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Biden gives green light to bipartisan infrastructure plan
  + stars: | 2021-06-24 | by ( David Morgan | Richard Cowan | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +4 min
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -U.S. President Joe Biden on Thursday embraced a bipartisan Senate deal to spend hundreds of billions of dollars on infrastructure projects, building roads, bridges and highways and helping stimulate the economy. U.S. President Joe Biden speaks to Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), following a bipartisan meeting with U.S. senators about the proposed framework for the infrastructure bill, at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 24, 2021. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque“We have a deal,” Biden told reporters, flanked by Democratic and Republican senators who wrote the $1.2 trillion proposal, which came after months of White House negotiations with lawmakers. Democratic and Republican members of the group displayed high spirits, chuckling and smiling together at microphones in the driveway of the White House. Biden was due to speak further about the deal at the White House at 2 p.m.
Persons: Joe Biden, Rob Portman, Kevin Lamarque “, ” Biden, Republican Rob Portman, , Mitch McConnell, Mitt Romney, Biden, Portman, McConnell, ” Portman, hasn’t, ” McConnell, , There’s, John Thune, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Schumer, ” Schumer, Pelosi, Republicans chafed, Lisa Murkowski, Thune Organizations: WASHINGTON, White, REUTERS, Democratic, Republican, Democrats, White House, Capitol, Biden, Democrat, Republicans, Congressional, Office Locations: Washington , U.S, White, Alaska
The second measure would be passed through a Senate maneuver called reconciliation here, which would allow it to take effect without Republican votes. “I expect that in the coming months this summer, before the fiscal year is over, that we will have voted on this (bipartisan) bill - the infrastructure bill - as well as voted on the budget resolution,” Biden told reporters at the White House. “It almost makes your head spin.”McConnell, Pelosi and Schumer have not been directly involved with the bipartisan infrastructure talks. Slideshow ( 6 images )RECONCILIATION REDUXPelosi said the House would vote on the bipartisan bill only after the Senate had also approved the additional reconciliation bill. Republicans chafed at his definition of infrastructure, which included fighting climate change and providing care for children and the elderly.
Persons: Joe Biden, , ” Biden, Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, I’m, Mitch McConnell, ” McConnell, Pelosi, Schumer, McConnell, , Lindsey Graham, Biden, Donald Trump’s, ” Schumer, Republicans chafed, John Thune Organizations: WASHINGTON, U.S, Republican, White, Internal Revenue Service, Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Democratic, Republicans, Congressional, Office Locations: U.S, Washington
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democrats in Congress and at the White House nudged Republicans on Wednesday to join them in forging an agreement on a $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan. Two senior Democrats said they expected Wednesday’s meetings to yield results in negotiations that began after Biden rejected a Republican infrastructure proposal just over two weeks ago. The White House team includes Biden’s legislative director Louisa Terrell and Steve Ricchetti, counselor to the president. Senate Budget Committee Chairman Bernie Sanders is working up a far more ambitious infrastructure blueprint of $6 trillion. That maneuver would require all 48 Democrats and the two independents that caucus with them to agree.
Persons: Tom Brenner, Jon Tester, , Joe Biden, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Biden, Obama, Todd Young, Hakeem Jeffries, Louisa Terrell, Steve Ricchetti, Bernie Sanders, Schumer, Kamala Harris Organizations: WASHINGTON, White House nudged Republicans, U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, ” Democratic, Democrat, White, Republicans, Republican, Reuters, ” House Democratic, Senate, Democratic Locations: Washington , U.S
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Democrats in the U.S. Congress and at the White House nudged Republicans on Wednesday to join them in forging an agreement on a $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan by the end of business on Thursday. A second Democratic negotiator, Senator Joe Manchin, told reporters they hoped to have a deal before the Senate breaks on Thursday for the July 4 Independence Day holiday. Senate Budget Committee Chairman Bernie Sanders is working up a far more ambitious infrastructure blueprint of $6 trillion. Schumer has said he plans to hold a July vote on a bipartisan infrastructure bill and follow up in the autumn with a second Democratic-only measure. That maneuver would require all 48 Democrats and the two independents that caucus with them to agree.
Persons: Jon Tester, Joe Manchin, , Joe Biden, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Biden, Obama, Todd Young, Bernie Sanders, Schumer, Kamala Harris Organizations: WASHINGTON, U.S . Congress, White House nudged Republicans, ” Democratic, Reuters, Democratic, Democrat, Republican, White, Republicans, Senate
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -A bipartisan group of U.S. senators sought agreement on a $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan by the end of business on Thursday, with President Joe Biden awaiting final numbers and multiple meetings with White House officials on the agenda. Although not taking part directly, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, in an interview with Fox News Radio, called the talks “constructive” but said it was “too early to say” whether a deal would emerge. The White House turned its attention to the group of 21 senators after Biden rejected a Republican infrastructure proposal just over two weeks ago. Asked how he felt about the bipartisan infrastructure plan, Biden told reporters: “I’ll tell you that when I get the final numbers tonight.”A sticking point is how to pay for it. Schumer has said he plans to hold a July vote on a bipartisan infrastructure bill and follow up in the autumn with a second Democratic-only measure.
Persons: Joe Biden, Jon Tester, Joe Manchin, , Biden, Mitch McConnell, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, , Obama, Todd Young, Bernie Sanders, Schumer, Kamala Harris Organizations: WASHINGTON, White, Democratic, Democrat, Republican, Fox News Radio, Republicans, Senate, Reuters
U.S. Democrats vow 'long march' toward voting rights reforms
  + stars: | 2021-06-23 | by ( Richard Cowan | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +4 min
Given Senate Republicans' solid opposition, Schumer has a tough battle ahead. 2 Democrat, this week spoke of breaking up a voting rights initiative into smaller bits that might test Republican resolve. "Our American Democracy is in peril, and today, every single Senate Republican voted against saving it. Democrats also could pursue a bill that would restore Washington's oversight of certain states' changes to election laws and build a more expansive voting rights bill upon that. Some Republicans are on record as potentially supporting the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, named after the late civil rights leader and Democratic congressman.
Persons: Chuck Schumer, Joshua Roberts WASHINGTON, Schumer, Dick Durbin, Nancy Pelosi, Donald Trump's, Amy Klobuchar, Joe Manchin, Klobuchar, John Lewis, Kyrsten Sinema, Richard Cowan, Scott Malone, Gerry Doyle Organizations: Democratic, Capitol, REUTERS, U.S . Congress, Republicans, American Democracy, Republican, , Democrats, John Lewis Voting, Senate, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, Washington
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Republicans in the narrowly divided U.S. Senate on Tuesday blocked an election reform bill considered a top priority by Democrats seeking to offset a wave of laws passed by Republican-led state legislatures that impose new limits on voting. The 50-50 party-line vote fell short of the 60-vote threshold to advance most legislation in the Senate, sparking new calls by some Democrats to rethink that rule, known as the filibuster. Republicans argued that the bill infringed on states’ rights to set voting policy. Those claims were rejected by multiple courts, state election authorities and Trump’s own administration. The court in coming days could further weaken the Voting Rights Act in a ruling on voting restrictions in Arizona.
Persons: Chuck Schumer, Joe Biden, ” Biden, “ I’ve, Donald Trump’s, Mitch McConnell, , Marco Rubio, , Joe Manchin, Steny Hoyer, Debbie Stabenow Organizations: WASHINGTON, Senate, Republican, Republicans, Democratic, Democrats, Constitution, NEXT, Moderate Democratic, Justice Department, Civil Rights Division Locations: U.S, Florida, Washington, United States, Arizona
Democrats' voting rights plan faces long odds in U.S. Senate
  + stars: | 2021-06-22 | by ( Richard Cowan | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +4 min
Voting stickers are seen at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus, Ohio U.S., October 28, 2016. "How does making it a crime to give food or water to voters waiting in long lines at the polls deter voter fraud?" Republicans say the state measures are needed to stop fraud, which former President Donald Trump falsely claimed resulted in his November defeat. That would require winning over moderate Democrat Joe Manchin, who opposes the House bill and a companion Senate bill and has been trying to find Republicans to join a bipartisan measure. But the Constitution also allows Washington to alter those rules, and Democrats argue they are only setting some minimum standards for states.
Persons: Shannon Stapleton, Chuck Schumer, Schumer, Donald Trump, Joe Manchin, Mitch McConnell, They've, McConnell, Wendy Weiser, Richard Cowan, Chris Kahn, Makini Brice, Susan Cornwell, David Morgan, Scott Malone, Cynthia Osterman Organizations: Franklin County Board, Columbus , Ohio U.S, REUTERS, WASHINGTON, Republican, Republicans, Senate, Constitution, Reuters, U.S . Senate, House, Center for Justice, Thomson Locations: Franklin County, Columbus , Ohio, United States, Washington, Georgia, Iowa, Florida
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) talks to reporters following the Senate Democrats weekly policy lunch at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., June 15, 2021. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has scheduled a procedural vote for Tuesday to let the Senate begin debating an election reform bill. Manchin, a moderate Democratic senator, opposes a broader bill passed by the Democratic-led U.S. House of Representatives in March, and offered his own election reform ideas last week. read moreBut with Senate Republicans poised to withhold their support, Schumer is unlikely to get the 60 votes needed to begin debate on a bill. 'FEDERAL TAKEOVER'Republican lawmakers on Sunday reiterated their strong opposition to Democrats' federal election proposals.
Persons: Chuck Schumer, Evelyn Hockstein WASHINGTON, Kamala Harris, Joe Manchin, Schumer, Donald Trump's, Joe Biden, Lindsey Graham, Rob Portman, NBC's, Trump, Richard Cowan, Susan Cornwell, Soyoung Kim, Peter Cooney Organizations: U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, U.S . Senate, Democrats, Republican, Democrat, Democratic, House, Representatives, Republicans, Sunday, Fox, Press, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, U.S, Georgia, Florida, Iowa
Voting rights activists gather during a protest against Texas legislators who are advancing a slew of new voting restrictions in Austin, Texas, U.S., May 8, 2021. Republican-controlled legislatures in six competitive states have passed bills that voting rights advocates have denounced as partisan power grabs. "I've never seen .... such an outward assault on voting rights. Biden has tapped Vice President Kamala Harris to lead a national charge aimed at protecting voting rights. "Voting rights are under assault."
Persons: Mikala, Elizabeth Warren, Donald Trump's, Mitch McConnell, I've, Joe Biden, Biden, Kamala Harris, Wendy Weiser, Joe Manchin, John Lewis, I'm, Manchin, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Richard Cowan, Makini Brice, Cynthia Osterman Organizations: Texas, REUTERS, WASHINGTON, U.S, Senate Democrats, Republican, Democrats, Democratic, Republicans, Capitol, Wednesday, Representatives, Center for Justice, Moderate Democratic, Thomson Locations: Austin , Texas, U.S, Congress, Geneva, Pennsylvania, Florida, Arizona, West Virginia
Voting rights activists gather during a protest against Texas legislators who are advancing a slew of new voting restrictions in Austin, Texas, U.S., May 8, 2021. Warnock said Manchin's ideas were "very significant" because they could unite the 48 Senate Democrats and two independents, boosting chances for passing a bill. Republican Senator Mike Lee said he believed the voting rights bill would hurt his party's electoral chances: "This bill isn't about strengthening democracy. Senate Democrats' first preference would be to pass a version of the "For the People" bill approved by the House of Representatives in March. Manchin, a former West Virginia state election official, has proposed revisions that include requiring voters to prove their identities.
Persons: Mikala, Joe Manchin, Raphael Warnock, Warnock, Mitch McConnell, Donald Trump's, Trump, Amy Klobuchar, We'll, Mike Lee, whohold, Elizabeth Warren, Wendy Weiser, John Lewis, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Richard Cowan, Makini Brice, Cynthia Osterman Organizations: Texas, REUTERS, WASHINGTON, U.S, Senate Democrats, Democratic, Republican, Center for Justice, Democrats, Representatives, Thomson Locations: Austin , Texas, U.S, Georgia, United States, Pennsylvania, Florida, Arizona, West Virginia
Schumer hopes for July vote for bipartisan infrastructure bill
  + stars: | 2021-06-15 | by ( ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.96   time to read: +1 min
U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) arrives for the Senate Democrats weekly policy lunch at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., June 15, 2021. REUTERS/Evelyn HocksteinWASHINGTON, June 15 (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said on Tuesday he hoped to have a July vote on a bipartisan infrastructure bill, but a second measure would be needed to incorporate climate and human infrastructure measures. The top Senate Democrat told reporters there are many in his caucus who think the bipartisan proposal is a good start but does not do enough. Democrats and Republicans in the 50-50 split Senate have been negotiating behind the scenes on a potential $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill, with slightly more than half of that plan consisting of new funding. "In order to move forward on infrastructure, we must include bold action on climate," Schumer told reporters.
Persons: Chuck Schumer, Evelyn Hockstein WASHINGTON, Joe Biden, Schumer, Mitch McConnell, Richard Cowan, Doina Chiacu, Chris Reese Organizations: Senate, U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, Republicans, Republican, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S
Republican U.S. Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene publicly apologized on Monday for her remarks last month comparing COVID-19 mask requirements and vaccinations to the Nazi Holocaust that killed 6 million Jews. "I have made a mistake and it's really bothered me for a couple weeks now," Greene told a news conference. The news conference came amid calls from some Democrats to censure Greene for her Holocaust remarks. 1/3 Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) walks outside the U.S. Capitol following a private visit to the Holocaust Museum in Washington, U.S., June 14, 2021. Greene opened her news conference saying: “I just always want to remind everyone I’m very much a normal person.”Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Marjorie Taylor Greene, it's, Greene, Evelyn Hockstein Read, Donald Trump, Organizations: Republican U.S, Nazi, Republican, United States Holocaust Memorial, U.S, Capitol, Holocaust Museum, REUTERS, Democratic, Thomson Locations: Poland, Washington , U.S, Georgia, Washington, Charlottesville , Virginia, Congress, California
Senator Joe Manchin concluded a meeting with major civil rights groups on Tuesday giving no indication he would drop his opposition to a sweeping elections and campaign reform bill sought by his fellow Democrats. Following the more than hour-long meeting conducted remotely, Manchin spoke briefly to reporters and described a conversation that was "respectful" and "excellent," noting the talks would continue. They issued a joint statement in which they "conveyed to Senator Manchin that a minority of senators must not be able to abuse the filibuster to impede much needed progress." It would take the support of all 48 Senate Democrats and two independents who caucus with them to alter the filibuster rule. Manchin on Tuesday sidestepped a reporter's question on whether he would even vote to allow the election reform legislation advance to a full debate.
Persons: Sen, Joe Manchin, Jill Biden, Oliver Contreras, Manchin, Joe Biden, Democrat Biden, Donald Trump, Derrick Johnson Organizations: Capital High School, U.S, Senate, Democrat, National Urban League, National Action Network, Thomson Locations: Charleston , West Virginia, U.S, West Virginia
Seven U.S. civil rights leaders met with Senator Joe Manchin to urge the Democrat to drop his opposition to a sweeping election reform bill backed by his party, but the West Virginian emerged from the virtual meeting unmoved. "Democracy is under the kind of attack we have not seen since the Jim Crow days ... this is not just the South. It’s all across the nation," said Marc Morial, president of the National Urban League civil rights organization, in a telephone interview after the meeting with Manchin. The civil rights groups issued a joint statement in which they "conveyed to Senator Manchin that a minority of senators must not be able to abuse the filibuster to impede much needed progress." Manchin also has said he would oppose changing Senate rules to modify or scrap the filibuster.
Persons: Joe Manchin, Donald Trump, Joe Biden, Jim Crow, Marc Morial, Morial, Manchin, Sen, Jill Biden, Oliver Contreras, Mitch McConnell, John Lewis Organizations: West Virginian, Democratic, Republican, National Urban League, Senate, Capital High School, NAACP, National Action Network, Thomson Locations: West, United States, West Virginia, Charleston , West Virginia, U.S
Slideshow ( 3 images )McGahn, who served as Trump’s presidential lawyer for nearly two years before resigning in October 2018, testified in a day-long, closed-door session before the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee. McGahn appeared under a subpoena issued about two years ago to testify as the committee was looking into allegations of wrong-doing by Trump. Late in 2019, the House voted to impeach Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Under an agreement with the Department of Justice, Judiciary Committee members declined to provide specifics of what he said before then. But Mueller said such interactions either did not amount to criminal behavior or would be difficult to prove in court.
Persons: Donald Trump’s, Don McGahn “, McGahn, Trump ., Trump, “ Mr, Trump’s, Jerrold Nadler, Matt Gaetz, Don McGahn, ” Gaetz, Representative Madeleine Dean, McGahn “, Rod Rosenstein, Robert, Mueller, , Rosenstein Organizations: WASHINGTON, White, . House, Trump, Senate, Republican, Department of Justice, Representative
There is little room for defections among House Democrats. Multiple progressive Democrats have urged Biden to abandon efforts to get Republicans on board with an infrastructure deal. Democratic Senator Joe Manchin has said he would prefer bipartisan infrastructure legislation. His opposition alone could sink the effort, unless Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer can reel in some Republicans. "This is not the time for half-spending or half-measures," said Democratic Senator Ed Markey.
Persons: Pramila Jayapal, Graeme Jennings, Joe Biden's, Biden, Jayapal, Kamala Harris, Donald Trump, Ilhan Omar, Shelley Moore Capito, Peter Welch, Joe Manchin, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Ed Markey Organizations: Antitrust, Rayburn House, REUTERS Progressive Democrats, U.S . Congress, Republicans, Congressional Progressive Caucus, Democrats, U.S . Capitol Police, Democratic, Senate, U.S, Capitol, Thomson Locations: Rayburn, Washington , U.S, torpedoing, U.S, Washington
Senator Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV) listens during a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., February 3, 2021. REUTERS/Brandon Bell/PoolNegotiations with U.S. President Joe Biden over a potentially massive infrastructure investment package are inching forward even though disagreements remain over the size and scope of such legislation, Republican Senator Shelley Moore Capito said on Sunday. "I think we can get to real compromise, absolutely, because we're both still in the game," Capito said in an interview with "Fox News Sunday." read moreThe Republican senators have proposed $928 billion to improve roads, bridges and other traditional infrastructure projects. He also highlighted the need for using the infrastructure bill to address climate change and signaled opposition to shifting COVID-19 relief money to infrastructure accounts.
Persons: Shelley Moore Capito, Brandon Bell, Joe Biden, Capito, Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Buttigieg, I'm, Trump, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris Organizations: Environment, Public, Capitol, REUTERS, U.S, Fox, Republicans, White, Republican, West Virginia, Senate, CNN, Democratic, Democrats, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, West, Congress, Washington
All 10 of the House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump in January voted for the commission. The bipartisan outcome could give Senate Republicans second thoughts about working to defeat the initiative. Earlier in the day, McConnell announced he would not support the House bill, calling it “the House Democrats’ slanted and unbalanced proposal” and saying existing congressional investigations are sufficient. The House bill, unveiled last week, would give Republicans equal power with Democrats in appointing commissioners and equal say over witnesses. House Democrats said congressional investigations are insufficient.
Persons: Donald Trump’s, , Kevin McCarthy, Mitch McConnell, Trump, Steny Hoyer, McCarthy “, McCarthy, McConnell, Kamala Harris, , Nancy Pelosi, that’s, ” Pelosi, Joe Biden’s, John Katko, , ” Katko, Bennie Thompson, Chuck Schumer, Schumer, Donald Trump, Susan Collins, John Cornyn, Zoe Lofgren, Mike Pence, Lofgren, ” Lofgren, Marjorie Taylor Greene, President Trump, ” Trump Organizations: WASHINGTON, U.S . House, Capitol, Republican, Capitol Police, Senate, House Republicans, , Democrats, Republicans, House Homeland Security, Democrat, Republican Party, Democratic, Administration Committee, Trump, Tuesday Locations: United States, Trump
REUTERS/Brendan SmialowskiThe U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday is expected to approve creating a 10-member commission to probe the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riot, testing Republicans' loyalty to former President Donald Trump, whose supporters mounted the attack. Democrats narrowly control the House and expect to pass the measure with or without significant Republican support. On Tuesday, House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy, along with other senior Republicans, announced their opposition to the commission. It would look at security and intelligence failures surrounding Jan. 6, when Trump's supporters violently stormed the Capitol, some brandishing weapons, Confederate flags and anti-Semitic T-shirts. "An independent 9/11-style review is critical to removing the politics surrounding Jan. 6," Republican Representative John Katko told the House Rules Committee on Tuesday.
Persons: Brian Sicknick, Brendan Smialowski, Donald Trump, Mitch McConnell, Kevin McCarthy, Trump's, Joe Biden's, Trump, John Katko, Katko, it's, McCarthy, McConnell, Steve Scalise Organizations: National Guard, Capitol Police, U.S . Capitol, U.S, Capitol, U.S . House, Senate, Republican, Republicans, Department of Justice, Congressional Republicans, Thomson Locations: United States, al Qaeda
REUTERS/Leah MillisLegislation to create a 9/11-style commission to investigate the deadly Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol attack by a mob of former President Donald Trump’s supporters suffered a serious setback on Tuesday when House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy came out against it. 2 House Republican, during a practice at a baseball field. McCarthy also noted that several congressional committees already are investigating the Capitol attack. House Republicans last week ousted Representative Liz Cheney from their leadership for rejecting Trump's falsehoods. During a House hearing last week, Republican Representative Andrew Clyde said it would be "a bold-faced lie" to label the events of Jan. 6 an "insurrection."
Persons: Donald Trump, Leah Millis, Donald Trump’s, Kevin McCarthy, McCarthy, Joe Biden's, Steve Scalise, Trump, Liz Cheney, Andrew Clyde Organizations: U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, Republican, Democratic, Representatives Homeland Security, Trump, Capitol Police, Republicans, Lawmakers, National Guard, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, Trump ., U.S, United States, al Qaeda
Hundreds of Trump supporters stormed the Capitol, interrupting the formal congressional certification of President Joe Biden's election victory, fighting with police and leaving five dead including a police officer. 2 House Republican, during a practice at a baseball field. The Capitol rampage came after Trump gave an incendiary speech to his followers, repeating his false claims of a stolen election. House Republicans last week ousted Representative Liz Cheney from their leadership for rejecting Trump's falsehoods. Republican lawmakers also voiced opposition to the $1.9 billion bill that would help pay for costs related to the Jan. 6 attack and improve security at the Capitol complex.
Persons: Donald Trump's, Kevin McCarthy, McCarthy, Trump, Nancy Pelosi, Pelosi, Joe Biden's, Steve Scalise, Tom Cole, Donald Trump, Leah Millis Read, Liz Cheney, Norma Torres Organizations: Democratic, Capitol, Republican, House Homeland Security, Trump, U.S, REUTERS, Republicans, National Guard, Lawmakers, Thomson Locations: U.S, Washington , U.S, United States, al Qaeda
The Rules Committee advanced a separate bill that would provide $1.9 billion in emergency funding for Capitol security, also opposed by Republicans. 2 House Republican, during a practice at a baseball field. The bill would establish a 10-member bipartisan commission to investigate the causes of the attack, security shortcomings and intelligence information. House Republicans last week ousted Representative Liz Cheney from their leadership for rejecting Trump's falsehoods. Republicans also opposed the $1.9 billion bill that would help pay for costs related to the attack and improve security at the Capitol complex.
Persons: Donald Trump's, Kevin McCarthy, Trump, Chuck Schumer, Mitch McConnell, McConnell, Lisa Murkowski, Repudiating, McCarthy, Nancy Pelosi, Joe Biden's, Donald Trump, Leah Millis Read, Steve Scalise, Tom Cole, Liz Cheney, Norma Torres Organizations: Capitol, Republican, Democratic, House Republican, Democrat, CNN, Republicans, House Homeland Security, Trump, U.S, REUTERS, National Guard, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, U.S, United States, al Qaeda
Trump, in a statement, urged Republicans not to approve the commission, calling it "just more partisan unfairness." The Rules Committee advanced a separate bill that would provide $1.9 billion in emergency funding for Capitol security, also opposed by Republicans. The bill would establish a 10-member bipartisan commission to investigate the causes of the attack, security shortcomings and intelligence information. House Republicans last week ousted Representative Liz Cheney from their leadership for rejecting Trump's falsehoods. Republicans also opposed the $1.9 billion bill that would help pay for costs related to the attack and improve security at the Capitol complex.
Persons: Donald Trump's, Kevin McCarthy, Trump, Chuck Schumer, Mitch McConnell, McConnell, Lisa Murkowski, Repudiating, McCarthy, Nancy Pelosi, Donald Trump, Leah Millis, Joe Biden's, Steve Scalise, Tom Cole, Liz Cheney, Norma Torres Organizations: Capitol, Republican, Democratic, House Republican, Democrat, CNN, Republicans, House Homeland Security, U.S, REUTERS, Trump, National Guard, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, U.S, United States, al Qaeda
Legislation creating a 9/11-style commission to investigate the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol by former President Donald Trump's supporters will take center stage in the House of Representatives this week as Democrats seek quick passage. Lawmakers have squabbled for months over the makeup and operation of the panel, with many Republicans downplaying the worst violence at the Capitol in modern history. During a House hearing last week, Republican Representative Andrew Clyde said it would be "a bold-faced lie" to label the events of Jan. 6 an "insurrection." Under the bill, Democrats and Republicans would have equal say over selecting commissioners and both sides would have to approve witness subpoenas. While House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy has not signed off on the bill, a spokeswoman for House Republican Whip Steve Scalise said his team would not pressure rank-and-file Republicans to vote against it.
Persons: Donald Trump's, Trump, Liz Cheney, Andrew Clyde, George Floyd's, Kevin McCarthy, Steve Scalise Organizations: U.S, Capitol, Capitol Police, Democratic, Republicans, National Guard, Republican, Thomson Locations: Congress, Minneapolis
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