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Biden Administration Lays Out Broad Strategy for Targeting Domestic Terrorism
  + stars: | 2021-06-15 | by ( Rachael Levy | ) www.wsj.com sentiment -0.98   time to read: +2 min
The Biden administration is seeking increased funds for the Justice Department and Federal Bureau of Investigation and promoting programs for civic education and digital literacy to counter a rise in domestic terrorism, according to a broad new strategy released Tuesday morning. The 32-page policy, developed during a monthslong review, presents a governmentwide approach to President Biden’s campaign promise to reduce attacks by domestic extremists. It includes several actions already under way, such as increased funding for state and local programs to combat domestic violent extremism. In March, U.S. intelligence agencies found that white supremacists and antigovernment militia extremists pose the most lethal threat among domestic violent extremists, echoing findings from DHS and testimony last year by FBI Director Christopher Wray. The White House’s plans don’t address whether the U.S. should make domestic terrorism a federal crime, leaving that question to Congress and the Justice Department.
Persons: Biden, Biden’s, Christopher Wray Organizations: Justice Department, Federal Bureau of Investigation, National Security Council, Center for Strategic, International Studies, Department of Homeland Security, DHS, CSIS Locations: Washington, U.S
But when Sawyer tried to call her last month with the good news that she would be allowed into the United States, she couldn’t reach her – Jasibi had been kidnapped again. Biden has filled many key immigration advisory positions with high-profile migrant advocates, including some opponents of the Title 42 border restrictions. Since Biden took office, U.S. border authorities have recorded more than 300,000 expulsions under Title 42. U.S. officials have said the Title 42 border restrictions are partly needed to protect government workers. In recent weeks the United States began admitting asylum seekers whom migrant advocates had identified as being especially vulnerable in Mexico.
Persons: Jasibi, Callaghan O'Hare, Joe Biden, Ariana Sawyer, Sawyer, Biden, Andrea Flores, Flores, Donald Trump, ” Flores, , Joseph Amon, Del Organizations: WASHINGTON, REUTERS, Trump, Reuters, Human Rights Watch, Publicly, Biden, American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU, National Security Council, U.S, Department of Health, Human Services, Central Americans, U.S . Centers for Disease Control, Prevention, Drexel University, CDC, DHS, United, Human Rights Locations: Honduras, Texas, U.S, United States, Mexico, Jasibi, Honduran, Del Rio , Texas, Ciudad Acuna, Del Rio
Special operations and cyberwarfareUS Army cyberspace operations specialists at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin in California, January 13, 2019. For Special Operations Command and Joint Special Operations Command, that investment is reflected in the National Defense Authorization Act, an annual bill that funds defense and national-security programs. "Why not send special operations out with commercial, off-the-shelf tools that can help us understand what the environment is out there?" Information gathered through cyber operations can also be used to improve US training of foreign partner forces. Conversely, Cyber Command is more interested in knowing where an adversary's communications networks are and how to take them out.
Persons: cyberattacks, Jens Stoltenberg, Elizabeth, Steven Stover, Jessica Hines, Hasken, cryptologist, Command —, Renae Pittman, JIM WATSON Organizations: Colonial Pipeline, NATO, Royal Navy, Tallinn Accords, National Training Center, Fort, US Army, Pentagon, Intelligence, Cyber Command, Command —, American, ISIS, US, MarkPoint Technologies, Command, Operations Command, National Defense, Air Force Special, Kunsan Air Base, US Air Force, Special, Operations, Army Special Forces, Civil Affairs, Psychological, US Air Forces, Europe Regional Training Center, Ramstein Air Base, Infrastructure Security Agency, Government, Getty, Companies, SMU, NSA, FBI, DHS, Signature Management Locations: Colonial Pipeline ., York, Russia, China, Geneva, Tallinn, Fort Irwin, California, South Korea, Asia, Europe, Germany, Annapolis , Maryland
A total of 3,913 migrant children were separated by the Trump administration, DHS said Tuesday. More than half of the nearly 4,000 children separated from their families by the Trump administration remain estranged from their parents, the Department of Homeland Security revealed in a new report on Tuesday. Still, as DHS's Inspector General said in a May report, some 348 parents and children were separated against their apparent wishes. The task force, created by an executive order from President Joe Biden, identified 3,913 children as having been separated from their parents during the last administration. Comunidad Maya Pixan Ixim, a nonprofit representing the Maya community in Nebraska, said it has been consulting with the DHS task force.
Persons: Trump, Joe Biden, General, Lee Gelernt, Gelernt, Pixan Ixim Organizations: DHS, Department of Homeland Security, Central, DHS's Interagency, Force, White, CBS News, KQED, American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU, Comunidad, Twitter Locations: United States, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nebraska, Americas
More than 2,100 children separated at the border by Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” program “have not yet been reunified” with their parents, according to the task force working to reunite the families. In a 22-page progress report submitted to President Joe Biden last week, the task force indicated that 2,127 children are awaiting their reunions. Only seven children have rejoined their families since Biden took office earlier this year. "The Biden administration says 1,786 children have “already been reunified with their parent,” most as a result of a court order during the Trump administration, a number the ACLU says may already be higher. The report states that 3,913 children separated from their families between July 2017 and January 2021 have been identified.
Persons: Joe Biden, Biden, , Trump, Kamala Harris, Alejandro Mayorkas, , Lee Gelernt Organizations: Trump, DHS, Department of Homeland, ACLU, of Justice Locations: Guatemala, Mexico, United States
The failure to distribute the information widely, the report says, left rank-and-file Capitol Police officers unprepared to defend themselves from the armed mob. The 100-page Senate report, the results so far of a joint investigation by the Homeland Security and Rules committees, offers new details about what Capitol Police leaders knew and when they knew it. "The variations in Ms. Pittman's testimony reflect the lack of consensus about whether the available intelligence information contained specific threats," the report says. The email also noted a "huge uptick with reporting via open source of the groups' intentions of forming a perimeter around the campus," the Senate report says. Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.
Persons: Lev Radin, National Guardsmen didn't, Yogananda Pittman, Pittman, Stephen Sund, Donald Trump, George Floyd, Robert Contee, , They're, Trump, John Minchillo Organizations: WASHINGTON —, WASHINGTON — U.S . Capitol Police, Trump, Capitol Police, Capitol, U.S, Pacific Press, Getty, NBC, Homeland Security, National Guard, D.C, National Guardsmen, Republican, FBI, Justice Department, Department of Homeland Security, DHS, Electoral, Intelligence Community, Congress, Secret Service, Metropolitan Police, U.S . Capitol, Pentagon, Washington Police, Democratic, NBC News, Capitol Police Labor Committee Locations: WASHINGTON, WASHINGTON — U.S, Washington, Norfolk , Virginia
Biden issued an executive order shortly after taking office that established a task force to reunify children separated from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border under former President Donald Trump, calling such separations a "human tragedy." The Biden task force, using information from advocates and ongoing litigation, has identified roughly 3,900 children separated from parents at the border and 1,700 cases that remain under review, the report said. Of the 3,900 separated children identified, nearly 1,800 have been reunified with a parent. Nearly all of those reunifications happened before the creation of the task force, the report said. While the overall number of children still separated from their parents is unknown, the report estimates it could be over 2,000.
Persons: Chanel, Adriana, Adrees Latif, Joe Biden, Biden, Donald Trump, Trump, Government watchdogs Organizations: REUTERS, U.S, U.S . Department of Homeland Security, Government, DHS, Thomson Locations: Honduras, U.S, Rio Grande, United States, Mexico, La Joya , Texas
U.S. formally ends Trump’s ‘remain in Mexico’ asylum policy
  + stars: | 2021-06-01 | by ( Ted Hesson | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: +1 min
Migrants who traveled to northern Mexico seeking asylum in the United States, are pictured at a migrant encampment in Matamoros, Mexico February 18, 2021. REUTERS/Daniel Becerril/File PhotoThe United States has formally ended the Trump-era “remain in Mexico” policy, which forced tens of thousands of Central American asylum-seekers to wait in Mexico for U.S. court cases, according to a U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) memo sent to agency leaders on Tuesday. Since then, more than 11,000 migrants enrolled in it have been allowed to enter the United States to pursue asylum claims, a DHS official told Reuters on Tuesday. Republicans have criticized Biden's actions, including ending the MPP program, saying he encouraged an increase in migrant arrivals at the U.S.-Mexico border in recent months. In a Feb. 2 executive order, Biden called for U.S. agencies to review the MPP program and consider whether to terminate it.
Persons: Daniel Becerril, Joe Biden, Biden, Donald Trump, Trump, Alejandro Mayorkas, ” Mayorkas Organizations: REUTERS, Trump, Central, U.S . Department of Homeland Security, DHS, Reuters, Democrat Locations: Mexico, United States, Matamoros , Mexico, States, Central American, U.S
Monday will mark 100 years since the Tulsa race massacre destroyed "Black Wall Street." White supremacists could target the commemorative events in racially charged attacks, the DHS warned. Monday will mark 100 years since the Tulsa race massacre destroyed "Black Wall Street," and the US Department of Homeland Security has warned that white supremacist groups might target events commemorating it. The Tulsa race massacre saw mobs of white residents attack Black residents and businesses in the Greenwood District of Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1921. The massacre destroyed more than 35 square blocks of the wealthiest Black community in the US, CNBC said.
Persons: Joe Biden, White, Wendell Franklin, Franklin, John Legend, Stacey Abrams Organizations: DHS, US Department of Homeland Security, NBC News, Tulsa Police, Department of Homeland Security, Oklahoma's, Greenwood District of, Britannica, CNBC, Oklahoma Historical Society Locations: Tulsa, Oklahoma, Greenwood, Greenwood District of Tulsa , Oklahoma
The Department of Homeland Security is "taking a very close look" at vaccine passports for Americans traveling abroad, Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas told ABC's "Good Morning America" on Friday. He then added that, "There’s an underlying point here, of course, which is everyone should get vaccinated." The concept of "vaccine passports" has been the subject of conservative backlash in the United States, with numerous states having already acted to curtail or ban documentation of Covid-19 vaccinations. “We’ve always said we’re looking at how we can ensure Americans traveling abroad have a quick and easy way to enter other countries. "There will be no federal vaccinations database and no federal mandate requiring everyone to obtain a single vaccination credential.”
Persons: Alejandro Mayorkas, ABC's, Mayorkas, Ronald, Stefani Reynold, they've, “ We’ve, Organizations: of Homeland Security, Ronald Reagan National Airport, Bloomberg, Getty, European Union, DHS, NBC News Locations: U.S, United States, Arlington , Va
The Department of Homeland Security has issued the first cybersecurity regulation for the pipeline sector. While Colonial was able to restart operations within five days, it had already become one of the most impactful cyberattacks in American history. While DHS’ Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency provides guidance to U.S. companies that handle the country’s infrastructure, there are few federal government requirements for them to have even basic cybersecurity measures in place. Under the new regulation, roughly 100 pipeline companies will be required to keep a cybersecurity coordinator on call at all times, and to report any incident to the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency within 12 hours. Thursday’s regulation was only the first of several new initiatives for the pipeline sector, another official said on the press call.
Persons: Biden, Joseph Blount, Bryson Bort Organizations: of Homeland Security, Colonial Pipeline, Colonial, United, Wall Street Journal, DHS, Infrastructure Security Agency, ICS Locations: United States
Pipeline operators now required to report cybersecurity threats to DHS
  + stars: | 2021-05-27 | by ( ) www.cnbc.com sentiment -0.96   time to read: 1 min
Share Share Article via Facebook Share Article via Twitter Share Article via LinkedIn Share Article via EmailPipeline operators now required to report cybersecurity threats to DHSCNBC’s Eamon Javers joins ‘The News with Shepard Smith’ to discuss the DHS Pipeline and how operators are now required to report cybersecurity threats to them within 12 hours and fix issues within 30 days. About 100 companies will be affected by these rules.
Persons: Eamon Javers, Shepard Smith Organizations: Pipeline, DHS Pipeline
Colonial Pipeline Missed Requested Security Review Before Hack
  + stars: | 2021-05-26 | by ( David Uberti | ) www.wsj.com + 0.00   time to read: +5 min
Colonial Pipeline Co. last year didn’t undergo a requested federal security review of its facilities and was in the process of scheduling a separate audit of its computer networks when hackers hit on May 7. A Colonial spokesman said the company offered to undergo a virtual review of its facilities, rather than a typical in-person audit, when TSA officials requested the security check last year. Newsletter Sign-up WSJ Pro Cybersecurity Cybersecurity news, analysis and insights from WSJ's global team of reporters and editors. The Colonial spokesman said the TSA in 2018 completed security assessments that included three facility reviews and an audit of its security policies. That has hampered pipeline security oversight, the watchdog said, adding that the TSA reviewed corporate security policies of fewer than 10 of the country’s 100 most critical pipeline systems annually from 2013 to 2017.
Persons: , , didn’t, Joseph Blount, Biden, David Uberti Organizations: Colonial Pipeline Co, of Homeland Security, Transportation Security Administration, DHS, Colonial, TSA, U.S . House Homeland Security, Wall, Street, Infrastructure Security Agency, , “ TSA Locations: East, East Coast, U.S
TSA to Require Pipeline Operators to Notify It of Cyberattacks
  + stars: | 2021-05-25 | by ( Rebecca Smith | ) www.wsj.com sentiment -0.73   time to read: +1 min
The Transportation Security Administration intends to release the first of at least two security directives that would require pipeline operators to notify it when they are targets or victims of cyberattacks, according to senior officials at the Department of Homeland Security. The action, expected this week, also will require each company to designate a point person for cybersecurity. The order “should be understood as step one” in a detailed program by the Biden administration to boost the security of more than 2.5 million miles of U.S. pipelines, said one of the DHS officials. “Step two will be a more muscular mandate,” in coming weeks, that will require pipeline owners to take concrete steps to secure their assets against attacks, the official said. The action by TSA, which is part of DHS, provides the first solid evidence that the Biden administration intends to insert itself into pipeline security more directly than the Trump, Obama and Bush administrations, which deferred to the pipeline industry’s desire to avoid regulations for physical- and cybersecurity.
Persons: Biden, Trump, Bush Organizations: Transportation Security Administration, Department of Homeland Security, DHS, TSA, Obama, Colonial Pipeline Co Locations: U.S
After Colonial Pipeline Hack, U.S. to Require Operators to Report Cyberattacks
  + stars: | 2021-05-25 | by ( Rebecca Smith | ) www.wsj.com sentiment -0.73   time to read: +1 min
The Transportation Security Administration intends to release the first of at least two security directives that would require pipeline operators to notify it when they are targets or victims of cyberattacks, according to senior officials at the Department of Homeland Security. The action, expected this week, also will require each company to designate a point person for cybersecurity. The order “should be understood as step one” in a detailed program by the Biden administration to boost the security of more than 2.5 million miles of U.S. pipelines, said one of the DHS officials. “Step two will be a more muscular mandate,” in coming weeks, that will require pipeline owners to take concrete steps to secure their assets against attacks, the official said. The action by TSA, which is part of DHS, provides the first solid evidence that the Biden administration intends to insert itself into pipeline security more directly than the Trump, Obama and Bush administrations, which deferred to the pipeline industry’s desire to avoid regulations for physical- and cybersecurity.
Persons: Biden, Trump, Bush Organizations: Transportation Security Administration, Department of Homeland Security, DHS, TSA, Obama, Colonial Pipeline Co Locations: U.S
The Department of Homeland Security will require pipeline companies to report cyber attacks. The Colonial Pipeline hack highlighted the country's need to safeguard its defense against cyber threats. US officials will introduce the country's first pipeline cybersecurity regulations after hackers attacked the country's largest oil pipeline earlier this month, causing a massive outage, The Washington Post reported Tuesday. The new rules may also require companies to appoint a cyber official to have around-the-clock contact with federal authorities. As the Post notes, DHS has historically issued only voluntary guidance on cyber safety, but these new rules will be mandatory.
Persons: Organizations: of Homeland Security, Washington Post, Department of Homeland Security, Transportation Security Administration, DHS, TSA, Infrastructure Security Agency, Colonial Pipeline, FBI
The Biden administration is extending temporary protection status (TPS) for Haitian immigrants. The move reverses a Trump administration effort that sought to end the special consideration. The Biden administration is allowing eligible Haitian nationals residing in the US to apply for a new 18-month designation for temporary protected status, reversing a Trump administration effort that had sought to end the special consideration. The designation was extended several times until the Trump administration announced in January 2018 that Haiti's TPS designation would end effective July 22, 2019. Current beneficiaries under Haiti's TPS designation also must apply, the agency said.
Persons: Biden, Alejandro Mayorkas, Mayorkas, Trump, America's, Murad Awawdeh, Sen, Bob Menendez, Menendez Organizations: TPS, Homeland, DHS, US, New York Immigration Coalition, US Citizenship, Immigration Services Locations: Haiti, United States, Haitian, New York, New Jersey
US Customs officers speaks with people in a car beside a sign saying that the US border is closed at the US-Canada border in Lansdowne, Ontario, on March 22, 2020. The U.S. will continue to enforce coronavirus-related restrictions on nonessential travel across U.S. land borders through June 21, the Biden administration announced on Thursday. "We're working closely with Canada & Mexico to safely ease restrictions as conditions improve," the Department of Homeland Security said on Twitter. Essential trade and travel will still be permitted, the DHS tweeted. It was unclear from the DHS tweet if the agency anticipated easing those restrictions immediately after June 21, or if it would merely reassess the need for those limits at that time.
Persons: Biden Organizations: Department of Homeland Security, Twitter, DHS Locations: Canada, Lansdowne , Ontario, U.S, Mexico
ICE will cut ties with two immigration detention centers, officials announced Thursday. The Biden administration will close two Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention centers — one in Georgia and one in Massachusetts — that came under federal investigation for allegations of mistreatment of immigrants, officials said Thursday. Last fall, a whistleblower who had previously worked at the Irwin Detention Center in Ocilla, Georgia, alleged medical neglect against the institution in a complaint filed to the Homeland Security inspector general. Those who remain will be transferred out of the facilities, as the administration plans to take a different approach to immigration detention, according to CNN. Bristol County Sheriff Thomas Hodgson, an outspoken Trump supporter, responded to the order with disdain.
Persons: Biden, Alejandro Mayorkas, Carlos Carreiro, Irwin, Mayorkas, Tae Johnson, Carol Rose, Bristol County Sheriff Thomas Hodgson, Trump Organizations: Department of Homeland, ICE, Detention, Carlos Carreiro Immigration Detention, Bristol, Sheriff's, Irwin Detention, Homeland, NBC News, DHS, Washington Post, CNN, The Post, American Civil Liberties Union, Massachusetts, Bristol County Sheriff, of Homeland, Immigration, Customs Enforcement Locations: Georgia, Massachusetts, Massachusetts —, Irwin, Bristol County , Massachusetts, Ocilla , Georgia, Bristol, Bristol County
“Violent extremists may seek to exploit the easing of Covid-19-related restrictions across the United States to conduct attacks against a broader range of targets after previous public capacity limits reduced opportunities for lethal attacks,” the bulletin said. A senior DHS official said the bulletin is “not linked to a specific credible threat” but is being shared to inform the public about threats and ways they can report suspicious activity. Other named threats included the targeting of government buildings, houses of worship and commercial facilities by domestic violent extremists. The bulletin warned about ideologically motivated violent extremists who are “fueled by perceived grievances, false narratives and conspiracy theories” and spread false information online to incite violence. It also warned about foreign terrorist organizations who may seek to recruit Americans to their causes.
Persons: WASHINGTON, Biden, Alejandro Mayorkas Organizations: The Department of Homeland Security, Terrorism, Capitol, DHS Locations: United States, Russia, China, Iran
Google is leading an effort to maintain work authorization for tens of thousands of people whose spouses hold H-1B visas, the high-skilled visa that's common in the tech industry. They wrote that 90,000 H-4 visa-holders would be impacted, 90% of whom are women. Tech companies that signed onto the amicus brief include Adobe, Amazon, Apple, Electronic Arts, eBay, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, PayPal, Reddit, StubHub and Twitter. Many work in highly skilled fields, with two-thirds of employed H-4 visa-holders working a science, technology and mathematics job, the companies wrote. WATCH: Here's how banning work visas impacts the U.S. economy
Persons: Sundar Pichai Organizations: U.S . House of Representatives Energy, Commerce, Google, Companies, Jobs, . Department of Homeland Security, DHS, Tech, Electronic Arts, eBay, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, PayPal, Twitter, Southern California Edison, CNBC, YouTube Locations: Washington
WASHINGTON — The successful hack of America's largest gas pipeline has exposed gaping holes in U.S. cyber defenses, experts say. Criminal hackers like the ones the FBI says attacked Colonial Pipeline are given overseas sanctuary by hostile foreign governments, out of reach of American law enforcement. The National Security Agency collects intelligence about cyberattacks, the FBI investigates them after they happen and the Department of Homeland Security tries to protect government computers. But no federal agency is in charge of defending the American public against hackers, be they criminals or intelligence operatives. Kelvin Coleman, executive director of the nonprofit National Cyber Security Alliance, had a different take.
Persons: WASHINGTON, Glenn Gerstell, Brandon Wales, Sen, Rob Portman, Portman, Joe Biden, It's, Gary Kinghorn, Biden, Dmitri Alperovitch, Eric Cole, Kelvin Coleman, I'm Organizations: Colonial, National Security Agency, FBI, Department of Homeland Security, American, North Korean, NSA, Infrastructure Security Agency, DHS, Colonial Pipeline, Homeland Security, Democratic National Committee, NBC, The New York Times, Tempered Networks, Silverado, National Cyber Security Alliance Locations: Russia, U.S, Colonial, Ohio, America
WASHINGTON — The Department of Homeland Security has begun implementing a strategy to gather and analyze intelligence about security threats from public social media posts, DHS officials said. They said DHS officials have been consulting with social media companies, private companies and nonprofit groups that analyze open-source social media data. DHS officials say that the counterterrorism case for analyzing social media is strong and that they believe social media can be a useful predictor of threats. "We do not, as the FBI, simply patrol social media looking for problems," he said. In a sense, DHS will now do just that, officials said — patrol public social media looking for intelligence pointing to threats.
Persons: WASHINGTON, Sarah Peck, Tasos Katopodis, Hugh Handeyside, Handeyside, Oren Segal, Joe Biden, John Cohen, Cohen, John Godfrey, Derek Chauvin, George Floyd, Adam Schiff, Christopher Wray, Schiff, it's, Wray Organizations: The Department of Homeland Security, U.S, Capitol, DHS, Twitter, Facebook, Capitol Police, American Civil Liberties Union, White House, Extremism, Defamation, FBI, National Guard, House Homeland Security, State, Capitol . Former FBI, NBC News, Intelligence Locations: Washington, U.S, Russia, Iran, Minneapolis
Parts of Trump's baseless election fraud claims started in 2018, The Washington Post reported. Some of the claims originated with Texas businessman Russell Ramsland Jr. and his associates. Trump allies like Sydney Powell met with associates of Ramsland in 2019. The allegations and claims about voting systems and fraud made by Ramsland and ASOG were unsubstantiated and widely debunked by data security experts. Ramsland told the Post that ASOG did give Powell and Giuliani research but said they never spoke with Trump directly.
Persons: Russell Ramsland Jr, Trump, Sydney Powell, Ramsland, Donald Trump, they'd, Rudy Giuliani, Powell, Giuliani, ASOG, Hugo Chavez Organizations: Washington Post, Allied Security Operations Group, Service, Department of Homeland Security, DHS, Trump, Ramsland, Post, Dominion Voting Systems Locations: Texas, Trump, Venezuela
Alejandro Mayorkas spoke to MSNBC about families separated by the Trump administration. He said that the administration cannot guarantee a path to permanent residency for reunited families. Alejandro Mayorkas told MSNBC in an interview that the Biden administration cannot guarantee a path to permanent residency for families separated by the Trump administration. In March, Mayorkas said that the administration would "explore lawful pathways for them to remain in the United States," but did not elaborate. Earlier this week, the Biden administration's task force reunited four families who were separated by the Trump administration — out of more than 1,000.
Persons: Alejandro Mayorkas, Trump, Biden, Mayorkas Organizations: Department of Homeland, MSNBC, Biden Locations: United States
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