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WASHINGTON, Nov 29 (Reuters) - Top U.S. Democrats said on Tuesday that securing more funding for Ukraine and COVID-19 and passing a full-year spending bill are priorities before Republicans take control of the House of Representatives early next year. Later in the day, top Senate Democrats said passing a full-year spending bill, known as an omnibus, was vital for national security. A commonly floated alternative, known as a continuing resolution, or CR, would effectively freeze spending at current levels. Republicans are split on whether to support an omnibus spending bill or a CR, top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell told reporters. On Ukraine, House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy, who attended the talks with Biden, gave a taste of what to expect if he takes over as House speaker as he hopes.
It would not bar states from blocking same-sex or interracial marriages if the Supreme Court allowed them to do so. A similar, but not identical, bill passed the House of Representatives earlier this year with support from 47 Republicans and all Democrats. The House would need to approve the Senate version before it is sent to President Joe Biden to sign into law. In June, the Supreme Court overturned the nationwide right to an abortion, undoing 50 years of precedent. In a concurring opinion, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas wrote the court should consider reversing other decisions protecting individual freedoms, including the 2015 ruling on gay marriage.
Companies Chevron Corp FollowWASHINGTON, Nov 26 (Reuters) - The United States on Saturday issued an expanded license allowing Chevron Corp to import petroleum or petroleum products produced by its ventures in Venezuela, after the Venezuelan government and its opposition said they would resume political talks. "This action reflects longstanding U.S. policy to provide targeted sanctions relief based on concrete steps that alleviate the suffering of the Venezuelan people and support the restoration of democracy," the U.S. Treasury Department statement said in a statement. A Chevron spokesperson said the company was reviewing the license terms. Reporting by Gary McWilliams; Writing by Daphne Psaledakis and Gram Slattery Editing by Marguerita ChoyOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
WASHINGTON, Nov 23 (Reuters) - Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski and Democratic Representative Mary Peltola of Alaska both won reelection against opponents backed by Donald Trump on Wednesday, the latest high-profile defeats of candidates supported by the former president. Murkowski, 65, has represented Alaska in the Senate since 2002 and built an independent profile as one of the chamber's few centrists. Peltola, the first Alaska Native elected to Congress, beat two Republicans: former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin and businessman Nick Begich. Tea Party era of politics and helped pave the way for Trump to win the White House. Murkowski and Peltola would have won even under Alaska's old election rules, as they had each won a plurality of votes.
Democrat Peltola re-elected to U.S. House in Alaska
  + stars: | 2022-11-24 | by ( ) www.reuters.com   time to read: +2 min
WASHINGTON, Nov 23 (Reuters) - U.S. Representative Mary Peltola of Alaska, a Democrat first elected in August, was reelected to a full two-year term on Wednesday, beating two Republicans, former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin and businessman Nick Begich. Peltola came out on top after Alaska finished tabulating all ballots in a publicly broadcast session using its new "ranked choice" system, which allows voters to list candidates in order of preference. Peltola would have won even under the old system, as she had a significant plurality against Palin and Begich from the first count. Tea Party era of politics and helped pave the way for Donald Trump to win the White House. Peltola, the first Alaska Native elected to Congress, was endorsed by the state's longtime U.S. senator, Lisa Murkowski, a moderate Republican, as well as the staff of Republican former U.S. Representative Don Young, Peltola's predecessor.
WASHINGTON, Nov 23 (Reuters) - Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska has won reelection, defeating Kelly Tshibaka, a former Republican state official who was endorsed by former President Donald Trump, a tabulation carried out by state officials showed on Wednesday. Murkowski, 65, has represented Alaska in the Senate since 2002 and has built an independent profile as one of the chamber's few centrists. Murkowski defeated Tshibaka after Alaska finished tabulating all ballots in a publicly broadcast session using its new "ranked choice" system, which allows voters to list candidates in order of preference. The candidate with a majority of votes after all ballots have been counted wins. She won reelection as a write-in candidate in 2010 after her party nominated a more right-wing contender.
[1/2] U.S. House of Representatives Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) arrives as House Republicans gather for leadership elections at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., November 15, 2022. REUTERS/Leah Millis/File PhotoWASHINGTON, Nov 22 (Reuters) - The top Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives, Kevin McCarthy, on Tuesday called on Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas to step down, warning that the House may try to impeach him when Republicans take the majority next year. "Our country may never recover from Secretary Mayorkas' dereliction of duty," McCarthy told reporters in El Paso, Texas, on Tuesday after speaking with border officials. "If Secretary Mayorkas does not resign, House Republicans will investigate every order, every action and every failure (to) determine whether we can begin (an) impeachment inquiry," he said. He became the first Latino and foreign-born Homeland Security chief when he was confirmed to the role in February 2021.
They won a narrow House majority, having won the 218 seats needed, with eight still uncalled. McConnell and Scott both addressed the gathering, which included newly elected Trump-backed Senate Republicans, including J.D. [1/5] U.S. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell walks to his office at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, U.S., November 15, 2022. In the House, conservative Republicans continued to bash party leader Kevin McCarthy, a day after he overcame a challenger for the chamber's top job of House speaker. While Senate Republicans met in the morning to vote for party leaders, House Republicans met later in the day to consider chamber rules for the next Congress.
Despite Republican hopes for a "red wave" of support in the Nov. 8 elections, they failed to reverse Democrats' razor-thin Senate majority. They appear to be on course to win a narrow House majority, having won 217 of the 218 seats they would need, with 10 still uncalled. McConnell and Scott both addressed the gathering, which included newly elected Trump-backed Senate Republicans, including J.D. [1/5] U.S. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell walks to his office at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, U.S., November 15, 2022. While Senate Republicans met in the morning to vote for party leaders, House Republicans were due later in the day to consider chamber rules for the next Congress, assuming they succeed in capturing the House.
WASHINGTON, Nov 16 (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Republicans, who failed to win control of the chamber in last week's midterm elections, on Wednesday voted to keep Mitch McConnell as their caucus leader, a spokesperson said. McConnell fended off a challenge by Senator Rick Scott, who had run the Republicans' election organization. Reporting by Gram Slattery David Morgan; writing by Katharine Jackson; editing by Paul GrantOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
[1/5] U.S. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell walks to his office at the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, U.S., November 15, 2022. Trump, who launched his own 2024 White House candidacy on Tuesday, falsely claims he lost because of fraud. "The Democrats outmaneuver us in every election," Braun said as Republicans met to choose their leaders for the next two years. In the House, conservative Republicans continued to bash party leader Kevin McCarthy, a day after he overcame a challenger for the chamber's top job of House speaker. While Senate Republicans met in the morning to vote for party leaders, House Republicans were due later in the day to consider chamber rules for the next Congress, assuming they succeed in capturing the House.
WASHINGTON, Nov 15 (Reuters) - Senator Rick Scott will challenge current U.S. Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell for leadership of Senate Republicans in an election on Wednesday, he said on Tuesday. McConnell, who has not faced opposition for the job since he became the Republican leader in 2007, is seeking to become the longest-serving party leader in the chamber. Scott also sent colleagues a letter outlining his reasons for the challenge, saying he'd heard complaints about the process and priorities of the Senate and about lack of coordination between House and Senate Republicans. "I believe it's time for the Senate Republican Conference to be far more bold and resolute than we have been in the past. McConnell told reporters that Republicans could delay the internal vote, but he still expected to be re-elected as the Senate Republican leader when it took place.
Trump in turn has blasted back, accusing the media without evidence of favoring DeSantis in a conspiracy to deny him the nomination. There is also an effort underway to get Trump to focus less on past grievances. In a Friday post on his Truth Social network, Trump called Youngkin "Young Kin" and said, "sounds Chinese, doesn’t it?" The day earlier, Trump posted a long harangue about DeSantis that again called him Ron "DeSanctimonious" and said he owes his political fortunes to Trump. Two Florida Republicans close to DeSantis predicted the governor would be wary of responding directly, keeping his focus on the state's recovery from Hurricane Ian and policy issues.
Trump in turn has blasted back, accusing the media without evidence of favoring DeSantis in a conspiracy to deny him the nomination. There is also an effort underway to get Trump to focus less on past grievances. In a Friday post on his Truth Social network, Trump called Youngkin "Young Kin" and said, "sounds Chinese, doesn’t it?" The day earlier, Trump posted a long harangue about DeSantis that again called him Ron "DeSanctimonious" and said he owes his political fortunes to Trump. Two Florida Republicans close to DeSantis predicted the governor would be wary of responding directly, keeping his focus on the state's recovery from Hurricane Ian and policy issues.
Trump would be the favorite in a primary matchup against DeSantis or any other Republican. Although he has been coy about a presidential run, supporters at his victory party chanted "Two more years!" Even if Trump mounts another presidential run, he will continue to face a dizzying array of legal headaches, including probes of his efforts to overturn the 2020 election and his removal of classified documents from the White House. I don't like him," said two-time Trump voter Gordon Nelson, 77, as he voted for Republican candidates in Michigan on Tuesday. At a Wednesday press conference, Biden seemed amused at the prospect of Trump and DeSantis going head-to-head.
Former NFL football star Herschel Walker trailed Democratic Senator Raphael Warnock in Georgia, as the two headed to a Dec. 6 run-off election. But Trump-backed Senate candidates J.D. The populist priorities of his "America First" agenda and his combative political style also helped shape the overall Republican campaign. Save America contributed close to $30 million to political allies and Republican Party accounts, including $20 million in October to a group that ran television ads supporting Republican Senate candidates in Georgia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Arizona and Nevada. But Save America's contributions paled in comparison to spending by the Senate Leadership Fund, or SLF, a leading political action committee aligned with top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell.
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House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy had hoped to celebrate a resounding victory that would propel him into the top job of speaker. But Republican hopes for a "red wave" of victories faded as Democrats showed surprising resilience in several key races. Pelosi said in a statement, "It is clear that House Democratic members and candidates are strongly outperforming expectations around the country." [1/9] Supporters cheer U.S. House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) at a House Republicans' party held late on the night of the 2022 U.S. midterm elections in Washington, U.S., November 9, 2022. The Georgia Senate race could end up in a Dec. 6 runoff, possibly with Senate control at stake.
By early Wednesday, Republicans had flipped six Democratic House seats, Edison Research projected, one more than the minimum they need to take over the chamber. But Republican hopes for a "red wave" of victories faded as Democrats showed surprising resilience in several key races. Pelosi said in a statement, "It is clear that House Democratic members and candidates are strongly outperforming expectations around the country." But television host and heart surgeon Mehmet Oz failed to win his Pennsylvania Senate race. In Pennsylvania, Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano, who sought to overturn the state's election results after Trump lost, was defeated by Democrat Josh Shapiro.
In the House of Representatives, Republicans remained favored to win a majority that would allow them to halt Biden's legislative agenda. By early Wednesday, the party had flipped six Democratic House seats, Edison Research projected, one more than the minimum they need to take over the chamber. But Republican hopes for a "red wave" of victories faded as Democrats showed surprising resilience in several key races. The Democratic speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi, said in a statement, "It is clear that House Democratic members and candidates are strongly outperforming expectations around the country." Voter anger over the Supreme Court's June decision to overturn the nationwide right to abortion helped Democrats to curb their losses.
SummarySummary Companies Key House, Senate races still too close to callRepublican-controlled Congress would stymie Biden agendaPHOENIX, Ariz./BIRMINGHAM, Mich., Nov 8 (Reuters) - Control of Congress was up for grabs after Tuesday's U.S. midterm elections with many of the most competitive races uncalled, leaving it unclear whether Republicans would seize control from President Joe Biden's Democrats. In the House of Representatives, Republicans had been favored to win a majority that would allow them to halt Biden's legislative agenda. By early Wednesday, the party had flipped four Democratic House seats, Edison Research projected, one short of the number they need to take over the chamber. The Georgia Senate race could end up in a Dec. 6 runoff, possibly with Senate control at stake. Democrats currently control the 50-50 Senate with Vice President Kamala Harris able to break any ties.
Vance won Ohio's U.S. Senate race in Tuesday's midterm elections, but control of the chamber remained up for grabs with several contests too close to call. Democrats currently control the 50-50 Senate with Vice President Kamala Harris able to break any ties. In addition to every House seat, 35 Senate seats and three dozen governors' races are on the ballot. (Live election results from around the country are here.) In Pennsylvania, Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Mastriano, who sought to overturn the state's election results after Trump lost, was defeated by Democrat Josh Shapiro.
[1/14] A voter waits in line to cast their ballot during the midterm elections, in McAllen, Texas, U.S., November 8, 2022. REUTERS/Callaghan O'HarePHOENIX, Ariz./BIRMINGHAM, Mich., Nov 8 (Reuters) - Republicans were favored to wrest control of the U.S. House of Representatives away from President Joe Biden's Democrats based on early returns in Tuesday's midterm elections, though the prospects of a "red wave" appeared to have dimmed. But importantly, that number can change as close to 200 of the 435 House races had yet to be called, including some with vulnerable Republican incumbents. But even a narrow Republican House majority would be able to block Biden's priorities while launching politically damaging investigations into his administration and family. (Live election results from around the country are here.)
REUTERS/Mary F. CalvertPHOENIX, Ariz./BIRMINGHAM, Mich., Nov 8 (Reuters) - Senate incumbents including Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and senior Republican John Thune won re-election in Tuesday's U.S. midterm elections, on a day Republicans were expected to wrest control of Congress away from President Joe Biden's Democrats. Thirty-five Senate seats and all 435 House of Representatives seats are on the ballot. The final outcome, particularly control of the 50-50 Senate, is unlikely to be known any time soon. Democrats currently control that chamber through Vice President Kamala Harris' tie-breaking vote. The Georgia race could end up in a Dec. 6 runoff to determine which party holds the Senate.
DeSantis, a possible contender for the Republican presidential nomination in 2024, turned away Democratic Representative Charlie Crist, Edison Research projected. Seven Republicans also won U.S. Senate seats, according to Edison, though none was unexpected. Thirty-five Senate seats and all 435 House of Representatives seats are on the ballot. Republicans are widely favored to pick up the five seats they need to control the House, but control of the Senate could come down to tight races in Pennsylvania, Nevada, Georgia and Arizona. In Maricopa County, Arizona - a key battleground - the Republican Senate nominee, Blake Masters, and the national party filed an emergency lawsuit seeking to extend voting hours after some tabulation machines malfunctioned.
Edison Research projected that incumbent Republican Senators Tim Scott in South Carolina and Todd Young in Indiana would win re-election. Fox News projected Republican Rand Paul would win re-election in Kentucky and Democrat Peter Welch would win an open Senate seat in Vermont. I blame the current administration for that," said Bethany Hadelman, who said she voted for Republican candidates in Alpharetta, Georgia. A Republican Senate would hold sway over Biden's judicial nominations, including any Supreme Court vacancy, intensifying the spotlight on the increasingly conservative court. Those concerns swayed even some Republican leaning voters like Henry Bowden, 36, an Atlanta lawyer who said he voted for a mix of Republican and Democratic candidates.
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