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Fed tiptoes towards the taper stage months before the curtain call
  + stars: | 2021-06-14 | by ( Ann Saphir | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +6 min
“I think it will start very, very cautiously,” he added, and Fed Chair Jerome Powell won’t be in any rush to conclude it. The risk of another “taper tantrum” - the market ruckus that erupted eight years ago when Fed policymakers first broached the notion of scaling back their bond-buying after the 2007-2008 financial crisis - appears remote this time. DIFFERENT ECONOMY, DIFFERENT FRAMEWORKCompared with the last time the Fed was contemplating reducing its bond purchases, the U.S. economy is arguably in better shape. But the Fed still seems less eager to ease up on the monetary policy gas pedal than it was eight years ago. In 2013, Fed policymakers aimed to complete the taper by the time unemployment had dropped to 7%.
Persons: Robin Brooks, , , Jerome Powell won’t, Powell, Alejandra Grindal, Ned Davis, Gregory Daco, Daco Organizations: Federal Reserve, Institute of International Finance, Fed, Ned, Ned Davis Research, Oxford Economics, Reuters, Wall Street Locations: Treasuries, U.S, York
That would represent a 12.5% cut in Treasury purchases but a 25% reduction in MBS purchases. More recently, though, some Fed policymakers have questioned the need to keep up with the MBS purchases, in particular, given the different role they have played in this crisis. And Kaplan, for one, has said he believes the Fed’s MBS purchases may be having the unintended side effect of fueling excesses. “Tapering faster with MBS is a way of leaning a little bit against what might be seen as risks in the housing market. By contrast, the Fed’s footprint in the Treasury market, at around 25%, is larger than during its previous asset purchase program.
Persons: Eric S, Rosengren, Keith Bedford, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, Ginnie Mae, Robert Kaplan, Eric Rosengren, Kaplan, Bill English, Organizations: Reuters, Federal, Federal Reserve Bank, Boston's, REUTERS, Fed, MBS, Treasury, Dallas Fed, Boston Fed, Yale School of Management, Deutsche Bank, Treasuries Locations: New York, Treasuries
U.S. household wealth jumps to record $136.9 trillion, Fed says
  + stars: | 2021-06-10 | by ( Ann Saphir | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +3 min
REUTERS/Gary Cameron/File PhotoU.S. household wealth jumped to a record $136.9 trillion at the end of March, a report from the Federal Reserve showed on Thursday, suggesting plenty of dry tinder for economic growth as the coronavirus pandemic recedes and the nation reopens. Rising equity markets drove the overall increase in wealth, adding $3.2 trillion to household assets in the first quarter. Rising real estate values added around $1 trillion, according to the U.S. central bank's latest quarterly report on household, business and government financial accounts. Overall U.S. household wealth rose $5 trillion from the fourth quarter. The report showed overall household debt rose in the first quarter at an annualized rate of 6.5% compared to a 6.2% rise in the fourth quarter, as home mortgage borrowing accelerated.
Persons: Abraham Lincoln, Gary Cameron, Donald Trump, Joe Biden's Organizations: Engraving, REUTERS, Federal, Thomson Locations: Washington, U.S
The questions about just what the post-pandemic economy will look like are myriad: How many people will return to jobs? Workers sidelined by a variety of issues, from health concerns to lack of childcare, have been given latitude on when to return to work through expanded unemployment benefits that pay some more than their former jobs. By July 10 half the states will have ended the extra unemployment benefits, and the program lapses nationwide on Sept. 4. “There is evidence of supply bottlenecks slowly easing...On the labor front, reduced virus fear, reduced benefits, better childcare, will draw people back.”And people seem primed to respond. After a year of lockdown, public parks are again hosting crowds, sports stadiums are filling, and restaurants are booked to the limit.
Persons: Tyson Herzog, , Gregory Daco, Damian Fagan Organizations: Major League Baseball, U.S . Federal, Porchlight, Companies, Workers, Oxford Economics Locations: California, Washington, Alameda
Average hourly earnings for workers in leisure and hospitality rose to $18.09 in May, the highest ever and up 5% from January alone, according to Labor Department data released Friday. Pay rose even faster for workers in non-manager roles, who saw earnings rise by 7.2% from January, far outpacing any other sector. Some Republicans and businesses struggling to find workers say generous unemployment benefits are slowing down the labor market recovery by making it easier for workers to stay home. Either way, any frictions caused by unemployment benefits may be resolved over the next several months as those benefits are reduced. About half of states are putting an early end to a $300 federal supplement to weekly unemployment benefits, winding them down as soon as June 12.
Persons: Ivan Pierre Aguirre Organizations: Reuters, REUTERS, Labor Department, Employment Locations: El Paso , Texas, U.S
Fed policy can not solve labor market 'puzzle,' Kaplan says
  + stars: | 2021-06-03 | by ( Reuters Staff | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: +1 min
FILE PHOTO: Dallas Federal Reserve Bank President Robert Kaplan speaks at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, U.S., October 11, 2019. REUTERS/Ann Saphir(Reuters) - Monetary policy can not do much to solve the labor market “puzzle” where employers are having difficultly finding workers even as millions of Americans remain unemployed, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas President Robert Kaplan said on Thursday, repeating his view the Fed should reduce its support for the economy “sooner rather than later.”“If you were in a person-to-person job, you need more inducement to come back to that job,” Kaplan said in a virtual event held by Rice University, adding the availability of pandemic unemployment benefits gives workers the option of waiting for a better job rather than taking what is on offer. That creates an imbalance between demand for and supply of labor which the Fed is ill-equipped to address. “When unemployment benefits run out, we’ll find a balance.”
Persons: Robert Kaplan, Ann Saphir, ” Kaplan, we’ll Organizations: Dallas Federal Reserve Bank, Commonwealth Club, REUTERS, Federal Reserve Bank, Dallas, Rice University Locations: San Francisco , U.S
Fed should talk about taking foot off policy pedal: Kaplan
  + stars: | 2021-06-03 | by ( Reuters Staff | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: +2 min
FILE PHOTO: Dallas Federal Reserve Bank President Robert Kaplan speaks at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco, U.S., October 11, 2019. Many of those who are out of work aren’t willing to return to jobs at their previous wages, Kaplan noted. The availability of an extra $300 weekly in pandemic unemployment benefits gives many workers the option of holding out for a better offer, he said, contributing to an imbalance between labor supply and demand. “When unemployment benefits run out, we’ll find a balance,” he said. This month about half of the U.S. states will end those benefits; the extra support will end for the other half in September.
Persons: Robert Kaplan, Ann Saphir, ” Kaplan, Kaplan, aren’t, we’ll, Organizations: Dallas Federal Reserve Bank, Commonwealth Club, REUTERS, Federal Reserve Bank, Dallas, U.S, Rice University, Locations: San Francisco , U.S, United States, U.S
Amid hiring troubles, rising prices, U.S. growth gains speed -Fed
  + stars: | 2021-06-02 | by ( Howard Schneider | Ann Saphir | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.99   time to read: +2 min
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. economic recovery accelerated in recent weeks even as a long list of supply chain troubles, hiring difficulties, and rising prices cascaded through the country, Federal Reserve officials said in their latest review of economic conditions. A Wendy's restaurant displays a "Now Hiring" sign in Tampa, Florida, U.S., June 1, 2021. “Looking forward, contacts anticipate facing cost increases and charging higher prices in coming months,” the Fed said. Fed officials say they will likely struggle for several months to get a clear read on an economy snapping back to life but hitting some speed bumps as it accelerates. Manufacturers have struggled to source some supplies, adding to cost pressures that the central bank expects will prove temporary.
Persons: Octavio Jones Growth Organizations: WASHINGTON, Federal, REUTERS, Fed, Manufacturers Locations: U.S, Tampa , Florida
“While we are far from our goals today, we are seeing welcome progress, and I expect to see further progress,” Brainard said in remarks prepared for delivery to the Economic Club of New York. But “jobs are down by between 8 and 10 million compared with the level we would have seen in the absence of the pandemic. And it will be important to see sustained progress on inflation,” not just a temporary jump. Another poor outcome won’t necessarily dim faith in the recovery, only emphasize how hard it is to restart a $20 trillion economy. While she said she would be “attentive” to signs of higher inflation, she cautioned also against “preemptive tightening” that could deprive people of jobs.
Persons: Lael Brainard, ” Brainard, , Brainard, Howard Schneider, Andrea Ricci Organizations: Fed, Economic, of New Locations: WASHINGTON, United States, of New York
REUTERS/Brian Snyder“While we are far from our goals today, we are seeing welcome progress, and I expect to see further progress,” Brainard told the Economic Club of New York. And it will be important to see sustained progress on inflation,” not just a temporary jump. Instead she said several times the Fed would remain “steady,” a subtle change that may signal an important shift. Remarks from other Fed policymakers in recent weeks have signaled the debate over tapering the Fed’s bond-buying is underway. Another poor outcome won’t necessarily dim faith in the recovery, only emphasize how hard it is to restart a $20 trillion economy.
Persons: Lael Brainard, John F, Brian Snyder “, ” Brainard, , Brainard, Michael Feroli, Feroli Organizations: WASHINGTON, Fed, Federal Reserve, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University in, REUTERS, Economic, of New, Locations: United States, Harvard University in Cambridge , Massachusetts, U.S, of New York
U.S. labor market worse than it appears, Fed paper suggests
  + stars: | 2021-06-01 | by ( Reuters Staff | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: +1 min
FILE PHOTO: San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President Mary Daly poses at the bank’s headquarters in San Francisco, California, U.S., July 16, 2019. REUTERS/Ann SaphirSAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - U.S. labor market signals are conflicting to an “unprecedented” degree, but those suggesting labor market slack should be given more weight than those pointing to tightness, according a paper published Monday by the San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank. The paper looked at 26 labor market measures that typically move in tandem and found that during the current recovery they are giving wildly divergent signals about the health of the job market. The job openings rate, for instance, suggests the job market is much tighter than the unemployment rate; the labor force participation rate points to much more slack than detected in the unemployment rate. “Overall, our findings reveal that the labor market situation is worse than some headline numbers suggest.”U.S. central bankers are debating how tight the U.S. labor market has become amid widespread reports from employers about hiring difficulties even as the economy still has 8 million fewer people working than before the pandemic.
Persons: Mary Daly, Ann Saphir, Organizations: Francisco Federal Reserve Bank, REUTERS, FRANCISCO, Reuters, San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank Locations: San Francisco , California, U.S
Fed's Kashkari: inflation to recede if women return to labor force
  + stars: | 2021-06-01 | by ( Reuters Staff | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: 1 min
June 1 (Reuters) - Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank President Neel Kashkari on Monday said that he expects inflation to recede as COVID-19 cases decline, schools reopen and special pandemic unemployment benefits expire, allowing more people, especially women, to return to the workforce. “Right now there’s a big debate happening in economic circles about, is the economy overheating with all of this fiscal stimulus, are these higher inflation readings here to stay or not,” Kashkari told CNN in an interview. “I don’t think they are here to stay because I believe we are going to bring women back into the labor force and workers who have been displaced, but if we fail to do that, then these high inflation readings would become a lot more concerning because then it would signal we are overheating the economy.” (Reporting by Ann Saphir; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)
Persons: Neel Kashkari, ” Kashkari, , Ann Saphir, Chizu Nomiyama Organizations: Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank, CNN Locations: Minneapolis
But it comes with forecasts for near-term growth that do not reflect the rapid improvement in the economy so far this year. By contrast, the Biden budget pegs growth this year at just 5.2%. Economists said the Biden projections likely factor in two systemic headwinds to a prolonged run of above-trend growth: The country is aging rapidly, and the workforce is not growing. At the same time, the Biden forecasts also imply the country will grow more productive, in part thanks to the budget’s investment proposals. Graphic: The Biden Budget,
Persons: Joe Biden’s, Joe Biden, Jill Biden, Ken Cedeno, Cecilia Rouse, Economists, , Julia Coronado, Coronado, Roberto Perli, , Biden, Trump Organizations: Reuters, Base, REUTERS, Professional, Federal Reserve, Biden, Economic, Fed, Trump, Cornerstone, Biden Budget Locations: Eustis, Hampton , Virginia, U.S
Summer's about to start in America. So is sticker shock
  + stars: | 2021-05-28 | by ( Ann Saphir | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +3 min
Slideshow ( 5 images )They will also encounter something new and less pleasant: rising prices. Reuters put together a “Memorial Day Weekend price index” to capture the rising cost of an imaginary basket of goods and services particular to the summer’s first long weekend, which this year is May 29-31. Lodging has similarly risen dramatically in recent months, but the price index tracking hotels, motels and Airbnbs, among others, is still about 5% below pre-pandemic. Meanwhile, as of April the price index for admission to sporting events was down 1% from the pre-pandemic level. A trim and a tattoo: The price index for haircuts and other personal services like manicures and pedicures is up about 6% since before the pandemic.
Persons: airfares Organizations: FRANCISCO, Reuters, of Labor Statistics doesn’t Locations: U.S, America
Summer’s about to start in America. So is sticker shock
  + stars: | 2021-05-28 | by ( Ann Saphir | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +3 min
They will also encounter something new and less pleasant: rising prices. Reuters put together a "Memorial Day Weekend price index" to capture the rising cost of an imaginary basket of goods and services particular to the summer's first long weekend, which this year is May 29-31. Lodging has similarly risen dramatically in recent months, but the price index tracking hotels, motels and Airbnbs, among others, is still about 5% below pre-pandemic. Meanwhile, as of April the price index for admission to sporting events was down 1% from the pre-pandemic level. A trim and a tattoo: The price index for haircuts and other personal services like manicures and pedicures is up about 6% since before the pandemic.
Persons: airfares Organizations: Reuters, of Labor Statistics doesn’t, Thomson Locations: U.S
But it comes with forecasts for near-term growth that do not reflect the rapid improvement in the economy so far this year. By contrast, the Biden budget pegs growth this year at just 5.2%. Economists said the Biden projections likely factor in two systemic headwinds to a prolonged run of above-trend growth: The country is aging rapidly, and the workforce is not growing. At the same time, the Biden forecasts also imply the country will grow more productive, in part thanks to the budget's investment proposals. Looking only at the overall growth rate alone misses the point, Coronado said.
Persons: Joe Biden, Jill Biden, Ken Cedeno, Joe Biden’s, Cecilia Rouse, Economists, Julia Coronado, Coronado, Roberto Perli, Biden, Trump Organizations: Base, REUTERS, Professional, Federal Reserve, Biden, Economic, Fed, Trump, Cornerstone, Thomson Locations: Eustis, Hampton , Virginia, U.S
Summer’s about to start in America. So is sticker shock.
  + stars: | 2021-05-28 | by ( Ann Saphir | ) www.reuters.com + 0.00   time to read: +4 min
They will also encounter something new and less pleasant: rising prices. Reuters put together a "Memorial Day Weekend price index" to capture the rising cost of an imaginary basket of things and indulgences redolent of the summer's first long weekend, which this year is May 29-31. Lodging has similarly risen dramatically in recent months, but the price index tracking hotels, motels and Airbnbs, among others, is still about 5% below pre-pandemic. Meanwhile, as of April the price index for admission to sporting events was down 1% from the pre-pandemic level. A trim and a tattoo: The price index for haircuts and other personal services like manicures and pedicures is up about 6% since before the pandemic.
Persons: airfares Organizations: University of Michigan, Reuters, of Labor Statistics doesn’t, Thomson
Fed's Quarles sketches out potential components of crypto review
  + stars: | 2021-05-26 | by ( Jonnelle Marte | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.64   time to read: +2 min
May 26 (Reuters) - A top Federal Reserve official on Wednesday laid out some of the major questions U.S. financial regulators will need to tackle as they figure out how to best monitor the rapidly changing cryptocurrency landscape. “There is enough that has happened that we can in a relatively short space of time come up with some joint views,” said Quarles. His comments come a day after he said the Fed, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and other regulators were in a “sprint” to develop a framework for monitoring digital currencies. “A predominance of private monies may introduce consumer protection and financial stability risks because of their potential volatility and the risk of run-like behavior,” she said. (Reporting by Jonnelle Marte; Additional reporting by Howard Schneider and Ann Saphir; Editing by Sam Holmes)
Persons: Randal Quarles, , Quarles, ” Quarles, Jerome Powell, Lael Brainard, Jonnelle Marte, Howard Schneider, Ann Saphir, Sam Holmes Organizations: Federal, Fed, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Brookings Institution Locations: U.S
REUTERS/Erin Scott“I don’t want to overstate my concern,” the Fed’s vice chair for supervision, Randal Quarles, said at a Brookings Institution event. Quarles is the highest-ranking Fed official to begin making that case. The Fed wants investors to anticipate its plans for the bond purchases to avoid any sharp adjustment in markets and rates when it begins. The risk comes if the Fed is wrong, and Quarles laid out why he feels coming inflation may prove more persistent. Fed officials hope these circumstances will clear soon, with inflation easing and employment rebounding in ways that allow for a smooth, well-telegraphed transition to post-crisis policies.
Persons: Randal K, Quarles, Erin Scott “, Randal Quarles, , , Jerome Powell, ” Quarles, Tim Duy, Powell Organizations: Reuters, Federal Reserve, of Governors, Banking, Housing, Urban Affairs, Financial Regulators, REUTERS, Fed, University of Oregon Locations: U.S, Washington , U.S, Jackson Hole , Wyoming
Fed's Quarles signals open to talks on bond program
  + stars: | 2021-05-26 | by ( Ann Saphir | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.97   time to read: +2 min
“I don’t want to overstate my concern,” Fed vice chair for supervision Randal Quarles said in remarks prepared for delivery at a Brookings Institution event. In doing so, he became the highest ranking Fed official yet to “talk about talking about” a change in monetary policy. The Fed wants investors to anticipate its plans for the bond purchases to avoid any sharp adjustment in markets and rates when it begins. He said the current language represents “inherent communications challenges” because it does not rely on any particular measure of the job market. An actual interest rate increase, Quarles said, “remains far in the future.” (Writing by Howard Schneider; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama)
Persons: , Randal Quarles, , Quarles, ” Quarles, Howard Schneider, Chizu Nomiyama Organizations: Federal Reserve, ” Fed, Fed
Fed 'talking about talking about' tapering bond buying -Daly
  + stars: | 2021-05-25 | by ( Reuters Staff | ) www.reuters.com + 0.99   time to read: 1 min
FILE PHOTO: San Francisco Federal Reserve President Mary Daly reacts at the Los Angeles World Affairs Council Town Hall, Los Angeles, California, U.S., October 15, 2019. REUTERS/Ann Saphir(Reuters) - Federal Reserve policymakers are “talking about talking about” reducing their support for the economy, but for now policy is in a “very good place,” San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President Mary Daly said on Tuesday. “We haven’t seen substantial further progress just yet,” Daly said in an interview on CNBC, referring to the bar the Fed has set before it would begin to taper its $120 billion a month in asset purchases that is helping support the economy. “It’s too early to say the job is done.”
Persons: Mary Daly, Ann Saphir, , , ” Daly, It’s Organizations: Francisco Federal, Los Angeles World Affairs, Town Hall, REUTERS, Federal Reserve, ” San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank, CNBC Locations: Los Angeles , California, U.S, ” San Francisco
WASHINGTON (Reuters) -Federal Reserve policymakers have begun to acknowledge they are closer to debating when to pull back some of their crisis support for the U.S. economy, even as they say it is still needed to bolster the recovery and employment. Those bond buys, together with near-zero interest rates, are aimed at easing borrowing costs and encouraging hiring and investment. Fed policymakers have promised to give markets plenty of notice before changing policy, to avoid a repeat of the “taper tantrum” spike in bond yields after former Fed Chair Ben Bernanke surprised markets by flagging a reduction to the Fed’s bond-buying in 2013. Most Fed policymakers have stuck to the view that the recent rise in inflation will prove transitory, given its origins in supply and labor market bottlenecks that will in time get worked out. That would be the highest reading since June 1993 and beyond the Fed’s 2% inflation target.
Persons: Mary Daly, ” Daly, Richard Clarida, ” Clarida, Jerome Powell, Ben Bernanke, Esther George, Clarida Organizations: WASHINGTON, Federal Reserve, San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank, CNBC, Yahoo Finance, Fed, , Kansas Locations: U.S, San Francisco, ,
Fed's Barkin: not yet seeing excess leverage in housing market
  + stars: | 2021-05-25 | by ( Reuters Staff | ) www.reuters.com + 0.70   time to read: +1 min
FILE PHOTO: Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond President Thomas Barkin poses during a break at a Dallas Fed conference on technology in Dallas, Texas, U.S., May 23, 2019. REUTERS/Ann Saphir/File Photo(Reuters) - Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond President Thomas Barkin on Tuesday said surging home prices are being driven by a jump in demand and constrained supply but not by excess leverage, reducing the potential risk to the broad financial system should prices fall. “I don’t look at plummeting house prices as a first order risk, but if it were to happen, it only becomes a financial stability risk if you’ve got too much leverage against it,” Barkin told the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce in a virtual event. “That’s what I watch is the leverage in the housing market and again, based on what I can tell, I don’t see it going to excess levels yet; that of course is something we are going to have to watch as we get into this.”
Persons: Thomas Barkin, Ann Saphir, you’ve, ” Barkin, Organizations: Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Dallas Fed, REUTERS, Wilmington Chamber of Commerce Locations: Dallas , Texas, U.S
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Federal Reserve officials and new Dallas Fed data have begun lowering expectations for May jobs growth in the United States as business hiring plans continue to outrun the supply of people able or willing to work. Slideshow ( 2 images )Dallas Federal Reserve president Robert Kaplan said Friday that hiring difficulties have continued through May, and will likely lead to another weak jobs report following the lower-than-expected 266,000 positions added in April. A survey published by the Dallas Fed earlier in the day, meant to provide a mid-month check on national employment trends, pointed to weakening job growth as well. St. Louis Fed president James Bullard earlier this week however called that figure “hyped up,” and said a “more realistic” expectation was for perhaps half a million jobs a month. Philadelphia Fed President Patrick Harker on Friday became the second Fed official, along with Kaplan, to urge a faster start to talks over when and how quickly to reduce the central bank’s $120 billion in monthly bond purchases.
Persons: Robert Kaplan, , Kaplan, Louis, James Bullard, Patrick Harker, ” Harker, Raphael Bostic, Thomas Barkin, they’d, ” Bostic Organizations: WASHINGTON, Federal Reserve, Dallas Fed, Dallas Federal, ” Fed, Louis Fed, Philadelphia Fed, Fed, Washington Post . Atlanta Fed, Richmond Fed Locations: United States, St
Fed, citing crypto risk, to open digital currency debate this summer
  + stars: | 2021-05-20 | by ( Howard Schneider | Ann Saphir | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.99   time to read: +2 min
FILE PHOTO: The Federal Reserve Board building on Constitution Avenue is pictured in Washington, U.S., March 27, 2019. REUTERS/Brendan McDermid/File PhotoWASHINGTON (Reuters) - Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell flagged the risks of cryptocurrencies in an unusual video message on Thursday that also laid out a clearer timetable for the Fed to consider adopting a digital currency of its own. The Fed will ask for public comment as part of the process. The Boston Fed is currently working with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to research the technology that could be used for a central bank digital currency and will be releasing those findings in the third quarter. Powell and other Fed officials however have said they intend to move deliberately to ensure that the benefits outweigh any risks involved.
Persons: Brendan McDermid, Jerome Powell, Powell, ” Powell Organizations: Federal Reserve Board, REUTERS, WASHINGTON, Fed, U.S . Treasury, Boston Fed, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Locations: Washington , U.S, U.S
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