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Lilly spokesperson Kathryn Beiser and a Justice Department spokesperson declined to comment. The firm also has several lawyers whose reputations would carry weight with the Justice Department and the FDA, including former Attorney General Eric Holder, legal experts said. ANSWERING DIFFERENT QUESTIONSThe company-backed investigation was based on interviews with more than 100 people, the May 20 memo to Lilly employees said. The memo denies the company made false statements to the FDA. The company memo said Lilly couldn’t substantiate allegations that employees faced retaliation for refusing to make false statements.
Persons: Eli Lilly, Mike Segar, Lilly, Burling, Nellie Clark, Kathryn Beiser, Clark, Covington, it’s, , Paul Pelletier, Eric Holder, Gerald Masoudi, Masoudi, Amrit Mula, Mula, Trump, New Jersey Democrat Bob Menendez, ” Menendez Organizations: Reuters, U.S . Justice, Company, REUTERS, U.S . Food, Drug Administration, Washington D.C, Covington, Burling LLP, Justice Department, U.S . Securities, Exchange Commission, Justice, U.S, Department, FDA, New, New Jersey Democrat Locations: New Jersey, Branchburg , New Jersey, , New Jersey, Washington, Covington, Mula, U.S
An Eli Lilly and Company pharmaceutical manufacturing plant is pictured at 50 ImClone Drive in Branchburg, New Jersey, March 5, 2021. If the Justice Department concludes that an internal investigation was thorough, it can result in a non-prosecution agreement with few, if any, penalties, the experts said. The firm also has several lawyers whose reputations would carry weight with the Justice Department and the FDA, including former Attorney General Eric Holder, legal experts said. ANSWERING DIFFERENT QUESTIONSThe company-backed investigation was based on interviews with more than 100 people, the May 20 memo to Lilly employees said. The company memo said Lilly couldn’t substantiate allegations that employees faced retaliation for refusing to make false statements.
Persons: Eli Lilly, Mike Segar, LLY.N, Lilly, Burling, Nellie Clark, Kathryn Beiser, Clark, Covington, it’s, , Paul Pelletier, Eric Holder, Gerald Masoudi, Masoudi, Amrit Mula, Mula, Trump, New Jersey Democrat Bob Menendez, Menendez Organizations: Company, REUTERS, U.S . Justice, Reuters, U.S . Food, Drug Administration, Washington D.C, Covington, Burling LLP, Justice Department, U.S . Securities, Exchange Commission, Justice, U.S, Department, FDA, New, New Jersey Democrat, Thomson Locations: Branchburg , New Jersey, New Jersey, , New Jersey, Washington, Covington, Mula, U.S
Justice Department to End Pursuit of Reporters’ Contact Records Over Leaks
  + stars: | 2021-06-05 | by ( Aruna Viswanatha | ) www.wsj.com sentiment -0.98   time to read: +1 min
The Justice Department said it would no longer seek records of reporters’ contacts when investigating government leaks of sensitive information—a change that reverses a longstanding practice after President Biden said he believed it was wrong. Prosecutors have sought such records in leak investigations for years, often after exhausting other options for identifying suspects. Under the Obama administration, for example, the Justice Department used the tool for investigations involving reporting by the Associated Press and Fox News. Multiple former government employees and senior officials were prosecuted by the Obama Justice Department. The measures included requiring prosecutors to give a media organization notice before a subpoena could be issued to seize records, unless the attorney general certified that doing so would harm the investigation.
Persons: Biden, Anthony Coley, Saturday, , Trump, Obama, Eric Holder Organizations: Department, Washington Post, CNN, New York Times, Prosecutors, Justice Department, Associated Press, Fox News, Obama Justice Department
Justice Department to End Pursuit of Reporters’ Phone Records Over Leaks
  + stars: | 2021-06-05 | by ( Aruna Viswanatha | ) www.wsj.com sentiment -0.98   time to read: +1 min
The Justice Department said it would no longer seek reporters’ phone records when investigating government leaks of sensitive information—a change that reverses a longstanding practice after President Biden said he believed it was wrong. Prosecutors have sought such records in leak investigations for years often after exhausting other options for identifying suspects. Under the Obama administration, for example, the Justice Department used the tool for investigations involving reporting by the Associated Press and Fox News. Multiple former government employees and senior officials were prosecuted by the Obama Justice Department. The measures included requiring prosecutors to give a media organization notice before a subpoena could be issued to seize records, unless the attorney general certified that doing so would harm the investigation.
Persons: Biden, Anthony Coley Saturday, , Trump, Obama, Eric Holder Organizations: Department, Washington Post, CNN, New York Times, Prosecutors, Justice Department, Associated Press, Fox News, Obama Justice Department
WASHINGTON — The Trump Justice Department secretly obtained the phone records of four New York Times reporters as part of a leak investigation, the newspaper reported Wednesday. The Justice Department did not disclose which article it was investigating, according to the newspaper. Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The Times, said in a statement published by the newspaper that seizing reporters’ phone records “profoundly undermines press freedom. CNN later revealed that the department had seized phone records of its Pentagon correspondent, Barbara Starr. After those disclosures, Biden told a reporter he would not allow the Justice Department to persist in obtaining reporter phone records.
Persons: WASHINGTON, Donald Trump’s, Joe Biden, , , Anthony Coley, Matt Apuzzo, Adam Goldman, Eric Lichtblau, Michael S, Schmidt, Lichtblau, Coley, ” Coley, James Comey, Hillary Clinton, Dean Baquet, ” Baquet, Barbara Starr, Biden, Eric Holder, Jeff Sessions Organizations: Trump Justice Department, New York Times, Justice Department, , Department, The Justice, The, Washington Post, CNN, Pentagon, Democratic, Republican Locations:
Biden says he won't allow Justice Dept. to seize reporters' records
  + stars: | 2021-05-22 | by ( ) www.nbcnews.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: +1 min
President Joe Biden says he won’t allow the Department of Justice to seize journalists’ phone records and emails, calling the practice “wrong” in a significant departure from his predecessors. The Washington Post also disclosed that the Justice Department had last year seized phone records belonging to three of its journalists who covered the Russia investigation. When asked if Biden would prevent his Justice Department from seeking reporters' phone records, Biden responded: “I won't let that happen.”His comments, however, seem to contradict those made earlier by White House press secretary Jen Psaki when asked how the administration viewed the practice of obtaining journalists’ records. Psaki suggested that the Justice Department would use the “Holder model,” a reference to Obama-era Attorney General Eric Holder. In 2013, the Justice Department secretly obtained records of a number of Associated Press journalists in a leak investigation.
Persons: Joe Biden, It’s, , Trump, Biden, Jen Psaki, , Psaki, Obama, Eric Holder, Holder Organizations: Department of Justice, White, CNN, Justice Department, Washington Post, Associated Press Locations: Russia
President Joe Biden told CNN he would not allow the DOJ to seize records from reporters. His remarks come after reports said the DOJ covertly obtained email and phone records from journalists with The Washington Post and CNN. The DOJ obtained Starr's personal and work email, as well as her phone records, between June 1, 2017, and July 31, 2017. Hours before Biden gave his direct remarks, White House press secretary Jen Psaki said ultimately, the Justice Department would have the final say. "And the Justice Department conveyed yesterday that they intend to meet with reporters to hear their concerns about recent notices."
Persons: Joe Biden, Biden, Trump, Barbara Starr, Starr, Obama, White, Jen Psaki, Psaki, Eric Holder, Insider's Azmi Haroun Organizations: CNN, DOJ, The Washington Post, of Justice, Department, Washington Post, Justice Department, United States Department of Justice, Pentagon, Prosecutors, Biden, Justice
CNN: Trump Justice Department seized reporter's email and phone records
  + stars: | 2021-05-21 | by ( ) www.nbcnews.com + 0.00   time to read: +3 min
WASHINGTON — The Trump administration Justice Department secretly obtained the 2017 phone records of a CNN correspondent, the network said Thursday in revealing the existence of another apparent leak investigation aimed at identifying a journalist’s sources. The revelation comes two weeks after The Washington Post disclosed that the Justice Department had last year seized phone records belonging to three of its journalists who covered the Russia investigation. CNN said the Justice Department informed Pentagon correspondent Barbara Starr in a May 13 letter that it had obtained phone and email records covering a two-month period between June 1 and July 31, 2017. “We are asking for an immediate meeting with the Justice Department for an explanation.”The Justice Department confirmed that the records were formally sought last year, though it did not reveal anything else about the investigation and what story might pertain to. “The records at issue relate to 2017 and the legal process to seek these records was approved in 2020,” Justice Department spokesman Anthony Coley said in a statement.
Persons: WASHINGTON, Trump, Barbara Starr, , Jeff Zucker, Donald Trump, Anthony Coley, Merrick, Garland’s, Eric Holder, Bruce Brown, ” Brown, Organizations: Justice Department, CNN, Washington Post, Pentagon, “ CNN, , “ Department, CNN Pentagon, The, Department, Freedom, Press, Trump Justice Department Locations: Russia, Syria, Afghanistan, North Korea
REUTERS/Jonathan ErnstU.S. President Joe Biden on Friday said he would not allow his Justice Department to seize the phone or email records of reporters, saying any such move would be "simply wrong." Biden's comments came a day after CNN reported that the Justice Department had told its correspondent Barbara Starr that the former Trump administration had secretly obtained two months of her phone and email records in 2017. The Washington Post earlier this month said the Trump administration had also secretly obtained the phone records of three of its reporters over work they did in 2017. "Absolutely, positively, it's wrong," Biden told reporters after a joint news conference with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Biden's press secretary, Jen Psaki, told reporters earlier Friday that the Justice Department intends to meet with media representatives following CNN’s revelation.
Persons: Joe Biden, Jonathan Ernst U.S, Barbara Starr, Trump, Biden, Moon Jae, It's, Wolf Blitzer, Jen Psaki, , , Eric Holder, Barack Obama, Holder, Donald Trump Organizations: White, REUTERS, Department, CNN, Justice Department, Washington Post, South Korean, Justice, Biden's, Associated Press, Fox News, National Press, Trump, Thomson Locations: Israel, Washington , U.S
WASHINGTON — The Justice Department confirmed Friday that it sought the phone records of three Washington Post reporters for calls they made during three months in 2017 while reporting on Russia’s role in the 2016 presidential election. The subpoenas sought records that would show who the reporters called and how long their conversations lasted but not what was discussed. Justice Department spokesman Marc Raimondi confirmed the content of the letters in a statement. A department spokesman said the records of the Post reporters were sought in 2020, when William Barr was still serving as then-President Donald Trump's attorney general. But the Justice Department has maintained that it would seek journalist records as a last resort.
Persons: WASHINGTON, Ellen Nakashima, Greg Miller, Adam Entous, Sen, Jeff Sessions, Trump, Sergey Kislyak, Marc Raimondi, William Barr, Donald Trump's, Barr, Cameron Barr, Obama, Eric Holder Organizations: The Justice Department, Washington Post, Justice, Department, , Post . Government, Justice Department, Associated Press, Fox News Locations: U.S
Opinion | Liz Cheney, We Have a Memory. You’re No Hero.
  + stars: | 2021-05-05 | by ( Charles M. Blow | ) www.nytimes.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: +2 min
As if we don’t know what they are, as if the horribleness of Trump redeems them for relative measure. With respect to Dick Cheney, I ask you to recall just one thing: the torture program under the Bush administration. The torture gene must run in the family, for Liz Cheney praised the Trump administration’s review of the treatment of terrorism suspects. ‘It’s been clear, certainly since we stopped the enhanced interrogation program, we’re not even in a position anymore, frankly, where we’re very often capturing people,’ Cheney said. In 2010, an ad by Liz Cheney’s “Keep America Safe” group attacked Eric Holder’s Justice Department.
Persons: Dick Cheney, Bush, He’s, Liz Cheney, HuffPost, “ Cheney, Al, Osama bin, ‘ It’s, we’re, ’ Cheney, , , birthers, Barack Obama, , Liz Cheney’s “, Eric Holder’s, Ken Starr, Cheney, Hillary Clinton’s, Trump Organizations: Trump, CNN, , America, Department, DOJ, Department of Jihad, Justice Department, Associated Press Locations: Al Qaeda, Al
The nonprofit National Redistricting Action Fund, which is affiliated with former Attorney General Eric Holder's National Democratic Redistricting Committee (NDRC), brought the lawsuits on behalf of several individual voters in each state. Both Pennsylvania and Louisiana have Democratic governors who can veto maps produced by their Republican-controlled legislatures. Adam Kincaid, the executive director of the Republican counterpart to the NDRC, the National Republican Redistricting Trust, dismissed the litigation. Both parties are readying for a fierce contest over redistricting, the once-a-decade process by which states redraw their electoral maps for congressional and state legislative districts based on the census count. "I have no doubt that the same Republican legislators who have pushed these bills will now try to use the redistricting process to illegitimately lock in power for that party for the next decade," he said.
Persons: Brendan McDermid, Eric Holder's, Marc Elias, Joe Biden's, Elias, Adam Kincaid, Holder Organizations: U.S, Census, REUTERS, Democratic, U.S . Census, Electoral College, Redistricting, Fund, Democratic Redistricting, Republican, Senate, Census Bureau, National Republican Redistricting Trust, U.S . House, Thomson Locations: New York City , New York, U.S, Pennsylvania , Minnesota, Louisiana, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Texas, Florida, North Carolina
Tony West became Uber's chief legal officer in 2017, after a lengthy recruitment effort. West wanted to know Uber was serious about fixing its problems before he joined the company. But it was Uber's new CEO, Dara Khosrowshahi, who would win West over. West was impressed by Khosrowshahi's decision to correct a mistake that he wasn't responsible for, without any outside pressure forcing his hand. "This was a very early signal to me that I had made the right decision," West said.
Persons: Tony West, West, Uber, Dara Khosrowshahi, Eric Holder, Holder, Travis, Del, Khosrowshahi, Khosrowshahi's, West's, Kalanick, Read, Dara Khosrowshahi's Organizations: Obama, Department of Justice, West, PepsiCo, Justice Department Locations: West, Manhattan
Lisa Monaco is among the former aides of Robert Mueller joining the Biden-era Justice Department. Only one member of the special counsel's office has joined the Biden administration so far. AP Photo/Harry HamburgThe Uber lawyerCarlin and Monaco could soon be joined at the Justice Department by another former aide from Mueller's FBI tenure. A DOJ spokesman did not respond to a request for comment about Olsen's possible appointment inside the Biden administration. So far only one member of Mueller's special counsel office, Elizabeth Prelogar, has made the jump into the Biden administration.
Persons: Lisa Monaco, Robert Mueller, Matt Olsen, Mueller, Biden, Trump, John Carlin, Carlin, Obama, Eric Holder, Amy Jeffress, Edgar Hoover, we're, Lisa, Ken Wainstein, George W, Bush, Harry Hamburg, Merrick Garland, Olsen, Holder, Uber, Elizabeth Prelogar, Cooley, Prelogar, Department's, Elena Kagan, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Garland Organizations: Biden, Department, FBI, Monaco, Capitol, Justice Department's, Justice Department, Davis, Polk, Wardwell, House Intelligence, AP, National Counterterrorism Center, Justice, Oklahoma, Trump, National Security Agency, Harvard Law School, DOJ, Cooley, Mueller's, Senate Locations: Russia, Obama's, Washington, Monaco, Guantanamo, Trump
Dara Khosrowshahi prioritized fixing Uber's culture when he became CEO in 2017. His efforts have largely been successful, Uber employees and a Wall Street analyst told Insider. With Uber, Khosrowshahi could do something big. Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesBy the time Huffington called Khosrowshahi, Uber was a mess. Insider spoke with 21 current and former Uber employees about Khosrowshahi's key decisions, and the ways Uber's internal culture has changed under him.
Persons: Dara Khosrowshahi, he's, Arianna Huffington, Recode, Huffington, Khosrowshahi, Travis Kalanick, — Daniel Ek, , Ek, Susan Fowler, Uber, Justin Sullivan, Lyft, Dan Ives, Ives, Uber's, Eric Holder, Mike Isaac's, nauseated, Kalanick, Liane Hornsey, Anushree Fadnavis, Reuters Khosrowshahi, Isaac, haven't, Tony West, West, Obama, Joe Sullivan, Sullivan, Tasos Katopodis, Sullivan's, it's, Ally Coll, Kate Parker, Dara, Richard Drew, Lisa Stoner, George Floyd, Derek Chauvin, Floyd, Dianna Jones, Jones, Black, Eric Risberg Organizations: Wall, Bloomberg, Wedbush Securities, Reuters, PepsiCo, New York Times, The Times, Uber, Department of Justice, Federal Trade Commission, Times, West, Black Locations: Expedia, Asia, Europe, Las Vegas, Manhattan, West, Khosrowshahi, Iran, California
AG Merrick Garland rescinded a Trump-era memo curtailing the DOJ's use of consent decrees. Under Obama, the DOJ entered into consent decrees with police in Ferguson, Missouri and Baltimore. WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Merrick Garland on Friday rescinded a Trump-era memo that curtailed the use of consent decrees that federal prosecutors have used in sweeping investigations of police departments. Democrats have long argued the ability of the Justice Department's civil rights division to conduct sweeping probes of police departments had been curtailed under President Donald Trump. The civil rights investigations often ended with court-approved consent decrees that mandated reforms.
Persons: Merrick Garland, Obama, General Merrick Garland, Garland, Read, I've, Daunte, Jeff Sessions, Donald Trump, Department didn't, William Barr, Eric Holder, Michael Brown, Freddie Gray Organizations: Trump, DOJ, WASHINGTON, , Justice Department, Democrats, Justice, Departmental, The, Department Locations: Ferguson , Missouri, Baltimore
Live Updates: Senate Panel to Focus on Voting Rights
  + stars: | 2021-03-24 | by ( Annie Karni | Catie Edmondson | ) www.nytimes.com + 0.00   time to read: +13 min
ET Live Updates: Senate Panel to Focus on Voting Rights The Senate Rules Committee is holding a hearing Wednesday morning on its plan to overhaul federal elections. Two Democratic senators pressure President Biden to focus on Asian-American and Pacific Islander representation in his administration. Senator Chuck Schumer of New York, the Democratic majority leader, speaking about the voting rights bill last week. Dr. Murthy, 43, helped found Doctors for Obama, a group that worked to elect Mr. Obama and now works to expand health care access for Americans. The twin pieces of legislation passed in the House have been deemed ineffective and too expansive by most Republicans; only eight House Republicans voted to advance the universal background check legislation.
Persons: Biden, Chuck Schumer, Anna Moneymaker, Eric Holder, , Amy Klobuchar, , , Mac Warner, Todd Rokita, Tom Cotton, Tammy Duckworth, Biden’s, Brandon Bell, Jen Psaki, Mr, ” “, Ms, Psaki, Tammy Duckworth of, Duckworth, Hirono, Ben Garmisa, ” Mr, Garmisa, ” Nicholas Fandos, Vivek Murthy, , Caroline Brehman Dr, Obama, Murthy, Barack Obama, Donald J, Trump, Alice Chen, Dr, Stephen Speranza, “ There’s, John Thune of, Mitch McConnell of, McConnell, Annie Karni Organizations: Democratic, The New York, Republican, Commission, Wednesday, Republicans, White, Senate, The New York Times, White House, American Pacific, Pacific Islanders, Pacific, Twitter, Health, Education, Labor, Pensions Committee, Doctors, America, Harvard University, Democrats Locations: New York, Minnesota, West Virginia, Indiana, Arkansas, Hawaii, Atlanta, Washington, United States, India, England, Miami, Boulder, Colo . Credit, Colorado, John Thune of South Dakota, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky
A Senate committee held an in-depth hearing on S.1., Democrats' flagship voting rights bill. The Senate Rules Committee held a hearing on S.1., or the For the People Act, congressional Democrats' flagship election and democracy reform bill that expands federal regulations on campaign finance, ethics, and election policy. Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., the ranking member of the Senate Rules Committee, speaks during a hearing on the "For the People Act." Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., listens as the Senate Rules Committee holds a hearing on the "For the People Act." Schumer said the Rules hearing was the first committee hearing he had attended as majority leader "because I believe this issue is so, so important."
Persons: Sen, Amy Klobuchar, Member Sen, Roy Blunt, Michael Waldman, Scott J, Eric Holder, Jessica Huseman, Chuck Schumer, It's, Mitch McConnell, Schumer, McConnell, Jocelyn Benson Michigan, Todd Rokita, State Mac, Warner, Rokita, Mario Tama, Jocelyn Benson, it's, Benson Organizations: 116th, Senate, Republicans, Member, Brennan Center for Justice, Jocelyn Benson Michigan Office, AP, Indiana, West Virginia, State, State Mac Warner, Democratic Locations: Congress, Arizona, West Virginia, . County, Norwalk , California, Michigan, Indiana
Attorney General Merrick Garland can go by many different titles. Justice Department officials and the wider legal community have been facing a dilemma more titular than titillating lately: What to call the new attorney general? On the menu of options for the Justice Department leader is Mr. or Mrs. Attorney General, or simply "general," a shorthand that has survived in spite of being grammatically incorrect. "Mr. Attorney General" or "Mrs. Attorney General" can sound stilted or wordy. "In the UK they call the attorney general attorney,' which struck me as a little more fitting," Mukasey told Insider.
Persons: Merrick Garland, Garland's, titillating, Garland, Joe Biden, William Barr, , Michael Mukasey, George W, Bush, Anna Moneymaker, Alberto Gonzales, Mukasey, bristled, Jessie Liu, Trump, Liu, Obama, Eric Holder, Holder, Rod Rosenstein, Mr Organizations: Justice Department, Democratic, Republican, Appeals, DC Circuit, DOJ, DC, Justice, Texas Supreme, Senate Locations: Washington, Manhattan
Wilkinson, who once served as former Attorney General Eric Holder's deputy chief of staff, was not a Trump appointee when he received the complaints about Joshua Stern, an attorney detailed to the Western District of Texas in 2017. "He voiced repeated concern about the separation of the children from their parents," the memo said of Stern. "He commented that our prosecutions resulted in children separated from their parents when the parents were often fleeing violence in their home country. Wilkinson, who is serving temporarily as acting attorney general until Biden’s nominee for attorney general, Merrick Garland, is confirmed, has largely been seen as a long-serving career official whose low profile has kept him out of handling anything that could be considered controversial or a conflict of interest for the incoming administration. Attorneys, “plays an administrative role related to the associated paperwork but does not make decisions on assignments” regarding detailed personnel.
Persons: Joe Biden's, Monty Wilkinson, Wilkinson, Eric Holder's, Joshua Stern, Holder, Stern’s, Stern, Western District of Texas Richard L, Durbin, ” Durbin, , Merrick Garland, Robert M, Monty, , reassign Stern, Biden, Trump Organizations: WASHINGTON, Justice Department, NBC News, Trump, Western, Western District of, U.S, Attorneys, Attorney, United, . Department of Justice, Guardian, White, Biden Locations: Western District, Western District of Texas, El Paso, Washington
Tyson Foods terminated seven employees from an Iowa pork plant following an independent investigation into allegations that management wagered on how many workers would get infected with Covid-19, the meat processing giant announced on Wednesday. All of those fired were plant management employees at the facility in Waterloo, Iowa. According to the suit, 1,000 of 2,800 employees at the Waterloo plant were infected. Tyson said Banks and others immediately traveled to Waterloo to meet with plant team members and community leaders "to reinforce Tyson’s commitment to them and the community." 'Black Hawk County Sheriff Tony Thompson visited the Waterloo plant in the spring and said that conditions were so awful that they "shook" him "to the core," according to the suit.
Persons: Tyson, , Dean Banks, Isidro Fernandez, Eric Holder, Burling, Banks, Tony Thompson Organizations: Tyson Foods, Tyson Foods Inc, Covington, Burling LLP Locations: Iowa, Waterloo , Iowa, Waterloo, Hawk
A report from the Institute for Policy Studies found that billionaires saw their wealth increase by almost $1 trillion during the pandemic. Meanwhile, thousands of the frontline workers they employ fell ill or did not receive hazard pay. During the economic downturn from 2007 to 2009, he said, billionaires' wealth went down along with everyone else. While hazard pay ended at many companies during the summer, "since then, the pandemic has worsened but business has boomed." But the conversation around hazard pay and supporting frontline workers isn't at the same pitch as it was in March and April.
Persons: John H, Tyson, Eric Holder, Jeff Bezos, Amazon, Chuck Collins, That's, Collins, hasn't Organizations: Institute for Policy Studies, Tyson Foods, Business, Amazon, Brookings Locations: America
Tyson Foods said on Thursday it suspended employees without pay and hired former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder to conduct an investigation in response to a wrongful death lawsuit that alleges managers at an Iowa pork plant took bets on how many employees would catch Covid-19. The son of a worker at a Tyson facility in Waterloo, Iowa, who died in April of complications from the virus, filed a lawsuit that claims plant managers misled workers about Covid-19 and allowed sick employees to continue working. The worker, Isidro Fernandez, got sick because of his job, according to the lawsuit that was amended on Nov. 11. The Waterloo facility is Tyson's largest U.S. pork plant, processing 19,500 hogs a day, or about 5% of total U.S. pork production. Covid-19 infected more than 1,000 employees out of about 2,800 at the plant, and five died, the lawsuit says.
Persons: Tyson Foods, Eric Holder, Isidro Fernandez, Tyson idled, Tom Hart, Hart, Tyson, Burling, Holder, Marc Perrone Organizations: Smithfield Foods, Covington, Iowa Capital Dispatch, United Food & Commercial Workers International Union Locations: Iowa, Tyson, Waterloo , Iowa, Waterloo
FILE PHOTO: A Tyson Foods pork processing plant, temporarily closed due to an outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), is seen in Waterloo, Iowa, U.S. April 29, 2020. The son of a worker at a Tyson facility in Waterloo, Iowa, who died in April of complications from the virus, filed a lawsuit that claims plant managers misled workers about COVID-19 and allowed sick employees to continue working. The worker, Isidro Fernandez, got sick because of his job, according to the lawsuit that was amended on Nov. 11. The Waterloo facility is Tyson’s largest U.S. pork plant, processing 19,500 hogs a day, or about 5% of total U.S. pork production. COVID-19 infected more than 1,000 employees out of about 2,800 at the plant, and five died, the lawsuit says.
Persons: Eric Holder, Brenna, Isidro Fernandez, Tyson idled, Tom Hart “, Hart, Tyson, Burling, Holder, , , Marc Perrone Organizations: CHICAGO, Tyson Foods Inc, REUTERS, Smithfield Foods, Covington, Iowa Capital Dispatch, United Food & Commercial Workers International Union Locations: Iowa, Waterloo , Iowa, U.S, Tyson, Waterloo
FILE PHOTO: Former Acting U.S. Attorney General Sally Yates speaks by video feed during the virtual 2020 Democratic National Convention, August 18, 2020. She is perhaps best known for being fired from her position as acting attorney general by Republican President Donald Trump in his first month in office when she refused to enforce his first attempt at banning travelers from Muslim-majority nations. CONFRONTING RACIAL INJUSTICEThat has led Democrats, including Biden to rethink policies, including mandatory minimum sentences, that have led to the disproportionate incarceration of African-American men. Yates, during her 2015 confirmation hearing for deputy attorney general, called mandatory minimum sentences “an important tool for prosecutors” that could be used more effectively due to the “fiscal reality” facing U.S. prisons. She also persuaded Obama-era Attorney General Eric Holder to expand on his new policy scaling back the use of mandatory minimums and later publicly rebuked Trump’s first attorney general, Jeff Sessions, after he reversed these policies in 2017.
Persons: Joe Biden, Sally Yates, Donald Trump, Barack Obama, Yates, Biden, , Rachel Barkow, George Floyd, Department’s, Deborah Leff, Leff, Yates ’, Obama, Eric Holder, Trump’s, Jeff Sessions, , Sally, George Floyd’s, Vanita Gupta Organizations: WASHINGTON, U.S, Convention, Republican, Department of Justice, Democratic, Biden, U.S . Senate, Yates, New York University, . Sentencing Commission, . Sentencing, White, Prisons, Conference, Civil Locations: United States, Minneapolis, Atlanta
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