Top related persons:
Top related locs:
Top related orgs:

Search resuls for: "Joe Biden's"


25 mentions found


The White House is expected on Thursday to announce the appointment of Erika Moritsugu as the administration's Asian American and Pacific Islander liaison, according to a source familiar with the decision. Moritsugu was previously a vice president at the National Partnership for Women & Families and headed up the group’s Economic Justice team. Erika Moritsugu, Vice President for Congressional Relations/Economic Justice at the National Partnership for Women and Families. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., and Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, criticized the administration over a lack of Asian American and Pacific Islander representation. On Thursday, President Joe Biden is expected to meet with the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus at the White House.
Persons: Erika Moritsugu, Moritsugu, Obama, Tammy Duckworth, Mazie Hirono, Joe Biden's, Duckworth, Joe Biden, Jen Psaki, ” Psaki Organizations: Pacific Islander, National Partnership for Women &, Economic, Department of Housing, Urban Development, Congressional Relations, National Partnership for Women, for Women, Sens, American, CBS, Capitol, Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, White Locations: Hawaii
FILE PHOTO: Brenda Mallory, U.S. President-elect Joe Biden's nominee for Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality, speaks after Biden announced her nomination among another round of nominees and appointees for his administration in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., December 19, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin LamarqueWASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Senate voted 53-45 to confirm Brenda Mallory as head of the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), a key role that is central to federal environmental reviews of major infrastructure projects and coordinating the administration’s environmental justice and climate change policies. The CEQ coordinates White House energy and environmental policies across federal agencies, and can have broad influence on the outlook for big infrastructure projects from pipelines to industrial facilities. She began her career in private practice as a lawyer dealing with the application of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), a bedrock environmental law administered by CEQ. In an interview with Reuters ahead of her nomination last December, Mallory said she hoped the council would reverse changes made by the Trump administration, which sought to ease and speed up NEPA approval of big energy infrastructure projects.
Persons: Brenda Mallory, Joe Biden's, Biden, Kevin Lamarque WASHINGTON, Mallory, , ” Mallory, Trump Organizations: Environmental, REUTERS, U.S, Senate, White, Council, Environmental Protection Agency, Southern Environmental Law, CEQ, Reuters, Trump Locations: U.S, Wilmington , Delaware, American
Bernie Madoff’s legacy as one of Wall Street’s most notorious Ponzi schemers will outlive him — and the lessons regulators learned have implications for policymakers today. “The Bernie Madoff scandal was one of the biggest black eyes the SEC ever received,” said James Cox, a law professor at Duke University. “The incident brought about a huge culture change at the SEC in terms of its inspection processes,” he said. Roper said the scandal was a cautionary tale for both regulators and investors not to suspend their skepticism. We didn't need any new rules in order to prevent Bernie Madoff from happening.
Persons: Bernie Madoff’s, , Bernie Madoff, , James Cox, , rulemaking, Madoff, John Coffee, Barbara Roper, Roper, Richard Painter, ingratiating, ” Painter, Charles Elson, Painter, Trump, Donald Trump, ” Roper, Joe Biden's, Gary Gensler, Biden, Gensler Organizations: Securities and Exchange Commission, SEC, Duke University, Columbia University’s Law, Consumer Federation of America, University of Minnesota, White House, Weinberg, Corporate, University of Delaware, , Commodities Futures, Commission Locations: America
WASHINGTON — Just as President Joe Biden's pandemic response was hitting its stride, a major stumbling block appeared. Gretchen Whitmer, a Biden ally in the throes of one of the country’s worst outbreaks, is publicly questioning the administration's vaccination strategy. In a move that could ultimately delay some of his vaccine goals, on Tuesday the Biden administration recommended a pause in the Johnson & Johnson vaccine to investigate a handful of extremely rare but serious incidents of blood clots. That seems to be like an untenable position.”“I would hope that Whitmer holds their feet to the fire,” Timer added. The administration decided to pause the one-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine, a move that could stoke fears about the vaccine, experts warn.
Persons: WASHINGTON —, Joe Biden's, Gretchen Whitmer, Biden, Donald Trump, Johnson, Whitmer, , , Jeff Timmer, ” “, they've, they're, ” Whitmer, I'm, Rochelle Walensky, Trump, Jen Paski, “ We’re, Eric Topol, Bernie Porn, Porn, hasn’t, Steve Hall, ” Biden Organizations: Michigan Gov, Johnson, Biden White, Michigan Republican Party, GOP, Trump, CBS, for Disease Control, House Press, Scripps Research, Capitol, FBI, EPIC, stoke, Central Michigan Health Department, Pfizer, Moderna, Congressional Black Caucus Locations: Michigan, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, that's, MICHIGAN, Lansing
WASHINGTON — The Capitol Police ignored critical intelligence ahead of the Jan. 6th riot, including overlooking a warning that, “Congress itself is the target,” according to an internal watchdog report obtained by NBC News. The report also makes several recommendations about how the Capitol Police can be better prepared in the future. NBC News reviewed the report on Wednesday ahead of a public hearing on Thursday before a House Administration subcommittee to discuss its findings. In addition, the report found that an FBI field office in Norfolk, Va., also warned the Capitol Police. The watchdog report also found that Capitol Police leaders told officers to avoid using the most aggressive possible responses at the time.
Persons: WASHINGTON, Jan, Donald Trump, Joe Biden's, Trump, , , , Michael Bolton, ” Bolton Organizations: The Capitol Police, , NBC News, U.S . Capitol, Capitol, Capitol Police, NBC, The New York Times, Trump, Department of Homeland Security, FBI, Civil, CDU Locations: Norfolk, Va
FILE PHOTO: Kristen Clarke, U.S. President Joe Biden's nominee to be assistant attorney general for the civil rights division, speaks as Biden announces his Justice Department nominees at his transition headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., January 7, 2021. REUTERS/Kevin LamarqueWASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Joe Biden’s nominees to lead the Justice Department’s civil rights and environmental units are due to face questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday on how they would address racial inequities in policing and climate change. Kristen Clarke, a former Justice Department civil rights attorney who recently led the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, is Biden’s nominee to serve as assistant attorney general for the Civil Rights Division. Todd Kim - a former department attorney, former solicitor general for the District of Columbia and onetime contestant on a spinoff of the TV game show “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?” - is the administration’s pick for assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division. The Biden administration has also vowed to tackle environmental racial justice amid concerns that air and water pollution more often tend to hurt minority communities.
Persons: Kristen Clarke, Joe Biden's, Biden, Kevin Lamarque WASHINGTON, Joe Biden’s, Todd Kim, ” Clarke, Kim, Organizations: REUTERS, Justice Department, Lawyers ’, Civil, Civil Rights Division, District of Columbia, Environment, Natural Resources, Senate, Asian, Republican Locations: U.S, Wilmington , Delaware
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Joe Biden’s nominees to lead the Justice Department’s civil rights and environmental units are facing questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday on how they would address racial inequities in policing and climate change. FILE PHOTO: Kristen Clarke, U.S. President Joe Biden's nominee to be assistant attorney general for the civil rights division, speaks as Biden announces his Justice Department nominees at his transition headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., January 7, 2021. REUTERS/Kevin LamarqueKristen Clarke, a former Justice Department civil rights attorney who recently led the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, is Biden’s nominee to serve as assistant attorney general for the Civil Rights Division. Todd Kim - a former department attorney, former solicitor general for the District of Columbia and onetime contestant on a spinoff of the TV game show “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?” - is the administration’s pick for assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division. In a statement to Reuters this week, Justice Department spokeswoman said Clarke “is opposed to defunding the police.”
Persons: Joe Biden’s, Kristen Clarke, Joe Biden's, Biden, Kevin Lamarque Kristen Clarke, Todd Kim, ” Clarke, Kim, , Dick Durbin, Clarke, “ Ms, Republican Charles Grassley, Clarke “ Organizations: WASHINGTON, REUTERS, Justice Department, Lawyers ’, Civil, Civil Rights Division, District of Columbia, Environment, Natural Resources, Senate, Asian, Republican, Justice Locations: U.S, Wilmington , Delaware
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Kristen Clarke, President Joe Biden’s nominee to lead the Justice Department’s civil rights division, told lawmakers on Wednesday she does not support defunding the police, and she pledged to work closely with law enforcement to find common ground. FILE PHOTO: Kristen Clarke, U.S. President Joe Biden's nominee to be assistant attorney general for the civil rights division, speaks as Biden announces his Justice Department nominees at his transition headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., January 7, 2021. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque“I do not support defunding the police,” she said in testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee for her confirmation hearing. “I can assure this committee that if confirmed, I will bring along experience that I have of working to find common ground with law enforcement to this role,” she said. Clarke, a former Justice Department civil rights attorney who recently led the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, appeared for her confirmation hearing along with Todd Kim, the administration’s pick for assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division.
Persons: Kristen Clarke, Joe Biden’s, Joe Biden's, Biden, Kevin Lamarque “, , Clarke, Todd Kim, Kim, Dick Durbin, “ Ms, Republican Charles Grassley Organizations: WASHINGTON, REUTERS, Committee, Justice Department, Lawyers ’, Civil, Environment, Natural Resources, District of Columbia, Senate, Asian, Republican Locations: U.S, Wilmington , Delaware
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Kristen Clarke, President Joe Biden’s nominee to lead the Justice Department’s civil rights division, fended off attacks from Republicans during her confirmation hearing on Wednesday, saying she does not support defunding the police while promising to find common ground with law enforcement. FILE PHOTO: Kristen Clarke, U.S. President Joe Biden's nominee to be assistant attorney general for the civil rights division, speaks as Biden announces his Justice Department nominees at his transition headquarters in Wilmington, Delaware, U.S., January 7, 2021. The Biden administration has also vowed to tackle environmental racial justice amid concerns that air and water pollution more often tend to hurt minority communities. “People are trying to say you’re wrong for this job when, dear God, you are what we need in the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department,” Democratic Senator Cory Booker said. “If you’re wrong for this job, then Thurgood Marshall was wrong,” Booker continued, referring to the late civil rights attorney and Supreme Court justice.
Persons: Kristen Clarke, Joe Biden’s, Joe Biden's, Biden, Kevin Lamarque, Clarke, , , ” Clarke, Todd Kim, Kim, Ted Cruz, Cory Booker, Thurgood Marshall, ” Booker, Marshall “, Dick Durbin, “ Ms Organizations: WASHINGTON, REUTERS, Harvard University, Police, Justice Department, Lawyers ’, Civil, Environment, Natural Resources, District of Columbia, Senate, Asian, Republican, Wednesday, Pacific Islanders, Republicans, Division, Democratic, Harvard Locations: U.S, Wilmington , Delaware
Beijing confirms Chinese climate envoy to hold talks with Kerry on COP 26
  + stars: | 2021-04-14 | by ( ) www.nbcnews.com + 0.89   time to read: +2 min
BEIJING — China's special climate envoy, Xie Zhenhua, will meet with his U.S. counterpart John Kerry in Shanghai this week and exchange views on a key United Nations climate conference, the foreign ministry said on Wednesday. High-level talks in Alaska last month, the first since U.S. President Joe Biden took office, yielded no breakthrough and led to fiery interactions. Kerry, who Biden selected to represent the U.S. in international climate talks, will seek to find common ground on climate change with Xie, whom he has been acquainted with for years. COP 26, as the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference is also known, will be held in Glasgow, Scotland, in November. Download the NBC News app for breaking news and politicsBiden's Earth Day summit, scheduled for April 22-23, will be a chance for the White House to reassert U.S. leadership on climate change.
Persons: Xie Zhenhua, John Kerry, Biden, Trump, Joe Biden, Kerry, Xie, Zhao Lijian, Zhao, Joe Biden's, Jen Psaki, Donald Trump Organizations: BEIJING, U.S, State Department, Kerry, NBC, White, Democrat, Republican Locations: Shanghai, Nations, China, U.S, Alaska, Glasgow, Scotland, Seoul, South Korea, United States, Paris
Yuan edges up as markets take U.S. inflation data in stride
  + stars: | 2021-04-14 | by ( Reuters Staff | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +4 min
In the spot market, the yuan opened at 6.5415 per dollar and was changing hands at 6.5403 at midday, 49 pips firmer than the previous late session close. The offshore yuan was trading at 6.5425 per dollar. Negative number indicates that spot yuan is trading stronger than the midpoint. The People's Bank of China (PBOC) allows the exchange rate to rise or fall 2% from official midpoint rate it sets each morning. OFFSHORE CNH MARKET Instrument Current Difference from onshore Offshore spot yuan 6.5425 -0.03% * Offshore 6.7235 -2.79% non-deliverable forwards ** *Premium for offshore spot over onshore **Figure reflects difference from PBOC's official midpoint, since non-deliverable forwards are settled against the midpoint.
Persons: Bruce Yam, Hung Kai, Wang Yiming, Li Keqiang, Chris Dodd, State Richard Armitage, James Steinberg, Joe Biden's, Luoyan Liu, Andrew Galbraith, Kim Coghill Organizations: People's Bank of, Federal Reserve, U.S, Century Business Herald, Former U.S, State, White, Thomson Reuters, HKEX, Thomson, People's Bank of China Locations: SHANGHAI, People's Bank of China, U.S, China, Beijing, United States, Taiwan
Biden sends unofficial delegation to Taiwan in signal of U.S. commitment
  + stars: | 2021-04-14 | by ( ) www.cnbc.com + 0.00   time to read: +2 min
Flags of Taiwan and U.S. are placed for a meeting between U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Ed Royce speaks and with Su Chia-chyuan, President of the Legislative Yuan in Taipei, Taiwan March 27, 2018. A senior Biden administration official told Reuters the dispatch of the "unofficial" delegation comes as the United States and Taiwan mark the 42nd anniversary of the Taiwan Relations Act, for which Biden voted when he was a U.S. senator. The delegation will meet with senior Taiwanese officials and followed "a long-standing bipartisan tradition of U.S. administrations sending high-level, unofficial delegations to Taiwan," the official said. The official called it "a personal signal" from the president, who took office in January. "The selection of these three individuals — senior statesmen who are longtime friends of Taiwan and personally close with President Biden — sends an important signal about the U.S. commitment to Taiwan and its democracy."
Persons: Ed Royce, Su Chia, Chris Dodd, State Richard Armitage, James Steinberg, Joe Biden's, Biden, Biden —, Tsai Ing, Donald Trump, Mike Pompeo, Trump Organizations: . House Foreign, Former U.S, State, White, Biden, Reuters, Taiwan Relations, Taiwan's, Ministry, The State Department, Washington, U.S Locations: Taiwan, U.S, Taipei, United States, Taipei's, Songshan, China, Beijing
China condemns U.S. officials' visit to Taiwan
  + stars: | 2021-04-14 | by ( Reuters Editorial | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.99   time to read: 1 min
WorldChina condemns U.S. officials' visit to TaiwanPostedChina described its military exercises near Taiwan as "combat drills" on Wednesday, hours before the arrival of senior former U.S. officials in Taipei on a trip to signal President Joe Biden's commitment to Taiwan and its democracy. Gloria Tso reports.
Persons: Joe Biden's, Gloria Tso Organizations: U.S Locations: China, U.S, Taiwan, Taipei
Nancy Pelosi told USA Today she would have fought the Capitol rioters if they found her on January 6. Rioters stormed the building, forcing lawmakers to be evacuated. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she would have fought the Capitol rioters if they found her as they stormed the building. She told USA Today that her security agents had managed to evacuate her. She also lifted her foot in a high-heeled shoe, joking that "I would have had these" to use as weapons, USA Today reported.
Persons: Nancy Pelosi, Pelosi, Trump, Joe Biden's, Mike Pence, rioter, Richard Barnett Organizations: USA, Capitol, Prosecutors, USA Today, Capitol Police
Why Wall Street is so excited about bank stocks
  + stars: | 2021-04-14 | by ( Julia Horowitz | Cnn Business | ) edition.cnn.com + 0.00   time to read: +6 min
You can sign up right hereLondon (CNN Business) For years, Wall Street turned up its nose at America's bank stocks. "Financials are still extremely cheap relative to the market," Jonathan Golub, chief US equity strategist at Credit Suisse, told me. A big test of the bank stock rally will come this week. Then there's the flood of deals that have forced Wall Street bankers into overdrive. At least for now, Wall Street is opting to look past the data.
Persons: Wall, Thehas, Jonathan Golub, they've, JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs, Wells, Golub, wouldn't, financials, Daniel Ives, it's, Ethereum, Dogecoin, Shiba, , Joe Biden's, Anneken Tappe, Jeffrey Halley, Oanda, BBBY Goldman Sachs, Jerome Powell Organizations: CNN Business, Bell, CNN, Wall Street, Credit Suisse, JPMorgan, Nasdaq, Wedbush Securities, Intercontinental Exchange, New York Stock Exchange, US, JPMorgan Chase JPM Wells, Economic, of Washington Locations: London, America
The AI startup raised $18M to further its defense work and expand into healthcare and manufacturing. With millions in Air Force deals, Virtualitics is betting on AI growth as the US competes with China. The five-year-old startup just raised an $18 million Series B-1 round led by North Sound Ventures. This round brings the Pasadena, California-based startup's Series B round to $25 million, with $29.4 million raised overall. And so we kind of really pursued it and, and that led to more and more contracts," Amori told Insider.
Persons: Virtualitics, Brian Miller, Michael Amori, Amori, what's, Lockheed Martin, Palmer, Peter Thiel —, Alex Wong, Joe Biden's, Trump, Michael Groen, Maven, It's Organizations: Air Force, California Institute of Technology, NASA Jet Propulsion, Department of Defense, North Sound Ventures, North Sound Partners, Service, Salesforce, Google, Microsoft, Defense Department, Northrop Grumman, Lockheed, Pentagon, Anduril Industries, Artificial Intelligence, Getty, Big Tech, DOD Locations: China, Connecticut, Pasadena , California, Silicon Valley
The Senate GOP will meet next week to decide on bringing earmarks, funding members can use for their districts, back. Some GOP Senators opposed bringing earmarks back because of past abuses with the funding measure. Almost a month after House Republicans voted to approve the restoration of earmarks, Senate Republicans are expected to meet next week to discuss bringing back the so-called community funding measures. But now, both House Democrats and House Republicans have voted to bring them back, and Senate Republicans are set to meet next Wednesday to ratify their rules and discuss earmark usage, according to Bloomberg. On March 17, House Republicans voted by secret ballot to bring earmarks back as well.
Persons: Sen, Joe Manchin, Republican Sen, Richard Shelby of, Kevin McCarthy, Biden, McCarthy, Mitt Romney, Barack Obama, Don Young, Duke Cunningham, Marco Rubio, Steve Daines, Rubio, Joe Biden's Organizations: GOP, Republicans, Democrats, House Republicans, Bloomberg, Republican, Alaska Rep, California Rep, Sens, Transportation, Infrastructure Locations: West Virginia, Richard Shelby of Alabama, Utah, California, Marco Rubio of Florida, Montana
GOP leadership insists less than 6% of Biden's plan goes to roads and bridges, ignoring EV investments. Amid arguments over the definition of infrastructure, Republicans are making false statements about President Joe Biden's $2 trillion infrastructure bill and labeling the Democratic effort as "socialist." "They're talking about an infrastructure bill. "Over 90% of the bill they're proposing has nothing to do with roads and bridges," he continued. "People would expect, if you're gonna have a $2 trillion bill, that it would be all about roads and bridges.
Persons: Steve Scalise, Joe Biden's, It's, Donald Trump's, Biden, Steve Scalise of, Pelosi, Scalise, Mitch McConnell, Kevin McCarthy, McCarthy —, , Kristi Noem, Republican Sen, Shelly Moore Capito, McCarthy, Noem Organizations: GOP, Wednesday, Tea Party, Republicans, American Jobs Plan, Green New Deal, Politico, Wednesday's, South Dakota Gov, Fox News, Republican Locations: Steve Scalise of Louisiana, Soviet Union, USSR, South, West Virginia, Scalise
Republicans say Biden's planned troop withdrawal from Afghanistan would make it a safe haven for terrorists. But US intelligence and law enforcement now view domestic extremism as the greatest terror threat. But experts have long dismissed this as a myth, largely because the evidence points to domestic extremism being the greatest terror threat to the US. And in recent years, law enforcement has increasingly cited far-right groups — especially white supremacists — as the greatest extremism threat to the US. But Burns also said that Al Qaeda and ISIS currently lack the ability to attack the homeland and aren't the most dangerous transnational terror groups anymore.
Persons: Biden's, Joe Biden's, Mitch McConnell, Liz Cheney, Cheney, Osama bin Laden, bin Laden, Lev Radin, Donald Trump, Christopher Wray, Wray, Biden, they'll, Joe Biden, SHAH MARAI, Al, Al Qaeda, William Burns, there's, Burns Organizations: Republicans, GOP, Republican, Navy, Department of Homeland Security, Capitol, Pacific Press, Getty, FBI, Center for Strategic, International Studies, The Washington, US, Getty Images, The New York Times, ISIS, Al, CIA, Senate Intelligence Locations: Afghanistan, United States, Wyoming, Washington ,, Pakistan, Saudi, New America, Bagram, Kabul, AFP, Al Qaeda, Afghan Government
Former President Barack Obama praised Biden for planning to end the US war in Afghanistan. Biden announced that he plans to withdraw all troops in Afghanistan by September 11, 2021. "It is time to recognize that we have accomplished all that we can militarily," Obama said. Former President Barack Obama on Wednesday praised President Joe Biden's "bold leadership" in taking steps to end the US war in Afghanistan that has drawn out for nearly two decades and spanned multiple administrations. On Wednesday, NATO announced that they too plan to withdraw their allied forces from Afghanistan alongside the US.
Persons: Barack Obama, Biden, Obama, Joe Biden's, Osama Bin Laden, bin, Obama's Organizations: Wednesday, Pentagon, America, Afghan Security Forces, World Trade Center, Atlantic Treaty Organization, NATO Locations: Afghanistan, White, Pasadena, U.S, harm's
GOP Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming told Fox News that she would not support Donald Trump if he was the GOP's 2024 nominee. GOP Rep. Liz Cheney, of Wyoming, told Fox News on Wednesday that she would not support former President Donald Trump if he were nominated as the Republican Party's 2024 candidate. "If Donald Trump were the 2024 nominee, would you support him?" Nikki Haley and Senate Minority leader Mitch McConnell, who have criticized Trump for instigating the insurrection on January 6, have said they would support Trump should he win the GOP nomination. Earlier this week, Cheney accused Trump of "embracing insurrection," and in January, Cheney voted to impeach Trump.
Persons: Liz Cheney, Donald Trump, Neil Cavuto, Cheney, Joe Biden's, Cavuto, Donald Trump's, Nikki Haley, Mitch McConnell, Trump Organizations: Wyoming, Fox News, GOP, Republican, Trump, Trump loyalists Locations: Wyoming, Afghanistan
South Africa is putting J&J's vaccine on pause, effectively halting that country's vaccine drive entirely, since no other COVID-19 vaccines are available there. There is a lot that isn't known about these blood clots and what, if any, role J&J's vaccine plays. Both AstraZeneca and Johnson & Johnson use a viral-vector-vaccine technology, which is based on a harmless virus. Army medics fill syringes with Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination site in Orlando, Florida, on April 10. Massachusetts had planned to allocate its Johnson & Johnson vaccine supply to homebound patients.
Persons: Johnson, Johnson's, who'd, Beth Bell, J's, Aran Maree, Janssen, Dr, Tom Shimabukuro, Joe Biden's, Shah, Rochelle Walensky, what's, Maree, thrombocytopenia, Pfizer's, Biden, Johnson COVID, Paul Hennessy, Jeff Zients, Charlie Baker, Baker Organizations: CDC, Johnson, for Disease Control, University of Washington, Food and Drug Administration, J, Maine's, House, FDA, AstraZeneca, Regulators, Pfizer, Moderna, : Locations: Europe, Australia, Africa, South Africa, : Oregon, Maine , Massachusetts , Vermont, Washington, Orlando , Florida, Massachusetts, . Massachusetts
Senate Republicans joined Democrats in voting to advance an anti-Asian hate crimes bill. The bill addresses a rise in violence against the AAPI community during the COVID-19 pandemic. In a rare bipartisan effort, the Senate on Wednesday pushed forward a bill that addresses the spike in discrimination and violence against Asian Americans amid the coronavirus pandemic. The COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act, led by Democrats Sen. Mazie Hirono of Hawaii and Rep. Grace Meng of New York, would direct the Department of Justice to expedite the review of coronavirus-related hate crimes and improve public reporting on hate crimes during the public health crisis. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he's in favor of the bill, and would like to see some amendments tacked on.
Persons: Wednesday's, Democrats Sen, Mazie, Grace Meng, — Sens, Ted Cruz, Josh Hawley, Tom Cotton of, Roger Marshall of, Rand Paul of Kentucky, Tommy Tuberville, Alabama —, Chuck Schumer, Joe Biden's, Biden, Mitch McConnell, McConnell, Elaine Chao, Schumer, Donald Trump, Hirono Organizations: Republicans, Democrats, Rep, Department of Justice, Top, GOP, American, Pacific Locations: Hawaii, New York, Ted Cruz of Texas, Josh Hawley of Missouri, Tom Cotton of Arkansas, Roger Marshall of Kansas, Alabama, American, Atlanta, COVID, Pacific Islander
Shoppers had better start budgeting more for their grocery bills, according to the latest consumer price index, which shows prices are increasing — and they’re likely to keep going up. The monthly consumer price index, released Tuesday morning by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, showed a 0.6 percent increase in March, the largest one-month increase in nearly a decade. The latest spike in grocery bills comes on the back of prices that had already risen during last year’s pandemic stockpiling and supply chain disruptions and never went down. Outside a Long Island, New York, supermarket, shopper John Kermaj said he’s seen prices rising in just the past two months. So grocery prices are likely to remain on the higher end of estimates for at least the rest of the year, Olvera said.
Persons: John Kermaj, he’s, , ” Kermaj, Lester Holt, Phil Tedesco, Isaac Olvera, , Olvera, Jared Bernstein, Ernie Tedeschi, Joe Biden's, Jayson Lusk, Amy Keating, Keating, ” Keating, Joanne Budhu, We’re, ” Budhu Organizations: Shoppers, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Gas, NBC, Nielsen, , ArrowStream, Producers, Economic Advisers, Purdue University, , Consumer Locations: , New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, Dallas, China, stoke
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Joe Biden’s nominee to lead the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, Kristen Clarke, is poised to take on the role at a fraught time in American history. Former colleagues say Clarke’s experience, both as a Justice Department lawyer and as executive director of a large civil rights organization, make her qualified to tackle the challenge. Clarke has spent a good chunk of her career advocating for voting rights issues. Since 2016, Clarke has led the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. “It was non-stop,” Clarke’s colleague with the Lawyer’s Committee, Jon Greenbaum, said of the group’s voting rights work in 2020.
Persons: Joe Biden’s, Kristen Clarke, Joe Biden's, Biden, Kevin Lamarque Clarke, Derek Chauvin, George Floyd, Clarke, Todd Kim, Kim, you’d, Kristen, , Justin Levitt, Ernest Montgomery, Montgomery, Holder, , ” Montgomery, Donald Trump, Jon Greenbaum, ” Clarke, Black, General Merrick Garland, Garland Organizations: WASHINGTON, Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, REUTERS, Republican, Natural Resources, Justice Department, U.S . Department of Energy, Loyola Law School, NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Lawyers ’, Civil, Lawyer’s, Harvard University Locations: U.S, Wilmington , Delaware, Minneapolis, Calera , Alabama, Shelby County
Total: 25