Top related persons:
Top related locs:
Top related orgs:

Search resuls for: "Nepal"


25 mentions found


Nepal prime minister says the country's Covid situation has improved
  + stars: | 2021-06-14 | by ( ) www.cnbc.com sentiment -0.52   time to read: 1 min
Share Share Article via Facebook Share Article via Twitter Share Article via LinkedIn Share Article via EmailNepal prime minister says the country's Covid situation has improvedNepali Prime Minister Khadga Prasad Sharma Oli says the second wave of Covid infections in the country is under control, but Nepal now needs vaccines.
Persons: Khadga Prasad Sharma Oli Organizations: Nepal Locations: Nepal
According to Siu, concern about anti-Asian hate didn’t become mainstream until late last year or the beginning of this year, and many Asian Americans decided to move last summer. Some Asian Americans have opted to continue work or study at U.S.-based companies and universities, despite the 13- to 16-hour time difference. hile some moved abroad during the pandemic, Siu said only a fraction of the Asian American community is able to do so. t wasn’t every Asian American who can have access to that kind of mobility,” she said. She chose Nepal, where she’s been working remotely ever since, and her time there has changed her perspective on happiness and her Asian American identity.
Persons: Donald Trump, “ I’ve, ” KEFF, don’t, , Lok Siu, Siu, didn’t, Clara Park, , she’s reconsidering, Noniko Hsu, Hsu, Melody Chen, Melody Chen “, ” Chen, Anabelle, ” Pan, she’s, nny Huang, Tetching, hich, Wewdon't, Helen Li, ” Li, Li, Wen Liu Organizations: NBC Asian, Cannes Film, U.S, University of California, Yale University, ", “ Times, University of Michigan, Locations: United States, Taiwanese American, Taiwan, NBC Asian America, Taipei, , Asia, Berkeley, South Korea, Korea, Thailand, Kaohsiung, Singapore, U.S, American, transnationals, York, Nepal, New York
U.S. tire maker Goodyear loses dispute against foreign workers in Malaysia
  + stars: | 2021-06-10 | by ( Mei Mei Chu | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: +2 min
A logo of Goodyear is pictured at it's factory in Shah Alam, Malaysia May 6, 2021. Goodyear Malaysia argued that the migrant workers did not have legal standing to file the complaint as they were not union members, according to the court documents. "This is just the tip of the iceberg albeit a significant milestone in the treatment of migrant workers in this company," said the workers' lawyer Chandra Segaran Rajandran. The court has already ruled in favor of the foreign workers in two of the cases last year. Goodyear is also facing accusations of unlawful overtime, wrongful salary deduction, denying workers full access to their passports, and threats to migrant workers, Reuters has reported.
Persons: Lim Huey Teng, Goodyear, Rasidah Chik, Rasidah, Chandra Segaran Rajandran Organizations: Goodyear, REUTERS, Goodyear Tire &, Goodyear Malaysia, Industrial, Court, Reuters, Thomson Locations: Shah Alam, Malaysia, Malaysian, Goodyear Malaysia, Nepal, Myanmar, India
Supreme Court unanimously rules against immigrants with temporary status
  + stars: | 2021-06-07 | by ( ) www.nbcnews.com sentiment -0.96   time to read: +2 min
WASHINGTON — A unanimous Supreme Court ruled Monday that thousands of people living in the U.S. for humanitarian reasons are ineligible to apply to become permanent residents. Justice Elena Kagan wrote for the court that federal immigration law prohibits people who entered the country illegally and now have Temporary Protected Status from seeking “green cards” to remain in the country permanently. So the conferral of TPS does not make an unlawful entrant...eligible" for a green card, she wrote. Monday's decision does not affect immigrants with TPS who initially entered the U.S. legally and then, say, overstayed their visa, Kagan noted. Because those people were legally admitted to the country and later were given humanitarian protections, they can seek to become permanent residents.
Persons: WASHINGTON —, Elena Kagan, , , Kagan Organizations: TPS, Senate, Biden, U.S Locations: U.S, El Salvador, United States, Haiti, Honduras, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria, Venezuela, Yemen
U.S. Supreme Court blocks permanent residency for some immigrants
  + stars: | 2021-06-07 | by ( Andrew Chung | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +3 min
People walk past the U.S. Supreme Court the day the court is set to release orders and opinions in Washington, U.S., June 1, 2021. REUTERS/ERIN SCOTTCompanies Us Supreme Court See allThe U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to let immigrants who have been allowed to stay in the United States on humanitarian grounds apply to become permanent residents if they entered the country illegally, siding with President Joe Biden's administration. The case could affect thousands of immigrants, many of whom have lived in the United States for years. There are about 400,000 people in the United States with protected status, which prevents deportation and lets them work legally. They sued in federal court, saying that those with lawful status, including Temporary Protected Status recipients, are deemed to have been lawfully admitted, and may apply for permanent residency.
Persons: ERIN SCOTT, Joe Biden's, Biden, Donald Trump's, Elena Kagan, Jose Sanchez, Sonia Gonzalez, Kamala Harris Organizations: U.S, Supreme, REUTERS, ERIN SCOTT Companies, Republican, TPS, United, Circuit, El Locations: Washington , U.S, United States, El Salvador, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Haiti, Honduras, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Somalia, Sudan, South Sudan, Syria, Venezuela, Yemen, Guatemala
Besides, initial success at containing the coronavirus in Asia may have caused people to view vaccination with less urgency, he added. In short, Asia has gone from a poster child in containment success to a laggard in vaccination rollout. That's far below North America's roughly 61.4 doses per 100 people and Europe's 48.5 doses per 100 people, the data showed. Several frontier and emerging markets in Asia rely on COVAX — a global vaccine-sharing initiative — for Covid vaccines, according to a report by research firm Fitch Solutions. India is home to vaccine maker Serum Institute India, which is a major supplier of Covid doses to the initiative.
Persons: Noah Seelam, Benjamin Cowling, we've, , hesitancy, Cowling, CNBC's Organizations: AFP, Getty, The University of Hong Kong's School of Public Health, CNBC, Fitch Solutions, Serum Institute India Locations: Hyderabad, India, SINGAPORE, Asia, Pacific, Nepal, Malaysia, Japan, Taiwan, Africa, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam, Mongolia, Singapore, Afghanistan, COVAX, China
Cases are surging in parts of Asia and South America. All three nations are experiencing their worst coronavirus outbreaks since the start of the pandemic, joining countries across Asia and South America where infections have surged to record levels — a stark counterpoint to the optimism felt in the United States as summer dawns. In North America, 60 vaccine doses have been administered for every 100 people, compared with 27 in South America and 21 in Asia, according to New York Times data. “Global vaccine access has been woefully inequitable, with a handful of high-income countries dominating procurement agreements and receipt of initial batches,” Dr. Standley said. “The ongoing devastation being wreaked by Covid-19 in the Global South should be reason enough for the rich countries to want to enable a quick and cheap global vaccine rollout,” Dr. Richmond said.
Persons: Lim Huey Teng, , Claire Standley, Standley, Matthew Richmond, , Richmond, Dr, it’s Organizations: New York Times, Center for Global Health Science, Security, Georgetown University, Globally, London School of Economics Locations: Asia, South America, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Argentina, Nepal, United States, Malaysia South Africa, Thailand, Taiwan, Paraguay, Uruguay, Australia, Singapore, Europe, North America, Africa
Everest climbers struggle to return home amid Nepal COVID-19 travel curbs
  + stars: | 2021-06-02 | by ( Gopal Sharma | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: +2 min
Mount Everest, the world highest peak, and other peaks of the Himalayan range are seen through an aircraft window during a mountain flight from Kathmandu, Nepal January 15, 2020. REUTERS/Monika DeupalaClimbers returning from Mount Everest and other Himalayan peaks are struggling to find a return flight back home after Nepal banned most air travel to contain a surge in COVID-19 cases, mountaineering operators and hikers said on Wednesday. Nepal issued 742 permits – 408 of those to climbers aspiring to make it to the top of the world's highest peak, Mount Everest – in the April-May climbing season. And hundreds of climbers are now returning from the mountains before the onset of annual monsoon rains. "The situation could worsen as more climbers wind up their expeditions and return to Kathmandu in the next few days," Sherpa told Reuters.
Persons: Monika Deupala, Everest –, Tashi Lakpa Sherpa, Sherpa, Andrew Hughes, Hughes, Viridiana Alvarez, Alvarez, Raj Kumar Chettri, CAAN Organizations: Everest, REUTERS, Monika Deupala Climbers, Seven, Reuters, Qatar, Civil Aviation Authority of Nepal, Thomson Locations: Kathmandu, Nepal, Mount, China, India, Qatar, Turkey, United States
This is the case in Malaysia, Nepal and other nations in Asia. But in few places is the situation as bleak as South America, which has the highest rate of new infections in the world, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Uruguay, Argentina, Colombia and Paraguay have all ranked in the top 10 in cases per 100,000 residents over the past week. Social networks in Paraguay have become obituaries in motion: “Rest in peace professor,” reads one. But instead of reaching a peak, followed by a fall, new cases and deaths have surged — and then stayed there.
Persons: , , Castillo, Claudia López Organizations: Johns Hopkins University, Uruguay Locations: Malaysia, Nepal, Asia, South America, Argentina, Colombia, Paraguay, Buenos Aires, Colombia’s, Bogotá
'This time it's worse': Nepali billionaire on the country's second Covid wave
  + stars: | 2021-06-01 | by ( ) www.cnbc.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: 1 min
Share Share Article via Facebook Share Article via Twitter Share Article via LinkedIn Share Article via Email'This time it's worse': Nepali billionaire on the country's second Covid waveBinod Chaudhary of CG Corp Global says Nepal underestimated the intensity of its second wave of coronavirus infections.
Organizations: CG Corp Locations: Nepal
A woman sits at a bus stop outside Goodyear factory in Shah Alam, Malaysia May 6, 2021. The foreign workers are claiming about 5 million ringgit ($1.21 million) in unpaid wages, said their lawyer, Chandra Segaran Rajandran. According to the court ruling last year, Goodyear Malaysia argued that foreign workers are not entitled to the benefits of the collective agreement because they are not union members. The court agreed that the foreign workers’ job scope entitled them to those benefits. The foreign workers filed the first two lawsuits in July 2019.
Persons: Lim Huey Teng, Goodyear, payslips, Chandra Segaran Rajandran, , , Sharan Kumar Rai, Anna Ng Fui Choo Organizations: Reuters, Goodyear Tire &, Goodyear, REUTERS, Goodyear Malaysia, National Union of Employees, Manufacturing Rubber, Permodalan, Permodalan Nasional Berhad, Workers, Human Resources Ministry Locations: KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysian, Shah Alam, Malaysia, Nepal, Myanmar, India, Goodyear Malaysia, Permodalan Nasional, United States
Prakash Mathema | AFP | Getty ImagesNepal underestimated its second wave of Covid-19 infections and needs to step up its efforts to address the crisis, Nepali billionaire Binod Chaudhary said last week. "I must admit, we probably underestimated, as a nation, the intensity of the second wave," he told CNBC's "Street Signs Asia" on Friday. "We were counting on India," Chaudhary said. This country needs to be kept safe and protected. "This country needs to be kept safe and protected," he said.
Persons: Prakash Mathema, Binod Chaudhary, CNBC's, Chaudhary Organizations: AFP, Getty, Corp, Health, Bank, Global Locations: Kathmandu, Nepal, India, Inoculations, China
The allegations, which Reuters is the first to report, initially surfaced when 185 foreign workers filed three complaints against Goodyear Malaysia in the country's industrial court, two in 2019 and one in 2020, over non-compliance with a collective labour agreement. The foreign workers are claiming about 5 million ringgit ($1.21 million) in unpaid wages, said their lawyer, Chandra Segaran Rajandran. According to the court ruling last year, Goodyear Malaysia argued that foreign workers are not entitled to the benefits of the collective agreement because they are not union members. The court agreed that the foreign workers' job scope entitled them to those benefits. The foreign workers filed the first two lawsuits in July 2019.
Persons: Goodyear, payslips, Chandra Segaran Rajandran, Sharan Kumar Rai, Anna Ng Fui Choo Organizations: Goodyear Tire &, Reuters, Goodyear, Goodyear Malaysia, National Union of Employees, Manufacturing Rubber, Permodalan, Permodalan Nasional Berhad, Workers, Human Resources Ministry, Thomson Locations: Malaysian, Nepal, Myanmar, India, Goodyear Malaysia, Malaysia, Permodalan Nasional, United States
A healthworker prepares to inoculate an elderly woman with Parkinson's disease with Sinovac's CoronaVac vaccine against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) inside her home in Manila, Philippines, May 18, 2021. Daily COVID-19 cases in the Philippines averaged roughly 6,300 for May, down by a third from April, after the government reduced operating capacity of businesses and limited the movement of people. Travellers coming directly from those countries, or with a history of travel to any of them within the last 14 days, will be denied entry. The Philippines has reported 13 COVID-19 cases tied to the more infectious Indian variant known as B.1.617.2. The Philippines has the second-highest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths in Southeast Asia, next to Indonesia.
Persons: Eloisa Lopez, Rodrigo Duterte, Duterte Organizations: REUTERS, United Arab Emirates, Travellers, Thomson Locations: Manila, Philippines, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal, Oman, Southeast Asia, Indonesia
Nepal’s Covid Crisis Worsens as Workers Pay the Price
  + stars: | 2021-05-30 | by ( Bhadra Sharma | Mujib Mashal | ) www.nytimes.com sentiment -0.99   time to read: +1 min
KATHMANDU, Nepal — Ram Singh Karki escaped the first wave of India’s pandemic by boarding a crowded bus and crossing the border home to Nepal. Then India was swept by a second wave, and Mr. Karki wasn’t as lucky. When his oxygen level dropped, his manager arranged for an ambulance to take him back to the border. Nepal is now considering declaring a health emergency as the virus rampages virtually unchecked across the impoverished nation of 30 million people. Carried by returning migrant workers and others, a vicious second wave has stretched the country’s medical system beyond its meager limits.
Persons: Nepal — Ram Singh Karki, Karki wasn’t Locations: KATHMANDU, Nepal, New Delhi, India
Tired but safe: Everest record-making climbers return
  + stars: | 2021-05-30 | by ( Gopal Sharma | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +2 min
Record-setting climbers of Mount Everest said on Sunday they were too tired after scaling the world’s highest peak to map out their future climbing plans. Tsang Yin-Hung, 45, a former teacher from Hong Kong, became the fastest woman to scale the peak, breaking 26 hours. Usually climbers spend several days in different camps before reaching the peak. China's Zhang Hong, 46, became Asia's first blind man, and the world's third, to scale the peak from the Nepal side. He said he was not scared despite reports of a COVID-19 outbreak at the base camp because he was vaccinated before reaching Nepal and had followed health protocols.
Persons: Mount Everest, Arthur Muir, Tsang, Zhang Hong, Muir, , Kong's Tsang, Chitrakar Read, Bill Burke, Phunjo, , Organizations: Everest, REUTERS, Thomson Locations: Mount, Chicago, American, Hong Kong, Nepal, Kathmandu, South America, Alaska
REUTERS/Navesh Chitrakar/File PhotoCoronavirus infections in the South Asia region surpassed 30 million on Friday, according to a Reuters tally of official data, led by India which is struggling with a second COVID-19 wave and a vaccine shortage across the region. The South Asia region - India, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Bhutan, Nepal, Maldives and Sri Lanka - accounts for 18% of global cases and almost 10% of deaths. To meet domestic demand, India temporarily halted vaccine exports in March after donating or selling more than 66 million doses. loadingAs of Friday, India has reported nearly 27.6 million cases and 318,895 deaths. At least 219.17 million vaccine doses have been administered in southern Asia by Friday, according to figures from Our World in Data.
Persons: Navesh, Covaxin, Narendra Modi, Johnson Organizations: REUTERS, AstraZeneca, Serum Institute of India, Bharat Biotech, Sputnik, Pfizer, World Health Organisation, GAVI Vaccine, Thomson Locations: South Asia, Kathmandu, Nepal, India, Asia, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Bhutan, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Africa, Mumbai, COVID, China
U.S. and Hong Kong climbers set new records on Mount Everest
  + stars: | 2021-05-28 | by ( Gopal Sharma | ) www.reuters.com + 0.97   time to read: +1 min
Mount Everest, the world highest peak, and other peaks of the Himalayan range are seen through an aircraft window during a mountain flight from Kathmandu, Nepal January 15, 2020. REUTERS/Monika Deupala/File PhotoClimbers from the United States and Hong Kong have set new records as they scaled Mount Everest this week, hiking officials said on Friday. "Arthur Muir is the oldest American at 75 years old to summit Mount Everest," Garrett Madison, expedition leader at the Madison Mountaineering company told Reuters from the base camp. Muir beat the record set by Bill Burke, who became the oldest American to climb the mountain at the age of 67 in 2009. She beat the record set by Nepali woman Phunjo Jhangmu Lama in 2017, who climbed Everest in 39 hours and 6 minutes.
Persons: Monika Deupala, Arthur Muir, Kong's Tsang, Garrett Madison, Muir, Bill Burke, Tsang, Gyanendra Shrestha, Phunjo Organizations: Everest, REUTERS, Madison Mountaineering, Reuters, Thomson Locations: Kathmandu, Nepal, United States, Hong Kong, American
KOLKATA, India (Reuters) - More than 150,000 people were left homeless in the aftermath of a cyclone that unleashed storm surges in eastern India and Bangladesh, officials said on Thursday, with heavy rains hampering relief work in some low-lying coastal areas. “Restoration work will be difficult unless the weather improves,” West Bengal state minister Bankim Hazra told Reuters. Some 500,000 people were sheltered in relief camps in West Bengal and officials said they had taken steps to reduce the risk of a potential spread of the virus. Authorities in Bangladesh reported flooding of villages due to torrential rains and tidal surges. Elsewhere on the sub-continent, Nepal was bracing for floods in its plains and landslides in the hills as heavy rains have lashed the Himalayan country since Wednesday and were forecast to last till Saturday.
Persons: Bankim Hazra, Hazra, Indranil Bargi, , , Humayum Kabir Organizations: Cyclone, , Reuters, Authorities, Disaster Management Agency Locations: KOLKATA, India, Bangladesh, Bengal, India’s West Bengal, West Bengal, ” West Bengal, Gosaba, Khulna, Nepal
Cyclone Yaas ripped through the eastern Indian state of Odisha on Wednesday packing gusts of up to 140 kph (87 mph) and whipping up tidal surges in neighbouring West Bengal state and Bangladesh even though they were not directly in its path. Relief workers delivered food and water to people marooned in 124 villages in Odisha, the state's top bureaucrat Suresh Mahapatra said. Some 500,000 people were sheltered in relief camps in West Bengal and officials said they had taken steps to reduce the risk of a potential spread of the virus. 1/9 A man removes bamboo rooftop of a damaged hut following Cyclone Yaas in Digha, Purba Medinipur district, in the eastern state of West Bengal, India, May 27, 2021. Authorities in Bangladesh reported flooding of villages due to heavy rains and tidal surges.
Persons: Cyclone, Suresh Mahapatra, Indranil Bargi, Chowdhuri, Humayum Kabir, Yaas Organizations: Reuters, REUTERS, Chowdhuri Read, Authorities, Disaster Management Agency, Management Authority, Thomson Locations: India, Bangladesh, Odisha, West Bengal, Gosaba, Digha, Purba Medinipur, Khulna, Jharkhand, Nepal
Renewed Covid outbreak in Asia is not a big worry, says Citi strategist
  + stars: | 2021-05-26 | by ( Yen Nee Lee | ) www.cnbc.com sentiment -0.97   time to read: +1 min
The renewed rise in Covid-19 cases across Asia is not a big worry and the region's economy will get back on track when the outbreak eases, said an investment strategist from Citi Private Bank. Against such a backdrop, investors could go after "Covid-impaired" stocks such as airlines and other companies in the travel and leisure sector, said Ken Peng, the bank's head of Asia investment strategy. Peng told CNBC's "Capital Connection" on Tuesday that Asia is not experiencing a resurgence in Covid for the first time. So I think that's not something we need to worry about too extensively," he added. Over in India, which has the world's second-worst outbreak, daily cases have remained elevated although trending lower from record-high levels in early May, the data showed.
Persons: Ken Peng, Peng, CNBC's, Indranil Mukherjee Organizations: Citi Private Bank, AFP, Getty, Johns Hopkins University Locations: Covid, Asia, Mumbai, Nepal, Malaysia, Taiwan, India, China
The 36-year-old mother-of-three died the previous night in a village in the mountainous northern state of Uttarakhand, a day after testing positive for COVID-19. India's COVID-19 caseload stands at 27.16 million, with 311,388 deaths, federal government data from May 26 show. Devi tested positive for COVID-19 with very low blood oxygen levels. Another patient was using the oxygen cylinder and the oxygen concentrator did not work due to a power outage. "He asked me if I was willing to take care of his household expenses if he tested positive."
Persons: Pramila Devi, Aishwary Anand, Anand, Siddiqui, India's, Suresh Kumar, Devi, Kumar, jostling, We've, Manoj Kumar Sharma, Jai Prakash, Deepak Singh Organizations: REUTERS, Reuters, Thomson Locations: Kaljikhal, Uttarakhand, India, China, Nepal, Haridwar, Uttarakhand's, Garhwal, Tangroli, New Delhi
ArgentinaCumulative cases: More than 3.5 million as of May 23, according to Hopkins data. NepalCumulative cases: More than 513,000 as of May 23, according to Hopkins data. BahrainCumulative cases: More than 218,000 as of May 23, according to Hopkins data. TaiwanCumulative cases: More than 4,300 as of May 23, according to Hopkins data. Cumulative deaths: At least 23 as of May 23, Hopkins data showed.
Persons: Sunil Pradhan, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, it's, Alberto Fernandez, Dr, Samir Kumar Adhikari, Hopkins Organizations: Anadolu Agency, Getty, India, Johns Hopkins University, Dr, World Health Organization, Hopkins, Reuters, NBC, AstraZeneca, Serum Institute of, Pfizer, BioNTech, China National Pharmaceutical Group Locations: Kathmandu, Nepal, Argentina, Latin America, Asia, India, vaccinating, Africa, Data, Covid, Nepalese, Serum Institute of India, Bahrain, China, Israel, Taiwan
The variant has begun to outpace other versions of the virus in Britain, illustrating the risks of a faltering global immunization drive. Helpfully for Britain and other wealthy nations, the variant has emerged at a less dire moment of the pandemic. More than four out of every five people in England above age 65 have been given both doses of a coronavirus vaccine, driving down hospitalizations and deaths. The AstraZeneca-Oxford vaccine was 60 percent effective against the variant from India, compared with 66 percent against the one first seen in Britain. For now, a rise in cases of the variant from India has not caused an overall surge in the virus in Britain.
Persons: Andrew Testa, Helpfully, Andrew Rambaut, , , Robert Challen Organizations: The New York Times, Public Health, Pfizer, AstraZeneca, Oxford, University of Edinburgh, Twitter, Bolton, University of Exeter Locations: Britain, Brent, London, India, Southeast Asia, Nepal, England, Scotland, transmissibility
REUTERS/Navesh ChitrakarA Nepali Sherpa, who has climbed Mount Everest a record 25 times, said on Tuesday he had a dream in which a "mountain goddess" warned him from making another ascent this month. Kami Rita Sherpa, 51, scaled the 8,848.86-metre (29,031.69-foot) mountain via the traditional southeast ridge route on May 7, breaking his own record with a 25th ascent. He was accompanied on the world's highest mountain by 11 other Sherpa climbers, who formed part of a rope fixing team. He did not say what the dream was but felt the mountain goddess did not want him to make another attempt on the peak. Everest was first conquered by New Zealander Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay in 1953.
Persons: Rita Sherpa, Sherpas, Kami, Everest, New Zealander Sir Edmund Hillary, Tenzing Organizations: REUTERS, Sherpa, Everest, New Zealander, Tenzing Norgay, Thomson Locations: Nepali, Kathmandu, Nepal
Total: 25