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Search resuls for: "Luciana Magalhaes"


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BRASÍLIA—It was supposed to have been a peaceful day, though police expected demonstrations on the vast, grassy Esplanade where Brazil’s three branches of power are located. Adilson Paz said goodbye to his two teenage boys and headed to work as chief of the legislative police at the modernist lower house of Congress. He said he thought he would be home by dark that Sunday, Jan. 8.
BRASÍLIA—The Brazilian official in charge of the capital’s security at the time of Sunday’s riots surrendered to police Saturday morning as judicial authorities investigate what they say are a web of suspects intent on overthrowing President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva . Anderson Torres, who previously was justice minister under the right-wing government of former President Jair Bolsonaro , arrived in Brasília shortly after 7 a.m. from the U.S., where he had been on vacation since last week.
Former Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro used the example of the U.S. Capitol attack to argue for getting rid of Brazil’s electronic voting system. BRASÍLIA—Brazil’s Supreme Court authorized Friday an investigation into former President Jair Bolsonaro over accusations he incited last weekend’s riots by asserting the election that removed him from office was rigged. Before the Oct. 30 vote won by leftist candidateLuiz Inácio Lula da Silva , Mr. Bolsonaro, a conservative, warned about the potential for voter fraud and some of his supporters say they don’t believe Mr. da Silva is the country’s legitimate president. Mr. Bolsonaro hasn’t conceded defeat.
Former Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro used the example of the U.S. Capitol attack to argue for getting rid of Brazil’s electronic voting system. BRASÍLIA—Brazilian prosecutors on Friday accused former President Jair Bolsonaro of inciting last weekend’s riots by asserting the election that removed him from office was rigged, and asked the country’s Supreme Court to authorize an investigation of him. Before the Oct. 30 vote won by leftist candidateLuiz Inácio Lula da Silva , Mr. Bolsonaro, a conservative, warned about the potential for voter fraud and some of his supporters say they don’t believe Mr. da Silva is the country’s legitimate president. Mr. Bolsonaro hasn’t conceded defeat.
BRASÍLIA—The Supreme Court on Wednesday extended the powers of local authorities in Brazil to control antigovernment protests, as authorities braced for further turmoil around the country after Sunday’s attacks in the capital. The decision came as prosecutors requested a freeze on the assets of the country’s right-wing former president, Jair Bolsonaro . His successor, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , has accused Mr. Bolsonaro of inspiring his supporters to riot in the capital on Sunday. Mr. Bolsonaro hasn’t conceded defeat in the Oct. 30 presidential election, in which Mr. da Silva won 50.9% of the vote.
BRASÍLIA—Brazil’s Supreme Court said Tuesday it ordered the arrest of the secretary in charge of public security in the capital and the military police commander in the city at the time of Sunday’s riots. Television images on Tuesday showed police emerging from the Brasília home of Anderson Torres, who was fired Sunday as public security secretary in Brasília’s federal district after rioters stormed the presidential palace, Congress and the Supreme Court in what President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva had described as an attempted coup.
BRASÍLIA—As rioters calling for the ousting of Brazil’s newly elected leftist president ransacked the capital Sunday, many Brazilians wondered whether the country’s right-leaning military would step in and stop the violence. By Sunday evening, they had their answer: Following the orders of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , the army and military police had restored order in the city, despite having many vocal supporters of the right-wing former president, Jair Bolsonaro , in their ranks.
BRASÍLIA—Brazilian authorities said Tuesday they have identified individuals in 10 states across the country who financed Sunday’s attacks on government buildings, as investigators probe links between the protests and the nation’s powerful agribusiness sector. Brazil’s Justice Minister Flávio Dino said Monday that it was indisputable that people linked to agribusiness took part in Sunday’s acts, but warned against accusing the entire sector of involvement.
BRASÍLIA—Brazilian authorities detained about 1,500 supporters of former President Jair Bolsonaro who had participated in riots that targeted the Congress and other buildings, as the government expanded an investigation into the mob and who might have financed it. Protesters supporting Mr. Bolsonaro forced their way into the presidential palace, Congress and Supreme Court in the capital on Sunday, many calling for military intervention to oust Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , a standard-bearer of the Latin American left who took office a week ago. Mr. da Silva wasn’t in Brasília at the time.
BRASÍLIA—Brazilian authorities detained more than 1,000 supporters of former President Jair Bolsonaro and removed Brasília’s federal district governor, a key ally, from his post Monday after protesters stormed the presidential palace a day earlier in what officials said was an attempt to overthrow the country’s newly-elected president. Protesters supporting the army captain-turned-politician forced their way into the presidential palace, Congress and the Supreme Court in the capital on Sunday afternoon, many calling for military intervention to oust Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , a standard-bearer of the Latin American left who took office a week ago.
BRASÍLIA—Brazil’s Supreme Court on Monday ordered the removal of Brasília’s federal district governor from his post after thousands of protesters stormed the presidential palace a day earlier in what officials said was an attempt to overthrow the country’s newly-elected leftist president. Protesters supporting Brazil’s former President Jair Bolsonaro forced their way into the presidential palace, Congress and the Supreme Court in the capital on Sunday afternoon, many calling for military intervention to oust Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , who took office a week ago.
Protesters stormed the presidential palace, Congress and the Supreme Court in Brazil’s capital on Sunday. BRASÍLIA—Brazil’s Supreme Court ordered Monday that the governor of the federal district of Brasília be removed from his post after thousands of protesters stormed the presidential palace here Sunday in what officials said was an attempt to overthrow the country’s newly-elected leftist president. Protesters supporting Brazil’s former President Jair Bolsonaro forced their way into the presidential palace, Congress and the Supreme Court in the capital Sunday afternoon, many calling for military intervention to oust Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , who took office a week ago.
Congressman-elect George Santos of New York, looking to the side, attended the opening session of the 118th Congress in the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday. Embattled Rep.-elect George Santos (R, N.Y.) spent his first day in Congress dodging reporters and voting in the contentious race for speaker, while Brazilian authorities said they intended to reopen a criminal investigation into allegations that he committed check fraud there in 2008. Mr. Santos, a 34-year-old who won a narrow victory for Republicans in a district of Long Island usually dominated by the Democrats, has faced scrutiny in recent weeks after admitting that he had lied to voters about his work and education history.
Congressman-elect George Santos of New York, looking to the side, attended the opening session of the 118th Congress in the U.S. Capitol on Tuesday. SÃO PAULO—Brazilian authorities said they intend to reopen a criminal investigation into Rep.-elect George Santos of New York over charges that he committed check fraud in 2008 in Brazil—a case that had been suspended because police had been unable to find him. Mr. Santos, a 34-year-old Republican who takes his seat in Congress on Tuesday, has faced criticism in recent weeks from Democrats and prosecutors after admitting that he had lied to voters about his work and education history.
A shooting club in São Paulo. Many Brazilians say they should be allowed to possess firearms in the face of violence by heavily-armed criminal gangs. BRASÍLIA—In his first hours as Brazil’s new president, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva issued sweeping changes to tighten the country’s firearms laws and reverse looser rules imposed by his predecessor, Jair Bolsonaro , that prompted a million new gun registrations since 2019. A presidential decree, which took effect Monday, suspends new registrations of guns for hunting and sport as the leftist government works to rewrite the country’s 20-year-old gun laws. The decree forbids owners from transporting loaded weapons, suspends new applications for gun clubs and reduces the number of firearms permitted per individual from six to three.
BRASÍLIA— Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , the 77-year-old standard-bearer of Latin America’s left, returned to power Sunday, 12 years after his last stint as president. This time around he faces some of his toughest challenges yet, from uniting a bitterly divided nation to halting the destruction of the world’s biggest rainforest and boosting the incomes of millions of desperately poor families. Thousands of supporters, many singing and waving the crimson flag of the Workers’ Party, joined dignitaries from across the Americas in the capital for the inauguration and a festival of open-air concerts to celebrate the return of Mr. da Silva, known popularly as Lula.
BRASÍLIA— Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , the 77-year-old icon of the Latin American left, returned to power Sunday, 12 years after his last stint as president. This time around he faces some of his toughest challenges yet, from uniting a bitterly divided nation to halting the destruction of the world’s biggest rainforest and boosting the incomes of millions of desperately poor families. Thousands of supporters, many singing and waving the Workers’ Party crimson flag, joined dignitaries from across the Americas in the capital for the inauguration and a festival of open-air concerts to celebrate Mr. da Silva’s return.
BRASÍLIA— Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , the 77-year-old icon of the Latin American left, returns to power Sunday afternoon 12 years after his last stint as president and this time faces some of his toughest challenges yet, from uniting a bitterly divided nation to halting the destruction of the world’s biggest rainforest and boosting the incomes of millions of desperately poor families. Thousands of supporters and dignitaries from across the Americas are expected to descend on this capital for the inauguration and open-air concerts to celebrate Mr. da Silva’s return. “We will make this country smile again, allow people to live in peace again,” Mr. da Silva said via Twitter in some of his last comments before he was sworn in. “We will bring back the harmony of the people.”
Mr. Santos, 34 years old, won a New York seat that had previously been held by a Democrat and is set to be sworn into Congress on Jan. 3. The district attorney of Nassau County, N.Y., said Wednesday her office is investigating Mr. Santos. Mr. Santos has said he was born in Queens, N.Y., to Brazilian parents and has dual U.S.-Brazilian citizenship. He said his father’s parents were Brazilian and his mother’s family was Jewish and had fled persecution in Europe. Mr. Santos has said that his understanding of his maternal grandparents’ history and religion came from family stories.
Mr. Santos, 34 years old, won a New York seat that had previously been held by a Democrat and is set to be sworn into Congress on Jan. 3. The district attorney of Nassau County, N.Y., said Wednesday her office is investigating Mr. Santos. Mr. Santos has said he was born in Queens, N.Y., to Brazilian parents and has dual U.S.-Brazilian citizenship. He said his father’s parents were Brazilian and his mother’s family was Jewish and had fled persecution in Europe. Mr. Santos has said that his understanding of his maternal grandparents’ history and religion came from family stories.
SÃO PAULO—World leaders and some of the biggest names in soccer paid tribute to Pelé , who rose from poverty to become a global ambassador for what he called “the beautiful game.” The 82-year-old died Thursday after a long battle with cancer. Here in his homeland of Brazil, tearful fans were glued to their TVs, reliving the best goals of the man who is lovingly known here as “the King.” Others took to the streets in the coastal city of Santos, where Pelé played for much of his career and where he will be buried.
Brazil’s President-elect Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva has vowed to boost spending on social welfare spending when he takes office in the new year. SÃO PAULO—Brazil’s Congress suspended the government’s spending cap to allow incoming President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva to raise expenditures on social welfare and public works, prompting concerns in financial markets about the fiscal health and long-term growth of Latin America’s biggest economy. The constitutional amendment, backed by 65% of members of Congress in a final vote Wednesday, allows Mr. da Silva, who takes office on Jan. 1, to spend an extra $28 billion in 2023 outside of the country’s spending cap, sidestepping a fiscal anchor designed to keep free-spending governments in check.
SÃO PAULO—Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro on Tuesday vowed to respect the constitution after he lost the presidential election to Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva , ending a tense silence of 45 hours in which he had refused to acknowledge the results even as his allies urged him to do so. Mr. Bolsonaro didn’t comment on his loss in Sunday’s runoff vote in a press conference in Brasília, the capital. His chief of staff, Ciro Nogueira, flanking Mr. Bolsonaro in the briefing, told reporters that the president had authorized him to begin the transition process that would end with Mr. da Silva’s inauguration on Jan. 1.
SÃO PAULO—Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva evoked fond memories of his heady two terms in office in the 2000s when commodity prices were soaring, poverty was plunging and Brazil was optimistically seen as a country of the future. “The people will eat steak and drink beer again…they will be happy again,” Mr. da Silva told supporters in the campaign that ended with Sunday’s victory over President Jair Bolsonaro , who has yet to concede or comment on the results.
SÃO PAULO—Voters who swept Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva back into the presidency Sunday fondly recall his last heady two terms in office in the 2000s when commodity prices were soaring, poverty was plunging and Brazil was finally seen as the country of the future. “The people will eat steak and drink beer again…they will be happy again,” Mr. da Silva told supporters in the campaign that ended with Sunday’s victory over President Jair Bolsonaro , who has yet to concede or comment on the results.
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