Sharif Hassan, Nancy Pelosi, Seth Moulton, Peter Meijer, Erin Schaff, Anna Moneymaker, bWGQh1iw2c — Seth Moulton, Moulton, Meijer, Pelosi, didn’t, Stefani Reynolds, Boris Johnson, Britain, they’ve, Johnson, Angela Merkel, Germany, Merkel, Justin Trudeau of, Wolfgang Ischinger, Gerard Araud, Hank Taylor, John F, Kirby, Helene Cooper, Witnesses, United States “, Hamid Karzai, Megan Specia, William J, Burns, Abdul Ghani Baradar, Trump, Biden’s, Burns’s, Jordan, Obama, Haibatullah Akhundzada, Baradar, Mohammed Omar, Mullah Omar, Kai Eide, Baradar’s, Donald J, Julian E, Barnes, Mohammad, Omar, grumbling, Jaap de Hoop, NATO’s, Rem Korteweg, Chang W, Lee, Nikki Dryden, ” Ms, Dryden, Scott Morrison, , Michelle Bachelet, Salvatore Di Nolfi, Bachelet, Shahrazad Akbar, Akbar, Kamala Harris’s, Harris, Kamala Harris, Evelyn Hockstein, Jose Luis Magana, Brian Chesky, Chesky, Airbnb, Nicole Tung, Turkey —, Recep Tayyip Erdogan of, Van Organizations: U.S, Taliban, Pentagon, State Department, NATO, The New York Times, White, White House, , ., New York Times, American, Hamid, Defense Department, Democratic, Democrats, Republicans, State, Credit, New York Times Lawmakers, Biden, United States Congress, Democrat, Army, Lawmakers, Joint Chiefs, Staff, Republican, Foreign Affairs, Twitter, Sunday ., Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International, Amnesty, Human Rights, Massachusetts, Associated Press, Mr, , BBC, Western, Diplomats, The New York Times WASHINGTON, United, Video, U.S ., Islamic, National Security, The Washington, United Nations, Emergency, Embassy, Clingendael Institute, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, ABC, Afghanistan Paralympic Committee, Afghan, The United Nations, of Islamic, China’s, Agence France, Getty, Air Force, Washington Dulles International, Virginia . Credit, Press, Airbnb.org, Fund, International Rescue, Washington State Locations: Kabul, U.S, Afghanistan, United States, , House, American, America, Colorado, Michigan, Michael McCaul of Texas, White, Sunday, , Massachusetts, Afghan, Washington, Britain, France, Justin Trudeau of Canada, Hamilton , Ontario, German, Europe, French, Qatar, Islamic State, Russia, Iran, Pakistan, Doha, Lashkar, Helmand, The New York Times BRUSSELS, Germany, Italy, States, , Libya, Syria, Iraq, Tokyo, Canadian, Australia, that’s, Zealand, United Nations, Geneva, Southeast Asia, China, South China, Beijing, Singapore, Vietnam, Saigon, Virginia ., Airbnb, California , New Jersey , Ohio , Texas, Virginia, Turkish, Van, Turkey, The New York Times VAN, Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey
Human Rights Watch says Israeli airstrikes during the May conflict may amount to war crimes. The accusation comes after the rights group on August 12 said Hamas attacks were likely war crimes. The May conflict left 260 Palestinians and 12 Israelis dead. The accusation comes following an August 12 report from Human Rights Watch that said rocket and mortar attacks by the Palestinian militant group Hamas likely violated the laws of war and could amount to war crimes. The May conflict left 260 Palestinians and 12 Israelis dead, in the region's worst violence since 2014.
Persons: Richard Weir, flagrantly, Eric Goldstein Organizations: Rights Watch, Service, Human Rights Watch, Hamas, Criminal Locations: Gaza City, Palestinian, East, North Africa
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