Top related persons:
Top related locs:
Top related orgs:

Search resuls for: "James R. Hagerty"


25 mentions found


Lloyd N. Morrisett set out to see if television could be both educational and entertaining for children. Lloyd N. Morrisett , a Yale-educated experimental psychologist, was surprised in late 1965 to discover that his 3-year-old daughter would turn on the television set at 6:30 a.m. and watch the test signal for half an hour while awaiting the day’s first cartoon. At a New York dinner party hosted by Joan Ganz Cooney a few months later, Dr. Morrisett mentioned his daughter’s TV fixation and wondered out loud whether there was a way to use television’s addictive powers to educate children while entertaining them.
As a singer and songwriter in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Ginny Redington struggled to win attention in an extremely crowded field. When she began writing advertising jingles in the mid-1970s, she rapidly became a star in that smaller arena by writing a peppy tune for McDonald’s Corp.’s “You, You’re the One” campaign. Her greatest hits also included ditties for dozens of other products, including Colgate toothpaste and Holiday Inn .
Lloyd N. Morrisett set out to see if television could be both educational and entertaining for children. Lloyd N. Morrisett , a Yale-educated experimental psychologist, was surprised in late 1965 to discover that his 3-year-old daughter would turn on the television set at 6:30 a.m. and watch the test signal for half an hour while awaiting the day’s first cartoon. At a New York dinner party hosted by Joan Ganz Cooney a few months later, Dr. Morrisett mentioned his daughter’s TV fixation and wondered out loud whether there was a way to use television’s addictive powers to educate children while entertaining them.
Edward R. Pressman, talking about the headstrong directors he worked with, said, ‘I sense their vision will produce something very special.’In a film, he might have been cast as a balding philosophy professor whose students strained to hear the quiet elegance of his carefully chosen words. In real life, Edward R. Pressman was an independent movie producer with a devotion to art films and an ability to find financing and distribution for productions others would see as too risky. The more than 90 movies he produced during a five-decade career included “Wall Street,” “Badlands” and “American Psycho.” Among the directors he nurtured were Oliver Stone, Brian De Palma and Terrence Malick.
Carl Hahn used his morning commute to test drive VW cars rather than relying on a chauffeur. Carl Hahn helped sell Americans on the Volkswagen Beetle in the 1960s and later, as head of the German auto maker, expanded boldly into manufacturing in China, Spain and Eastern Europe. After earning a doctorate in economics in Switzerland, the German-born Mr. Hahn worked in Italy and France. He joined VW in 1954 as an assistant to the chief executive officer, Heinrich Nordhoff. He was sent to head VW’s U.S. unit in 1959 and used clever marketing to expand sales of the Beetle, soon embraced by the peace-and-love generation.
If Tom Karen had been born in a less turbulent era, he might have ended up running his family’s brick and cement works in Brno, now part of the Czech Republic. His father’s family was Jewish. His parents managed to flee with their three children and escape the Holocaust, which would kill his paternal grandfather. Young Tom lived as a refugee in Brussels and Nice, France, before settling in London and studying aeronautical engineering, an odd fit for a young man who preferred doodling and dreaming to math. He drifted in a depressed and lonely state until he began studying industrial design and found his calling.
Joseph A. Hardy III once purchased a British royal title, lord of the manor of Henley-in-Arden, and began holding mock royal receptions at his resort. Joseph A. Hardy III , the founder of 84 Lumber Co., tried to keep the business simple by selling building supplies to contractors and remodelers in no-frills outlets scattered across the U.S.His personal life was more complicated.
Per Pedersen Aimed to Change the Face of Advertising
  + stars: | 2023-01-12 | by ( James R. Hagerty | ) www.wsj.com   time to read: 1 min
Per Pedersen spent most of his career at Grey, an advertising unit of WPP, before launching his by The Network ad cooperative. Per Pedersen ‘s death on Jan. 4, of cancer at age 58, cut short his leadership of an experiment aimed at changing the face of advertising. Mr. Pedersen, a Dane who spent most of his career at Grey, an advertising unit of the global WPP PLC, believed that giant companies were stifling creativity and failing to attract or retain free spirits with fresh ideas. In 2020, he founded a cooperative—known as by The Network—to help small independently owned agencies around the world collaborate. It serves 34 agencies, employing a total of about 750 people, in more than 30 countries.
Twitter Sued Over Rent Payment in San Francisco
  + stars: | 2023-01-02 | by ( James R. Hagerty | ) www.wsj.com   time to read: 1 min
The suit against Twitter alleges breach of contract and was filed in California Superior Court in San Francisco. Twitter Inc. was accused of not paying its rent in a lawsuit filed by the landlord for one of its offices in San Francisco. The landlord, Columbia Reit-650 California LLC, alleges that the social-media company has failed to pay $136,260 of rent due on the office space at 650 California St., according to the lawsuit filed Thursday.
Bruce Batkin co-founded Terra Capital Partners in 2002 to package real-estate funds for investors, initially in Australia and later in the U.S.As a boy riding his bicycle on Long Island, Bruce Batkin often stopped at fancy homes and rang doorbells to request house tours, invariably granted to a cherubic child in the 1960s. Back inside his parents’ three-bedroom, one-bath ranch, he drew lavish floor plans. Later, at Cornell University, he earned a degree in architecture. He worked in real-estate finance for Merrill Lynch, ABN Amro Bank and Chase Manhattan Bank. In 2002, he co-founded Terra Capital Partners to package real-estate funds for investors, initially in Australia and later in the U.S.
During his second stint as CEO of Corning, James Houghton put a renewed focus on quality and hired a psychologist to coach senior managers on teamwork. Jamie Houghton liked to joke that he “failed retirement.”When he stepped down as chief executive of Corning Inc. in 1996 after 13 years of running the company founded by his great-great grandfather, Mr. Houghton said Corning’s outlook was bright. “We’re concentrating on communications, environment and life sciences, all of which are dynamite areas to be in,” he said.
Southwest Airlines Co. showed more progress Saturday in its push to regain credibility with regulators and travelers, especially those whose holidays were disrupted by the company’s meltdown over the past week. The Dallas-based carrier had just one Saturday flight cancellation as of midday, according to FlightAware. Overall, more than 70 flights among all airlines flying to, from or within the U.S. had been canceled.
At shareholder meetings, she was the stinging nun. For more than four decades, Sister Patricia Daly pursued her chosen vocation: shareholder activist and scourge of corporate CEOs. A member of the Roman Catholic Sisters of St. Dominic congregation of Caldwell, N.J., she worked with religious shareholder groups to prod companies to take action on issues including environmental protection and human trafficking. She matched wits with General Electric Co. then-Chief Executive Jack Welch at a shareholder meeting in 1998, when she urged GE to issue warnings about the risks of eating fish contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, from its plants.
SAN ANTONIO, Texas––At the U.S. military’s working dog hospital here, being treated like a dog isn’t so bad. Dogs fly in from all over the world for treatment at the hospital’s rehabilitation center. Some are so eager to start daily exercises that they body slam the clinic’s doors. Rewards for good behavior include squeeze toys and frozen chicken chunks.
The Way You Tell Your Life Story Matters. Start Now.
  + stars: | 2022-12-26 | by ( James R. Hagerty | ) www.wsj.com   time to read: 1 min
In the 2003 movie ‘Big Fish,’ a son tries to sort out truth from fiction of his father’s life. “Death steals everything except our stories,” wrote the poet Jim Harrison. If we aren’t careful, death can steal those, too. When it comes to money and real estate, most of us make careful arrangements for what will happen after we die. Why not take equal care of our stories, which can’t be retrieved once lost?
Arnold Fulton , a native of Poland who narrowly escaped the Holocaust and settled in Britain after World War II, became one of the most prominent and innovative makers of umbrellas in his adopted homeland. In a notoriously rainy country, demand was reliable. With a background in mechanical engineering, Mr. Fulton designed his own manufacturing equipment and frequently came up with innovations, including an umbrella built for two and the see-through Birdcage umbrella, whose loyal customers included members of the royal family. Millions of umbrellas made by his A. Fulton Co. blossomed every time it poured in Britain and Canada, the company’s two biggest markets.
Scott Minerd , an outspoken and influential fund manager who was chief investment officer of Guggenheim Partners, died Wednesday of a heart attack. Mr. Minerd, 63 years old and a committed weightlifter known to bench press more than 400 pounds, died during his daily workout, the firm said.
After a career as a clarinetist for the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra and other ensembles around the world, Edward Avedisian became famous in September for something else: donating $100 million to Boston University’s medical school. Many people wondered how a man with no trust fund and only a middle-class income could afford such a large gift, plus others totaling at least $25 million more.
Jay Howard Leve discovered that people were much less likely to hang up on telephone pollsters if they heard a familiar, trusted voice. Jay H. Leve pioneered a novel type of polling technology in the early 1990s by combining automated phone calls with the recorded voices of local television anchors. Mr. Leve, the founder of SurveyUSA, discovered that people were much less likely to hang up if they heard a familiar, trusted voice and were promised they could hear the poll results that night on the TV news. The recorded voice would urge respondents to “press one” to start the polling process, leading to an automated collection of responses to questions.
Frank Mori , whose previous experience included selling bras, Jell-O and Dixie cups, arrived as chief executive of Anne Klein & Co. in 1975 with a mission some industry people saw as impossible: Keeping a fashion house relevant after the death of its namesake designer. Ms. Klein had died in 1974. Takihyo, a Japanese firm that owned a large stake in her company, recruited Mr. Mori to try to save its investment. “A fashion house usually dies when the founder dies,” Mr. Mori said later. But the business was still functioning.”
Jim Stewart , a bank employee who moonlighted as a fiddle player in a country band, realized in the late 1950s that he was never going to hit the big time as a musician. The next best thing, he figured, was to become a record producer. With makeshift equipment and no training as an audio engineer, he launched his own Satellite label. The first two discs, a cloying country ballad and a rockabilly number, went nowhere. His sister Estelle Axton mortgaged her home to provide more capital, and they founded what became Stax Records, housed in a former movie theater in Memphis.
Margaret Duckhorn Helped Make California Merlot a Hit
  + stars: | 2022-12-04 | by ( James R. Hagerty | ) www.wsj.com   time to read: 1 min
Margaret Duckhorn was a school nurse before she and her husband, Dan Duckhorn, founded a Napa Valley winery in 1976. His background was in banking and venture capital. At a time when other vintners tended to see Merlot as a supporting-cast grape to be blended into Cabernet Sauvignon, the Duckhorns thought it could star on its own as a varietal wine. Mr. Duckhorn had sampled Merlots in the Pomerol region of Bordeaux, France. He appreciated their softness and velvety character.
John Palmour Changed Recipe for Making Microchips
  + stars: | 2022-12-04 | by ( James R. Hagerty | ) www.wsj.com   time to read: 1 min
As a graduate student in materials science in the early 1980s, John Palmour took a chance on an unproven way to make semiconductors, substituting silicon carbide for the usual pure silicon. Silicon carbide had long been seen as a promising chip material, especially in applications involving lots of power and heat. The rub was that it was hard to avoid defects in the tricky process of growing silicon carbide crystals. Because the material is extremely hard, it also was difficult to slice into the required sizes.
John Y. Brown Jr. Helped Col. Sanders Make KFC a Giant
  + stars: | 2022-11-29 | by ( James R. Hagerty | ) www.wsj.com   time to read: 1 min
While studying law at the University of Kentucky in the late 1950s, John Y. Brown Jr. sold encyclopedias door to door and sometimes earned $500 in a weekend. It was the best training he ever had, he said later. As chief executive and part owner of Kentucky Fried Chicken in the 1960s, Mr. Brown continued to dazzle with his salesmanship as the chain grew from a small operation into an international franchising giant. As governor, he promoted Kentucky as a paradise for business.
After completing his doctoral studies in social relations at Harvard in 1960, Michael Maccoby drove a rusty Ford to Cuernavaca, Mexico, to help the psychoanalyst and philosopher Erich Fromm conduct research on the motivations of people in farming villages. They worked together for eight years and produced a book, “Social Character in a Mexican Village.”It could have been the prelude to an academic career. Instead, Dr. Maccoby pursued his field work in factories and corporate suites, applying what he had learned from psychology, sociology and anthropology to management consulting and books for general readers, including “Strategic Intelligence” and “The Productive Narcissist.” He advised companies and government agencies on leadership and motivation of employees.
Total: 25