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Search resuls for: "European Centre for Disease Prevention"


11 mentions found


Norway must keep virus restrictions until mid-December, PM says
  + stars: | 2020-11-25 | by ( Reuters Staff | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.99   time to read: +1 min
FILE PHOTO: Norway's Prime Minister Erna Solberg speaks during a news conference about the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Oslo, Norway September 3, 2020. Berit Roald/NTB Scanpix/via REUTERSOSLO (Reuters) - Norway must for the time being maintain its most recent restrictions on society to contain the spread of the coronavirus, and needs at least another three weeks to make an assessment, Prime Minister Erna Solberg said on Wednesday. European countries are grappling with how to contain the spread of the disease at the same time as their inhabitants want to celebrate Christmas and New Year. We must hold on,” Solberg told a news conference. But there are regional disparities and authorities are most concerned about the situation in the capital Oslo and other major cities.
Persons: Erna Solberg, Berit Roald, NTB, ” Solberg Organizations: Norway's, REUTERS, European Centre for Disease Prevention Locations: Oslo, Norway, REUTERS OSLO, Europe, Iceland, Finland, Ireland
Portugal to ban domestic travel, close schools around national holidays
  + stars: | 2020-11-21 | by ( Reuters Staff | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.85   time to read: +2 min
REUTERS/Rafael Marchante/File PhotoLISBON (Reuters) - Portugal is to ban domestic travel and close schools around two upcoming holidays in a bid to reduce the spread of coronavirus ahead of Christmas, Prime Minister Antonio Costa said on Saturday. Schools will close on the Mondays before both holidays, while businesses must close early. Employers are being encouraged to give workers the day off in order to minimise travel activity. “We continue to have a very high number of cases which is a threat to our health,” Costa told a press conference. Portugal reported 62 deaths and 6,472 cases of coronavirus on Saturday, mostly in the north of the country, bringing the total infections to 255,970 cases, with 3,824 deaths.
Persons: Rafael Marchante, Antonio Costa, ” Costa, Costa Organizations: REUTERS, Employers, European Centre for Disease Prevention Locations: Lisbon, Portugal, LISBON, Europe
LONDON — European governments should lift coronavirus lockdowns and other social restrictions gradually to prevent a third wave of infections, according to the president of the European Commission. Speaking Thursday evening, the EU's Ursula von der Leyen said that "expectations have to be managed." This will be very important to avoid the risk of yet another wave," von der Leyen said at a virtual press conference. Von der Leyen's comments come after positive news on the development of a Covid-19 vaccine. In this context, von der Leyen also said the EU would be starting an information campaign.
Persons: they'll, Ursula von der Leyen, von der Leyen, Von der, Nadia Calvino, Karen Tso Organizations: European Commission, Health, EU, European Centre for Disease Prevention, Control, Pfizer, BioNtech Locations: Europe, Belgium, France, Spain, Italy, Czech Republic, Austria, Luxembourg, Slovenia
Europe's second wave shows signs of slowing after new lockdowns
  + stars: | 2020-11-17 | by ( Silvia Amaro | ) www.cnbc.com + 0.00   time to read: +4 min
Diego Puletto | Getty Images News | Getty ImagesLONDON — The second wave of the coronavirus in Europe has started to show signs of slowing, but experts have warned that it's too early to get complacent. European countries have been grappling with a second wave of infections since September, but the latest numbers show a stabilization in new cases in Germany, Spain and Italy, and a decline in Belgium, France and the Netherlands. It comes after new lockdowns and tough social restrictions were reintroduced across numerous European countries in October in an effort to contain the second wave; the latest numbers suggest these steps seem to be working. However, despite this mixed picture, some are optimistic that Europe's latest set of restrictions might be eased in a few weeks. JP Morgan noted that the measures taken across the region in the wake of the second wave had started to bear fruit, meaning that they could potentially be eased in time for Christmas.
Persons: Diego Puletto, it's, Florian Hense, Simon Dellicour, Dellicour, Chancellor Angela Merkel, Lichtenstein, JP Morgan, David Mackie Organizations: Red Cross, Getty, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, CNBC, European Centre for Disease Prevention, John Hopkins University, JHU, JPMorgan Locations: Turin, Italy, Europe, Germany, Spain, Belgium, France, Netherlands, Czech Republic, Austria, Luxembourg
"European countries have made a choice, I suppose, that trying to keep schools open is very important." Boston public schools had begun a phased reopening, with the city's highest-need children returning from October 1. One key difference from the spring lockdowns in these two countries is that they have chosen to keep schools open. Amanda Spielman, chief education inspector at UK education watchdog Ofsted, said in a report published this week that the decision to keep schools open during England's second lockdown was "very good news indeed." While they may present a small risk to grandparents, Staines said, "the major risk to grandparents is the older adults in the house."
Persons: Micheál Martin, Martin, Anthony Staines, they're, Staines, DPSCD, Bill de Blasio, De Blasio, Evelyn Nunez, Marty Walsh, CNN's Jim Sciutto, Poppy Harlow, Walsh, CNN's Wolf, Brenda Cassellius, Amanda Spielman, they've, Angela Merkel, Merkel Organizations: London, CNN, Ireland, Health Systems, Dublin City University, Detroit Public Schools Community District, New, The, District of Philadelphia, Boston, Ofsted, European Centre for Disease Prevention, Control, European Union Locations: Covid, Germany, France, England, United States, Detroit, Boston, Philadelphia, Knutsford, Europe, Israel, New York City, Kew Gardens, Des Moines, Iowa, Mainz, Staines
Belgium has become a Covid hotspot. And there are four reasons why
  + stars: | 2020-11-06 | by ( Silvia Amaro | ) www.cnbc.com + 0.00   time to read: +3 min
Illustration picture shows a Covid-19 patient transferred by helicopter from the CHU hospital in Liege to Koln, Germany. ERIC LALMAND | AFP | Getty ImagesLONDON — The coronavirus pandemic is hitting Belgium particularly hard, with intensive care units at full capacity in Brussels. Belgium, where the main EU institutions are based, is experiencing some of the highest Covid-19 daily infections in Europe. Testing and high population densitySimon Dellicour, a bioengineer and research associate at the Universite Libre de Bruxelles, said the recent spike in cases is due to a "relatively high population density," increased testing capacity and a rapid relaxation of the rules at the end of the summer. In comparison with neighboring nations such as France and Germany, Belgium has a much higher number of people per square kilometer, which raises challenges when imposing social distancing.
Persons: ERIC LALMAND, Frank Vandenbroucke, Pieter Cleppe, Alexander de Croo, Thierry Monasse, Croo, Simon Dellicour, Dellicour Organizations: AFP, Getty, EU, European Centre for Disease Prevention, Control, Property Rights Alliance, CNBC, Flemish, Covid, Brussels Times, Universite Libre de, John Hopkins University Locations: Liege, Koln, Germany, Belgium, Brussels, Europe, France, Walloon
VIENNA (Reuters) - Austria on Saturday announced a nighttime curfew and the closure of cafes, bars and restaurants to all but take-away service as a surge in coronavirus infections threatens to overwhelm its hospitals. Austria's Chancellor Sebastian Kurz gestures as he speaks during a news conference, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in Vienna, Austria October 31, 2020. “We did not take this decision lightly but it is necessary,” Chancellor Sebastian Kurz told a news conference. Restaurants, bars and cafes may provide a take-away service only; theatres and museums will shut, as will indoor sports facilities such as gyms; hotels will close to all but a few guests such as business travellers. “A barely controllable increase has begun,” Health Minister Rudolf Anschober told the news conference, adding that infections were “de facto exploding”.
Persons: Sebastian Kurz, Leonhard Foeger, , Rudolf Anschober, ” Kurz Organizations: Saturday, Austria's, REUTERS, Factories, European Centre for Disease Prevention, , VIENNA (Reuters), REUTERS Locations: VIENNA, Austria, Vienna, Britain, Italy, Germany, Vienna
VIENNA (Reuters) - Austria on Saturday announced a nighttime curfew and the closure of cafes, bars and restaurants to all but take-away service as a surge in coronavirus infections threatens to overwhelm its hospitals. Austria's Chancellor Sebastian Kurz gestures as he speaks during a news conference, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in Vienna, Austria October 31, 2020. “We did not take this decision lightly but it is necessary,” Chancellor Sebastian Kurz told a news conference. Restaurants, bars and cafes may provide a take-away service only; theatres and museums will shut, as will indoor sports facilities such as gyms; hotels will close to all but a few guests such as business travellers. “A barely controllable increase has begun,” Health Minister Rudolf Anschober told the news conference, adding that infections were “de facto exploding”.
Persons: Sebastian Kurz, Leonhard Foeger, , Rudolf Anschober, ” Kurz Organizations: Saturday, Austria's, REUTERS, Factories, European Centre for Disease Prevention, , VIENNA (Reuters), REUTERS Locations: VIENNA, Austria, Vienna, Britain, Italy, Germany, Vienna
VIENNA (Reuters) - Austria on Saturday announced a nighttime curfew and the closure of cafes, bars and restaurants to all but take-away service as a surge in coronavirus infections threatens to overwhelm its hospitals. Austria's Chancellor Sebastian Kurz gestures as he speaks during a news conference, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in Vienna, Austria October 31, 2020. “We did not take this decision lightly but it is necessary,” Chancellor Sebastian Kurz told a news conference. Restaurants, bars and cafes may provide a take-away service only; theatres and museums will shut, as will indoor sports facilities such as gyms; hotels will close to all but a few guests such as business travellers. “A barely controllable increase has begun,” Health Minister Rudolf Anschober told the news conference, adding that infections were “de facto exploding”.
Persons: Sebastian Kurz, Leonhard Foeger, , Rudolf Anschober, ” Kurz Organizations: Saturday, Austria's, REUTERS, Factories, European Centre for Disease Prevention, , VIENNA (Reuters), REUTERS Locations: VIENNA, Austria, Vienna, Britain, Italy, Germany, Vienna
The bank decided to keep its rates and wider monetary policy unchanged, but suggested that additional policy action in the euro zone could come as soon as December. In September, the ECB estimated a contraction of 8% in euro zone GDP this year, followed by a rebound of 5% in 2021. The latest statement from the ECB suggests that policymakers will adjust their monetary policy based on those upcoming forecasts. Speaking at a press conference following the announcement, ECB President Lagarde said the euro area economic rebound was "losing momentum more rapidly than expected." We have done it for the first wave; we will do it again for the second wave," Lagarde said.
Persons: Christine Lagarde, Lagarde, we're, Christine Lagarde Organizations: European Central Bank, ECB, European Centre for Disease Prevention, Control Locations: Covid, Europe, France, Spain
Oke has been tracking Covid-19 fatality rates along with his colleague Carl Heneghan of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine and health economist Daniel Howdon. Their research shows that, at the end of June, the fatality rate was just below 3% in the UK. The lower death rate isn't unique to Europe. With more young people getting infected, the overall fatality rate has dropped, but this doesn't mean the virus itself has become any less deadly. This is partly down to different approaches to counting their Covid-19 cases.
Persons: Jason Oke, Oke, Carl Heneghan, Daniel Howdon, ", Julian Tang, Dr, Leora Horwitz, Horwitz, remdesivir, Tang, There's Organizations: CNN, European Centre for Disease Prevention, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, NYU Grossman School of Medicine, of Hospital Medicine, US Centers for Disease Control, NYU, London School of Economics, University of Leicester, of Population Health, NYU Langone Health, Intensive Care, Audit and Research, US Food and Drug Administration, Health Organization, Johns Hopkins University, CDC, France, Spain, Ireland Locations: Europe, United Kingdom, France, Spain, Germany, New York, United States, Belgium, Ireland, England, Wales, Northern Ireland, Covid, Mexico, Czech Republic, England
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