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[1/7] U.S. Rep. Hakeem Jefferies (D-NY) walks on the day of House Democratic leadership elections on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., November 30, 2022. The vote by Jeffries' fellow Democrats also marked the rise of a younger generation of leaders in the 435-member House and the end of the Nancy Pelosi era. In 2007 she became the first woman to be elected House speaker. Jeffries, a 52-year-old New Yorker, will hold the position of House Democratic leader for the 118th Congress that convenes on Jan. 3. Democratic Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said he was not surprised that Jeffries, a fellow Brooklynite, was chosen.
WASHINGTON, Nov 30 (Reuters) - A U.S. House of Representatives committee has obtained access to Donald Trump's tax returns, following a years-long court fight with the Republican former president who has accused the Democratic-led panel of being politically motivated. The Ways and Means Committee obtained the tax returns following a Supreme Court decision clearing their release. The panel will have little time to do its work, with Republicans poised to take the House majority in January. It had long been customary, though not required, for major party presidential candidates to release their returns. The committee first requested Trump's returns in 2019.
Here is what they said about supporting the Respect for Marriage Act, which some social conservatives object to:SUSAN COLLINS, MAINECollins is one of the most moderate Senate Republicans. LISA MURKOWSKI, ALASKAMurkowski, a moderate Senate Republican, was the third Republican senator in 2013 to come out in support of same-sex marriage. DAN SULLIVAN, ALASKASullivan said he disagreed with the 2015 Supreme Court decision that established the national right to same-sex marriage. CYNTHIA LUMMIS, WYOMINGAlthough she also believes in "traditional" marriage, Lummis said she believed the separation of church and state was more important than individual religious opinions. She told Politico that although she believes "in traditional marriage," her stance evolved with growing popular support for same-sex marriage.
WASHINGTON, Nov 30 (Reuters) - A U.S. House of Representatives committee has obtained Donald Trump's tax returns, following a years-long court fight with the Republican former president who has accused the Democratic-led panel of being politically motivated. The Ways and Means Committee obtained the tax returns following a Supreme Court decision clearing their release. The panel will have little time to do its work, with Republicans poised to take the House majority in January. It had long been customary, though not required, for major party presidential candidates to release their returns. The committee first requested Trump's returns in 2019.
It would not bar states from blocking same-sex or interracial marriages if the Supreme Court allowed them to do so. A similar, but not identical, bill passed the House of Representatives earlier this year with support from 47 Republicans and all Democrats. The House would need to approve the Senate version before it is sent to President Joe Biden to sign into law. In June, the Supreme Court overturned the nationwide right to an abortion, undoing 50 years of precedent. In a concurring opinion, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas wrote the court should consider reversing other decisions protecting individual freedoms, including the 2015 ruling on gay marriage.
WASHINGTON, Nov 23 (Reuters) - Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski and Democratic Representative Mary Peltola of Alaska both won reelection against opponents backed by Donald Trump on Wednesday, the latest high-profile defeats of candidates supported by the former president. Murkowski, 65, has represented Alaska in the Senate since 2002 and built an independent profile as one of the chamber's few centrists. Peltola, the first Alaska Native elected to Congress, beat two Republicans: former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin and businessman Nick Begich. Tea Party era of politics and helped pave the way for Trump to win the White House. Murkowski and Peltola would have won even under Alaska's old election rules, as they had each won a plurality of votes.
Democrat Peltola re-elected to U.S. House in Alaska
  + stars: | 2022-11-24 | by ( ) www.reuters.com   time to read: +2 min
WASHINGTON, Nov 23 (Reuters) - U.S. Representative Mary Peltola of Alaska, a Democrat first elected in August, was reelected to a full two-year term on Wednesday, beating two Republicans, former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin and businessman Nick Begich. Peltola came out on top after Alaska finished tabulating all ballots in a publicly broadcast session using its new "ranked choice" system, which allows voters to list candidates in order of preference. Peltola would have won even under the old system, as she had a significant plurality against Palin and Begich from the first count. Tea Party era of politics and helped pave the way for Donald Trump to win the White House. Peltola, the first Alaska Native elected to Congress, was endorsed by the state's longtime U.S. senator, Lisa Murkowski, a moderate Republican, as well as the staff of Republican former U.S. Representative Don Young, Peltola's predecessor.
WASHINGTON, Nov 23 (Reuters) - Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska has won reelection, defeating Kelly Tshibaka, a former Republican state official who was endorsed by former President Donald Trump, a tabulation carried out by state officials showed on Wednesday. Murkowski, 65, has represented Alaska in the Senate since 2002 and has built an independent profile as one of the chamber's few centrists. Murkowski defeated Tshibaka after Alaska finished tabulating all ballots in a publicly broadcast session using its new "ranked choice" system, which allows voters to list candidates in order of preference. The candidate with a majority of votes after all ballots have been counted wins. She won reelection as a write-in candidate in 2010 after her party nominated a more right-wing contender.
"There is a way that we can forward those tax returns to the House, and the House can act on this. A Ways and Means Committee spokesperson did not respond to a request for comment on the panel's plans. Those two committees are among three in Congress whose chairs can receive individual tax returns upon request under federal law. "The Supreme Court has no idea what their inaction unleashes," Representative Kevin Brady, the top Ways and Means Republican, said in a statement. Committee members will consider what information related to Trump's tax returns can be made public when Congress returns to work next week.
Nov 19 (Reuters) - Two men were arrested at New York's Penn Station in connection with threats to the Jewish community, police said on Saturday. New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) officers identified the two men late on Friday night after being alerted to warrants for their arrests by the FBI/NYPD Joint Terrorism Task Force, the MTA said in a statement. Police seized a hunting knife, an illegal Glock 17 firearm and a 30-round magazine after investigating the individuals. No details were released on the two men, although the New York Times reported authorities released an alert late on Friday for a man who had recently made threats against synagogues in the New York area. A joint investigation for a "strong prosecution" is now taking place, and NYPD officers are deploying to "strategic locations" around the city, Sewell said.
[1/3] U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert (R-CO) waves after speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Dallas, Texas, U.S., August 6, 2022. REUTERS/Brian SnyderNov 18 (Reuters) - U.S. Representative Lauren Boebert, the polarizing Republican who gained national notoriety during her first term with her combative brand of politics, won re-election in a surprisingly close race after her Democratic opponent conceded on Friday. House Republicans will be able to block much of Democratic President Joe Biden's agenda. She went on to defeat a five-term incumbent Republican in that year's primary and won the seat in the general election. On Friday, Boebert wrote on Twitter that Frisch had called her to concede and added, "I look forward to getting past election season and focusing on conservative governance in the House majority.
It would serve as a legal backstop against any future Supreme Court action by requiring the federal government to recognize any marriage that was legal in the state it was performed. It would not block states from banning same-sex or interracial marriages if the Supreme Court allows them to do so. All 50 Democrats and 12 Republican senators voted to advance the bill in the 100-member Senate. Speaking before Wednesday's vote, Republican Senator Thom Tillis, another key negotiator, called the bill "a good compromise... based on mutual respect for our fellow Americans." In a mark of how far the country has moved on the issue, the Mormon church - once a virulent opponent of legalizing same-sex marriage - came out in support of the bill.
Jeffries, 52, would be the first Black House Democratic leader, representing both the party's diverse voter base and bringing a new generation of leadership. House Democrats are scheduled to vote on their leaders on Nov. 30. Jeffries, who has held the leadership post of House Democratic Caucus chairman since 2019, also would represent a stylistic contrast to Pelosi, who made her announcement on Thursday. Current House Democratic Leader Steny Hoyer, 83, said he would not seek a leadership position in the next Congress and backed Jeffries. Clyburn told reporters ahead of Pelosi's announcement that he intends to remain in the House Democratic leadership regardless of the path she takes.
WASHINGTON, Nov 17 (Reuters) - A U.S. House of Representatives committee will release its report probing the Jan. 6, 2021, assault on the Capitol by former President Donald Trump supporters next month, the Democratic chair said on Thursday. The select committee's work will likely end in January when a new Republican-controlled Congress is sworn in. The committee's public hearings in which it questioned former Republican aides and key White House staff about the lead up to the riot shed light on Trump's role in provoking the unprecedented assault on the Capitol. The riot was intended to stop Congress from certifying President Joe Biden's 2020 win, which Trump falsely claims was the result of widespread fraud. Trump this week launched a new run for the White House in 2024.
WASHINGTON, Nov 16 (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate on Wednesday will hold an initial vote on legislation to protect the right to same-sex marriage, spurred by concerns that a conservative Supreme Court could reverse its earlier decision that made it legal nationwide. The bill, which is expected to pass the Senate, would serve as a legal backstop against any future Supreme Court action by requiring the federal government recognize any marriage that was legal in the state it was performed. However, it would not block states from banning same-sex or interracial marriages if the Supreme Court allows them to do so. Supporters of same-sex marriage were spurred to act when Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas wrote that the court should also reconsider the legality of same-sex marriage, in a concurring opinion to the court's overturning of federal protections for abortion in June. The bill will have to jump through several more procedural hoops in the Senate before going back to the House for final approval.
REUTERS/Jonathan ErnstWASHINGTON, Nov 14 (Reuters) - Democrats in the U.S. Congress aim to pass bills protecting same-sex marriage, clarifying lawmakers' role in certifying presidential elections and raising the nation's debt ceiling when they return from the campaign trail on Monday. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen both signaled that addressing the nations' looming debt ceiling would be a priority during the session. Some Republicans have threatened to use the next hike in the $31.4 trillion debt ceiling, expected in the first quarter of 2023, as leverage to force concessions from Biden. Pelosi, who would lose her position as speaker if Republicans win a majority in the House, told ABC News on Sunday that the best way to address the debt ceiling was "to do it now." "We'll have to, again, lift the debt ceiling so that the full faith and credit of the United States is respected."
Control of the Senate - and the shape of President Joe Biden's next two years in office - will now hinge on contests in Nevada and Georgia. Democrats needed one more seat for control, since Vice President Kamala Harris can cast the tie-breaking vote. Political analysts anticipate a rush of campaign funds into Georgia as Republicans and Democrats gear up for the final battle of the 2022 midterm elections. In the fight for control of the House of Representatives, Republicans were inching closer to becoming the majority and ending four years of rule by Democrats. The Republican House leader, Kevin McCarthy, has already announced his intention to run for speaker if Republicans take over, an outcome he has described as inevitable.
House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy had hoped to celebrate a resounding victory that would propel him into the top job of speaker. But Republican hopes for a "red wave" of victories faded as Democrats showed surprising resilience in several key races. Pelosi said in a statement, "It is clear that House Democratic members and candidates are strongly outperforming expectations around the country." [1/9] Supporters cheer U.S. House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) at a House Republicans' party held late on the night of the 2022 U.S. midterm elections in Washington, U.S., November 9, 2022. The Georgia Senate race could end up in a Dec. 6 runoff, possibly with Senate control at stake.
By early Wednesday, Republicans had flipped six Democratic House seats, Edison Research projected, one more than the minimum they need to take over the chamber. But Republican hopes for a "red wave" of victories faded as Democrats showed surprising resilience in several key races. Pelosi said in a statement, "It is clear that House Democratic members and candidates are strongly outperforming expectations around the country." But television host and heart surgeon Mehmet Oz failed to win his Pennsylvania Senate race. In Pennsylvania, Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano, who sought to overturn the state's election results after Trump lost, was defeated by Democrat Josh Shapiro.
In the House of Representatives, Republicans remained favored to win a majority that would allow them to halt Biden's legislative agenda. By early Wednesday, the party had flipped six Democratic House seats, Edison Research projected, one more than the minimum they need to take over the chamber. But Republican hopes for a "red wave" of victories faded as Democrats showed surprising resilience in several key races. The Democratic speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, said in a statement, "It is clear that House Democratic members and candidates are strongly outperforming expectations around the country." Voter anger over the Supreme Court's June decision to overturn the nationwide right to abortion helped Democrats to curb their losses.
SummarySummary Companies Key House, Senate races still too close to callRepublican-controlled Congress would stymie Biden agendaPHOENIX, Ariz./BIRMINGHAM, Mich., Nov 8 (Reuters) - Control of Congress was up for grabs after Tuesday's U.S. midterm elections with many of the most competitive races uncalled, leaving it unclear whether Republicans would seize control from President Joe Biden's Democrats. In the House of Representatives, Republicans had been favored to win a majority that would allow them to halt Biden's legislative agenda. By early Wednesday, the party had flipped four Democratic House seats, Edison Research projected, one short of the number they need to take over the chamber. The Georgia Senate race could end up in a Dec. 6 runoff, possibly with Senate control at stake. Democrats currently control the 50-50 Senate with Vice President Kamala Harris able to break any ties.
REUTERS/Michael Patacsil/WASHINGTON, Oct 28 (Reuters) - A U.S. judge has rejected a request for a temporary restraining order against a group accused of alleged voter intimidation, according to a ruling released on Friday. Judge Michael Liburdi, who was appointed by former President Donald Trump to the federal court in Arizona, rejected the request against Clean Elections USA and its founder, Melody Jennings. A lawyer who represented Clean Elections USA and Jennings in a hearing earlier this week did not immediately respond to a request for comment. He also dismissed Voto Latino from the case, stating he did not think the organization proved it would be harmed financially by Clean Election USA's actions. "We continue to believe that Clean Elections USA's intimidation and harassment is unlawful."
REUTERS/Cheney Orr/File PhotoWASHINGTON, Oct 26 (Reuters) - Two in five U.S. voters say they are worried about threats of violence or voter intimidation at polling stations during the country's midterm elections, according to a new Reuters/Ipsos poll. But officials in Arizona, a key battleground, have already asked the federal government to probe a case of possible voter intimidation, after people casting ballots were conspicuously filmed and followed. Kathy Boockvar, a former top election official for Pennsylvania, said fears of voter intimidation and violence run counter to American tradition. Among the registered voters polled by Reuters/Ipsos, 43% were concerned about threats of violence or voter intimidation while voting in person. About two-thirds of Republicans and one-third of Democrats think voter fraud is a widespread problem, the Reuters/Ipsos poll found.
WASHINGTON, Oct 25 (Reuters) - Two U.S. voter-rights organizations have asked a federal judge to temporarily stop a grassroots group from monitoring voter drop boxes in Arizona for alleged voter fraud, the week after state officials asked federal prosecutors to probe the group for possible voter intimidation. Clean Elections USA describes itself as a "grassroots organization committed to election integrity." Arizona's secretary of state last week asked the U.S. Department of Justice to probe a case of possible voter intimidation after a group of people linked to Clean Elections followed and filmed a voter dropping off a ballot. Clean Elections USA is running a "coordinated campaign of vigilante voter intimidation" that violates the Voting Rights Act and the Klu Klux Klan Act, the lawsuit said. The lawsuit asks U.S. District Judge Michael Liburdi, a Trump appointee, to impose a temporary restraining order blocking Clean Elections' ballot-monitoring activities.
WASHINGTON, Oct 14 (Reuters) - A group of U.S. Senate Democrats sounded the alarm over a lack of election workers ahead of the Nov. 8 midterm voting, citing threats and harassment as hurdles to recruiting crucial staff. In an Oct. 6 letter to the U.S. Election Assistance Commission, 13 Senate Democrats and two independents aligned with Democrats called for the federal agency to step up efforts to support states in recruiting workers needed to run next month's midterm elections. Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com Register"Recruitment efforts have been further hampered by the increase in threats and harassment targeting election workers," the letter stated. Threats against poll workers have sharply increased since the lead up to the 2020 election, when former President Donald Trump began making unfounded claims about massive election fraud. Reuters documented more than 850 threats and hostile messages to election workers and officials nationwide in a series of investigative reports.
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