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The G-21 talks have focused on a $1.2 trillion, eight-year spending plan, with a mix of new and repurposed funding. “I’m hopeful we can get a positive response from the White House today,” he told CNBC in an interview. The two sides will meet at the White House at 11:45 a.m. EDT (1545 GMT), the White House said in a statement. STICKING POINTThe White House opened talks with the group after Biden broke off negotiations with Republican Senator Shelley Capito. The White House said her proposals had fallen short of meeting “the essential needs of our country”.
Persons: Mitch McConnell, Joe Biden, Jonathan Ernst, , Rob Portman, , Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Schumer, ” Schumer, Biden, Shelley Capito, Republicans chafed, we’re, Joe Manchin, Manchin, Kamala Harris Organizations: WASHINGTON, Republican, White, REUTERS, Democrats, Democratic, CNBC, White House, Biden, Democrat, Republicans, Congressional Locations: Washington , U.S
Biden gives green light to bipartisan infrastructure plan
  + stars: | 2021-06-24 | by ( David Morgan | Richard Cowan | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +4 min
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -U.S. President Joe Biden on Thursday embraced a bipartisan Senate deal to spend hundreds of billions of dollars on infrastructure projects, building roads, bridges and highways and helping stimulate the economy. U.S. President Joe Biden speaks to Senator Rob Portman (R-OH), following a bipartisan meeting with U.S. senators about the proposed framework for the infrastructure bill, at the White House in Washington, U.S., June 24, 2021. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque“We have a deal,” Biden told reporters, flanked by Democratic and Republican senators who wrote the $1.2 trillion proposal, which came after months of White House negotiations with lawmakers. Democratic and Republican members of the group displayed high spirits, chuckling and smiling together at microphones in the driveway of the White House. Biden was due to speak further about the deal at the White House at 2 p.m.
Persons: Joe Biden, Rob Portman, Kevin Lamarque “, ” Biden, Republican Rob Portman, , Mitch McConnell, Mitt Romney, Biden, Portman, McConnell, ” Portman, hasn’t, ” McConnell, , There’s, John Thune, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Schumer, ” Schumer, Pelosi, Republicans chafed, Lisa Murkowski, Thune Organizations: WASHINGTON, White, REUTERS, Democratic, Republican, Democrats, White House, Capitol, Biden, Democrat, Republicans, Congressional, Office Locations: Washington , U.S, White, Alaska
The second measure would be passed through a Senate maneuver called reconciliation here, which would allow it to take effect without Republican votes. “I expect that in the coming months this summer, before the fiscal year is over, that we will have voted on this (bipartisan) bill - the infrastructure bill - as well as voted on the budget resolution,” Biden told reporters at the White House. “It almost makes your head spin.”McConnell, Pelosi and Schumer have not been directly involved with the bipartisan infrastructure talks. Slideshow ( 6 images )RECONCILIATION REDUXPelosi said the House would vote on the bipartisan bill only after the Senate had also approved the additional reconciliation bill. Republicans chafed at his definition of infrastructure, which included fighting climate change and providing care for children and the elderly.
Persons: Joe Biden, , ” Biden, Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer, I’m, Mitch McConnell, ” McConnell, Pelosi, Schumer, McConnell, , Lindsey Graham, Biden, Donald Trump’s, ” Schumer, Republicans chafed, John Thune Organizations: WASHINGTON, U.S, Republican, White, Internal Revenue Service, Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Democratic, Republicans, Congressional, Office Locations: U.S, Washington
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democrats in Congress and at the White House nudged Republicans on Wednesday to join them in forging an agreement on a $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan. Two senior Democrats said they expected Wednesday’s meetings to yield results in negotiations that began after Biden rejected a Republican infrastructure proposal just over two weeks ago. The White House team includes Biden’s legislative director Louisa Terrell and Steve Ricchetti, counselor to the president. Senate Budget Committee Chairman Bernie Sanders is working up a far more ambitious infrastructure blueprint of $6 trillion. That maneuver would require all 48 Democrats and the two independents that caucus with them to agree.
Persons: Tom Brenner, Jon Tester, , Joe Biden, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Biden, Obama, Todd Young, Hakeem Jeffries, Louisa Terrell, Steve Ricchetti, Bernie Sanders, Schumer, Kamala Harris Organizations: WASHINGTON, White House nudged Republicans, U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, ” Democratic, Democrat, White, Republicans, Republican, Reuters, ” House Democratic, Senate, Democratic Locations: Washington , U.S
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Democrats in the U.S. Congress and at the White House nudged Republicans on Wednesday to join them in forging an agreement on a $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan by the end of business on Thursday. A second Democratic negotiator, Senator Joe Manchin, told reporters they hoped to have a deal before the Senate breaks on Thursday for the July 4 Independence Day holiday. Senate Budget Committee Chairman Bernie Sanders is working up a far more ambitious infrastructure blueprint of $6 trillion. Schumer has said he plans to hold a July vote on a bipartisan infrastructure bill and follow up in the autumn with a second Democratic-only measure. That maneuver would require all 48 Democrats and the two independents that caucus with them to agree.
Persons: Jon Tester, Joe Manchin, , Joe Biden, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, Biden, Obama, Todd Young, Bernie Sanders, Schumer, Kamala Harris Organizations: WASHINGTON, U.S . Congress, White House nudged Republicans, ” Democratic, Reuters, Democratic, Democrat, Republican, White, Republicans, Senate
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -A bipartisan group of U.S. senators sought agreement on a $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan by the end of business on Thursday, with President Joe Biden awaiting final numbers and multiple meetings with White House officials on the agenda. Although not taking part directly, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, in an interview with Fox News Radio, called the talks “constructive” but said it was “too early to say” whether a deal would emerge. The White House turned its attention to the group of 21 senators after Biden rejected a Republican infrastructure proposal just over two weeks ago. Asked how he felt about the bipartisan infrastructure plan, Biden told reporters: “I’ll tell you that when I get the final numbers tonight.”A sticking point is how to pay for it. Schumer has said he plans to hold a July vote on a bipartisan infrastructure bill and follow up in the autumn with a second Democratic-only measure.
Persons: Joe Biden, Jon Tester, Joe Manchin, , Biden, Mitch McConnell, Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, , Obama, Todd Young, Bernie Sanders, Schumer, Kamala Harris Organizations: WASHINGTON, White, Democratic, Democrat, Republican, Fox News Radio, Republicans, Senate, Reuters
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Republicans in the narrowly divided U.S. Senate on Tuesday blocked an election reform bill considered a top priority by Democrats seeking to offset a wave of laws passed by Republican-led state legislatures that impose new limits on voting. The 50-50 party-line vote fell short of the 60-vote threshold to advance most legislation in the Senate, sparking new calls by some Democrats to rethink that rule, known as the filibuster. Republicans argued that the bill infringed on states’ rights to set voting policy. Those claims were rejected by multiple courts, state election authorities and Trump’s own administration. The court in coming days could further weaken the Voting Rights Act in a ruling on voting restrictions in Arizona.
Persons: Chuck Schumer, Joe Biden, ” Biden, “ I’ve, Donald Trump’s, Mitch McConnell, , Marco Rubio, , Joe Manchin, Steny Hoyer, Debbie Stabenow Organizations: WASHINGTON, Senate, Republican, Republicans, Democratic, Democrats, Constitution, NEXT, Moderate Democratic, Justice Department, Civil Rights Division Locations: U.S, Florida, Washington, United States, Arizona
Democrats' voting rights plan faces long odds in U.S. Senate
  + stars: | 2021-06-22 | by ( Richard Cowan | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +4 min
Voting stickers are seen at the Franklin County Board of Elections in Columbus, Ohio U.S., October 28, 2016. "How does making it a crime to give food or water to voters waiting in long lines at the polls deter voter fraud?" Republicans say the state measures are needed to stop fraud, which former President Donald Trump falsely claimed resulted in his November defeat. That would require winning over moderate Democrat Joe Manchin, who opposes the House bill and a companion Senate bill and has been trying to find Republicans to join a bipartisan measure. But the Constitution also allows Washington to alter those rules, and Democrats argue they are only setting some minimum standards for states.
Persons: Shannon Stapleton, Chuck Schumer, Schumer, Donald Trump, Joe Manchin, Mitch McConnell, They've, McConnell, Wendy Weiser, Richard Cowan, Chris Kahn, Makini Brice, Susan Cornwell, David Morgan, Scott Malone, Cynthia Osterman Organizations: Franklin County Board, Columbus , Ohio U.S, REUTERS, WASHINGTON, Republican, Republicans, Senate, Constitution, Reuters, U.S . Senate, House, Center for Justice, Thomson Locations: Franklin County, Columbus , Ohio, United States, Washington, Georgia, Iowa, Florida
"It's an important step today to get every senator on record about willingness to talk about protecting our democracy. And if that fails, then the Democrats are going to have to talk about what the next path forward is," said Democratic Senator Elizabeth Warren. Activists and many Democratic lawmakers say reforming or scrapping the filibuster is necessary to pass legislation to move forward on key parts of President Joe Biden's agenda, including on voting rights. "Certainly, there is risk in getting rid of the filibuster, but there's risk if we let the status quo where nothing happens continue," said Democratic Senator John Hickenlooper. Manchin is the only Senate Democrat who has not cosponsored the "For the People Act," the party's flagship voting bill.
Persons: Elizabeth Warren, Charles P, Rettig, Tom Williams, Joe Biden's, John Hickenlooper, Steny Hoyer, Kyrsten Sinema, Joe Manchin, Sinema, Manchin, David Morgan, Doina, Makini Brice, Sonya Hepinstall Organizations: Internal Revenue, Senate, Washington , D.C, REUTERS, Democratic, Democrat, The Washington Post, Thomson Locations: Washington ,, REUTERS WASHINGTON, The
REUTERS/Evelyn Hockstein/File PhotoWASHINGTON, June 21 (Reuters) - When the U.S. Senate this week votes on a sweeping election-reform bill, Republican Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will play a role he relishes: Roadblock to the Democratic agenda. McConnell earned the nicknames "Grim Reaper" and "Dr. No" after establishing a long track record for blocking Democratic initiatives stretching back into President Barack Obama's second term. "Mitch has been nothing but 'no' for a long time," Democratic President Joe Biden told reporters last week, as he prepared to return from Europe. "Not true," replied McConnell, who says he wants Biden to stick to moderate policies. A compromise plan offered by moderate Democratic Senator Joe Manchin, which Democrats could advance as an alternative, is unlikely to fare any better.
Persons: Mitch McConnell, Evelyn Hockstein, McConnell, Barack Obama's, Mitch, Joe Biden, Biden, Donald Trump, Joe Manchin, Kamala Harris, Chuck Schumer, It's, Mike Braun, Kyrsten Sinema, Kevin Cramer, Biden agenda's, Dick Durbin, John Barrasso, David Morgan, Scott Malone, Jonathan Oatis Organizations: Republicans, U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, WASHINGTON, U.S . Senate, Republican, Democratic, Biden, Democrats, Kentucky Republican, Indiana Republican, Reuters, Illinois Democrat, Representatives, Senate Republican, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, Europe, COVID, Illinois
Trump endorses Murkowski challenger in 2022 Senate race
  + stars: | 2021-06-18 | by ( David Morgan | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.99   time to read: +2 min
Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, listens during a U.S. Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing in Washington, U.S., March 18, 2021. Tshibaka, the former state administration commissioner, launched her campaign in March with a vow to defeat Murkowski in the 2022 election and has already enlisted the help of former Trump advisers. "I am honored and grateful to have the support of the 45th President of the United States, Donald J. Trump," Tshibaka tweeted. Murkowski voted to convict Trump of inciting the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riot, in which his supporters attacked Congress in an effort to stop certification of the 2020 election. The Alaska Republican Party later censured Murkowski and pledged to recruit a challenger to oppose her.
Persons: Sen, Lisa Murkowski, Susan Walsh, Donald Trump, Kelly Tshibaka, Tshibaka, Murkowski, Trump, Trump's, Joe Biden's, Donald J, David Morgan, Andy Sullivan, Jonathan Oatis Organizations: U.S, Senate Health, Education, Labor, WASHINGTON, Trump, Republican, Tea Party, Republicans, Democratic, Congress, Alaska Republican Party, Thomson Locations: Alaska, Washington , U.S, Tshibaka, United States
U.S. Senate Republican rejects voting rights compromise
  + stars: | 2021-06-17 | by ( ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: 1 min
U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) talks to reporters following the Senate Republicans weekly policy lunch at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., June 15, 2021. REUTERS/Evelyn HocksteinWASHINGTON, June 17 (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday rejected a compromise proposal from Democratic Senator Joe Manchin on voting rights legislation. "Senate Democrats seem to have reached a so-called 'compromise' election takeover among themselves," McConnell said in a statement. "And it still retains S. 1’s rotten core: an assault on the fundamental idea that states, not the federal government, should decide how to run their own elections.”Reporting by David Morgan; Writing by Doina Chiacu;Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Mitch McConnell, Evelyn Hockstein WASHINGTON, Joe Manchin, McConnell, David Morgan, Doina Chiacu Organizations: Republicans, U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, U.S ., Democratic, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S
REUTERS/Joshua Roberts/File PhotoWASHINGTON, June 15 (Reuters) - Democrats in the U.S. Congress on Tuesday criticized a $1.2 trillion infrastructure proposal by a bipartisan group of Senate moderates as neglecting some of their key priorities, raising questions about the measure's fate. The Senate proposal, which emerged after negotiations between Biden and Republican Senator Shelley Moore Capito collapsed last week, insufficiently addresses climate change and other Democratic goals, including spending on healthcare and childcare, Democrats said. The $1.2 trillion package, to span eight years, is below Biden's most recent proposal of $1.7 trillion. The two parties also disagree about how to pay for infrastructure and have not yet released details of how the money would be spent. "I think we should go bigger," said Richard Neal, chairman of the House's powerful Ways and Means Committee.
Persons: Joshua Roberts, Joe Biden's, Shelley Moore Capito, Richard Neal, Pramila Jayapal, Kamala Harris, Mitt Romney, Bernie Sanders, Chuck Schumer, Joe Manchin, Kirsten Sinema, Manchin, Bob Casey, Alexandria Ocasio, John Yarmuth, Makini Brice, Susan Cornwell, David Morgan, Scott Malone, Jonathan Oatis Organizations: U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, WASHINGTON, Congress, Democratic, Senate, Biden, Republicans, White, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, Cortez
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Republicans are due to hear details on Tuesday about a bipartisan proposal to revitalize America’s roads and bridges, which lawmakers believe could win support from the caucus as a part of President Joe Biden’s sweeping infrastructure plan. REUTERS/Evelyn HocksteinMembers of a bipartisan Senate group will discuss the proposal with Republican senators at their weekly policy lunch, Republican lawmakers and aides said on Monday evening. 2 Republican, told reporters that he expects Republican support for the proposal. But I think there would be substantial Republican support,” he said. “It’s my understanding that everybody has said that they could support reconciliation in some form.
Persons: Joe Biden’s, Bill Cassidy, Evelyn Hockstein, “ We’ll, , Shelley Moore Capito, Biden, John Thune, , , Dick Durbin, eyeing, Nancy Pelosi, Mark Warner, Capito, ” Warner, Warner, Joe Manchin, Jeanne Shaheen Organizations: WASHINGTON, U.S, Senate Republicans, Senate, Capitol, REUTERS, Republican, Democrat, Washington Post Locations: America’s, Washington , U.S
In fact, no, I don't think either party, if it were different from the president, would confirm a Supreme Court nominee in the middle of an election," McConnell told syndicated conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt. But the senator signaled that a Biden nominee could have problems even outside an election year. "Mitch McConnell is already foreshadowing that he'll steal a 3rd Supreme Court seat if he gets the chance. We need to expand the Supreme Court," Democratic Senator Ed Markey said on Twitter. Jackson, among the most prominent Black women in the federal judiciary, is considered a potential Supreme Court pick for Biden.
Persons: Mitch McConnell, ERIN SCOTT, Joe Biden, McConnell, Hugh Hewitt, Barack Obama, Antonin Scalia, Hewitt, Merrick Garland, Donald Trump, Neil Gorsuch, Amy Coney Barrett, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Trump, Biden, Brett Kavanaugh, McConnell's, Ed Markey, Stephen Breyer, Ketanji Brown Jackson, Jackson, Kamala Harris Organizations: Capitol, REUTERS, Democratic, Biden, Republican, Obama's, Democrat, Supreme, Twitter, Washington, District Locations: Washington , U.S
Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell also told the group his was open to their ideas, Republicans said. Schumer said work was still progressing on two tracks - one a bipartisan infrastructure bill and the other a measure that if brought to the floor, could pass with only Democratic votes through a maneuver called reconciliation that bypasses the rule requiring 60 votes for bills to advance. Biden and Schumer have talked about such a two-track approach“I was told verbally, stuff, I’ve asked for paper, I’ll look at it,” Schumer said. He and Democratic Senator Jon Tester also spoke of a provision that might raise revenue by having the Internal Revenue Service go after tax cheats. In the latest bipartisan discussions, Republican lawmakers said the group reached tentative conclusions on specific spending provisions that it would pay for without raising taxes.
Persons: Chuck Schumer, Mitch McConnell, Evelyn Hockstein, Joe Biden's, Biden, Shelley Moore Capito, Schumer, I’ve, ” Schumer, Susan Collins, McConnell, , Joe Manchin, Mitt Romney, Jon Tester, Kate Bedingfield, White, , we’re, Chris Murphy, ” Murphy Organizations: WASHINGTON, Democratic U.S, U.S, Senate, Capitol, REUTERS, Republican, Republicans, Democrats, Reuters, Democrat, Democratic, Internal Revenue, White House, CNN Locations: Washington , U.S
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -A bipartisan group of 10 U.S. senators said on Thursday it had reached agreement on a framework for a proposed infrastructure spending bill that would not include any tax increases. The senators said they were discussing their approach with their colleagues and the White House, and they were optimistic about getting broad support. “Our group ... has worked in good faith and reached a bipartisan agreement on a realistic, compromise framework to modernize our nation’s infrastructure and energy technologies,” the lawmakers said in a statement. Democratic U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said earlier on Thursday he was open to a bipartisan infrastructure bill but wanted to see it in writing. Republicans say Biden’s infrastructure plan puts too much money into addressing climate change and building up some social programs.
Persons: Chuck Schumer, Jonathan Ernst, unspent, Joe Biden’s, Biden, Shelley Moore Capito, Mitch McConnell, Schumer, MCCONNELL, Joe Manchin, Jeanne Shaheen, Kyrsten Sinema, Jon Tester, Mark Warner, Bill Cassidy, Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Rob Portman, Mitt Romney, Collins, McConnell, Romney, Tester, Kamala Harris Organizations: WASHINGTON, U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, White, Democratic U.S, Democrat, Republican, Reuters, Internal Revenue Locations: Washington , U.S
Republicans see progress in bipartisan U.S. infrastructure talks
  + stars: | 2021-06-10 | by ( David Morgan | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +5 min
REUTERS/Evelyn HocksteinRepublican members of a bipartisan group trying to forge a new deal to boost U.S. infrastructure reported some progress on Thursday after their Senate leader Mitch McConnell told them he was open to such a plan. said Republican Senator Bill Cassidy, one of the bipartisan negotiators. Republican Senator Mitt Romney said other Republicans had also been receptive: "We're talking to individuals one by one, and so far, folks have said they're open to what we're doing." Senator Joe Manchin, a centrist Democrat on the negotiating group, told reporters that "Things are going in the right direction." "Depends on how you talk about raising taxes," Senator Jeanne Shaheen replied.
Persons: Mitch McConnell, Evelyn Hockstein, Joe Biden's, Biden, Shelley Moore Capito, McConnell, Bill Cassidy, Susan Collins, Mitt Romney, Joe Manchin, Chris Murphy, Murphy, Romney, Jeanne Shaheen, nothing's, everything's, Chuck Schumer, Capito, Kate Bedingfield, White, we're, Cassidy Organizations: Republican, Capitol, REUTERS, Reuters, Democrat, Democratic, Republicans, White House, CNN, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S
Revamping America's infrastructure is a high priority for Biden, but his proposal has run into trouble in a Congress only narrowly controlled by his fellow Democrats, making Republican support pivotal. Republican Senator Mitt Romney told reporters that members of the group have reached "tentative conclusions" on their plan. Tester said he would be willing to look at funding an infrastructure plan without raising taxes. Romney and Portman said members of the group have not settled on a total amount of infrastructure spending and declined to discuss specific provisions they would pursue. The 10 senators now working on a new plan are part of a larger 20-member bipartisan group, known as the G-20, that includes Capito.
Persons: Mitt Romney, Evelyn Hockstein, Joe Biden, Biden, Romney, Republicans Romney, Rob Portman, Bill Cassidy, Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Kyrsten Sinema, Jon Tester, Joe Manchin, Mark Warner, Jeanne Shaheen, Portman, Donald Trump, Tester, it'll, Cassidy, Kamala Harris, Shelley Moore Capito, Capito Organizations: U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, Republican, Republicans, COVID, U.S . Treasury, Senate, Biden, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, U.S
Republican Senator Mitt Romney told reporters that members of the group have reached "tentative conclusions" on their plan. "We're not raising taxes," Romney told reporters. Cassidy, who spoke to Biden about infrastructure by phone on Tuesday, predicted that any plan containing tax hikes would not receive enough Republican support to pass the Senate. Romney and Portman said members of the group have not settled on a total amount of infrastructure spending and declined to discuss specific provisions they would pursue. The 10 senators now working on a new plan are part of a larger 20-member bipartisan group, known as the G-20, that includes Capito.
Persons: Mitt Romney, Evelyn Hockstein, Joe Biden, Biden, Romney, Jon Tester, Tester, Republicans Romney, Rob Portman, Bill Cassidy, Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Kyrsten Sinema, Joe Manchin, Mark Warner, Jeanne Shaheen, Portman, Cassidy, Donald Trump, Kamala Harris, Shelley Moore Capito, Capito Organizations: U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, Republican, Democratic, Biden's Democratic Party, Republicans, Biden, Romney, COVID, U.S . Treasury, Louisiana Republican, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, U.S
A Democratic member of the group, Senator Jon Tester, said he would be willing to look at funding an infrastructure plan without raising taxes though he was not committed to that approach. Cassidy, who spoke to Biden about infrastructure by phone on Tuesday, predicted that any plan containing tax hikes would not receive enough Republican support to pass the Senate. Republicans have shown no appetite for tax increases, having strongly backed a 2017 tax cut law signed by former President Donald Trump. Separately, a bipartisan group of 58 House lawmakers led by Representatives Josh Gottheimer and Brian Fitzpatrick known as the Problem Solvers Caucus released a $1.2 trillion infrastructure framework. The caucus has been working with the bipartisan group of senators, a source familiar with the negotiations said.
Persons: Mitt Romney, Evelyn Hockstein, Joe Biden's, Biden, Romney, Jon Tester, Tester, Rob Portman, Bill Cassidy, Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Kyrsten Sinema, Joe Manchin, Mark Warner, Jeanne Shaheen, Sherrod Brown, Brown, you'd, it's, Cassidy, Kamala Harris, Donald Trump, Portman, Shelley Moore Capito, Josh Gottheimer, Brian Fitzpatrick Organizations: U.S, Capitol, REUTERS, Democratic, Banking, Biden, Republicans, COVID, U.S . Treasury, Republican, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, U.S
Republican infrastructure negotiator sees no quick deal with Biden
  + stars: | 2021-06-08 | by ( David Morgan | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +3 min
U.S. President Joe Biden gestures toward Senator Shelley Capito (R-WV) during an infrastructure meeting with Republican Senators at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 13, 2021. "I don't think we'll come to an agreement today, but I still believe that there's a deal to be had here. She rejected the idea that her next round of talks with Biden could be make-or-break for a bipartisan package. One of those lawmakers, Republican Senator Bill Cassidy, told reporters that his group's plan could come to the foreground if talks between Capito and Biden failed. "We're nailing down exactly where we are," Republican Senator Mitt Romney, another member of the bipartisan group, told reporters.
Persons: Joe Biden, Shelley Capito, Kevin Lamarque, Shelley Moore Capito, Biden, we're, Capito, Roger Wicker, Bill Cassidy, We're, Mitt Romney Organizations: Republican Senators, White, REUTERS, U.S, Senate Republican, Republican, Senate Environment, Public, Committee, White House, American Jobs, Twitter, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, Cornwall, England
REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/File PhotoPresident Joe Biden on Tuesday broke off talks on an infrastructure bill with a key Republican, instead reaching out to a bipartisan group, after one-on-one talks with Senator Shelley Capito were described as hitting a "brick wall." Biden changed course after Capito, the leader of a group of six Senate Republicans handling the negotiations, offered $330 billion in new spending on infrastructure, far short of Biden's reduced $1.7 trillion offer. A bipartisan group of senators was due to meet on Tuesday to discuss the next steps on infrastructure. Biden also reached out to Cassidy on Tuesday to discuss infrastructure, the Republican said. Any infrastructure package should and must be bipartisan."
Persons: Joe Biden, Shelley Capito, Kevin Lamarque, Biden, Capito, Jen Psaki, Psaki, Chuck Schumer, Schumer, Bill Cassidy, Mitt Romney, Rob Portman, Sinema, Joe Manchin, whittle, Cassidy, POTUS Organizations: Republican Senators, White, REUTERS, Republicans, Republican, Democratic, American Jobs, Twitter, Administration, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, Louisiana, Cornwall, England
President Joe Biden on Tuesday broke off talks on an infrastructure bill with a key Republican, instead reaching out to a bipartisan group, after one-on-one talks with Senator Shelley Capito were described as hitting a "brick wall." Biden changed course after Capito, the leader of a group of six Senate Republicans handling the negotiations, offered $330 billion in new spending on infrastructure, far short of Biden's reduced $1.7 trillion offer. Earlier in the day, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said the talks "seem to be running into a brick wall." A bipartisan group of senators met on Tuesday to discuss the next steps on infrastructure. Any infrastructure package should and must be bipartisan."
Persons: Joe Biden, Shelley Capito, Biden, Capito, Jen Psaki, Psaki, Chuck Schumer, Schumer, Bill Cassidy, Mitt Romney, Rob Portman, Sinema, Joe Manchin, Kevin Lamarque, Romney, whittle, Cassidy, POTUS Organizations: Republicans, Republican, Democratic, Republican Senators, White, REUTERS, American Jobs, Twitter, Administration, Thomson Locations: Washington , U.S, Louisiana, Cornwall, England
U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen speaks during a news conference, after attending the G7 finance ministers meeting, at Winfield House in London, Britain June 5, 2021. "It's wrong for the United States," Republican Senator John Barrasso said of the tax deal struck on Saturday by finance ministers from the G7 wealthy democracies. In exchange, G7 countries agreed to end digital services taxes, but the timing for that is dependent on the new rules being implemented. TREATY OR NOTDaniel Bunn, an international tax expert at the Tax Foundation, a right-leaning think tank in Washington, said he believed that establishing new taxing rights on 100 multinational firms would require a new tax treaty. Manal Corwin, head of KPMG's Washington National Tax Practice and a former U.S. Treasury official, said Yellen's G7 deal could be done through legislation that overrides existing bilateral tax treaties - using a simple majority as part of budget reconciliation procedures.
Persons: Janet Yellen, Justin Tallis, Janet Yellen’s, Joe Biden, John Barrasso, Barrasso, Yellen, Pat Toomey, Toomey, Daniel Bunn, Manal Corwin, Kamala Harris, Ron Wyden, Wyden, that’s, Organizations: Treasury, Winfield House, REUTERS, U.S, Senate Republicans, Monday, Democratic, Republican, Republican Conference, U.S . Capitol, Google, Facebook Inc, Amazon.com Inc, Apple Inc, U.S . Treasury, Fox Business Network, Tax Foundation, Constitution, Congress, KPMG's, Tax, Finance, Thomson Locations: London, Britain, U.S, Washington, United States, KPMG's Washington
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