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U.S. screens 2.02 mln airport passengers Friday - highest since March 2020
  + stars: | 2021-06-12 | by ( David Shepardson | ) www.reuters.com sentiment -0.98   time to read: +2 min
REUTERS/Lindsey WassonThe U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) said it screened 2.02 million passengers on Friday at U.S. airports, the highest number since March 2020 when the coronavirus pandemic slashed travel demand. It was the first time daily U.S. airport passengers screened had topped 2 million since March 7, 2020, the TSA said. U.S. air travel demand has been rising steadily for months as more Americans get vaccinated. The lowest screening volume was on April 13, 2020, when just 87,534 individuals were screened at airport security checkpoints, TSA said. TSA is still working to fill many TSA screening positions as travel demand rises.
Persons: Lindsey Wasson, , Darby LaJoye Organizations: Tacoma International, REUTERS, . Transportation Security Administration, TSA, Airlines for America, European, Thomson Locations: Seattle, SeaTac , Washington , U.S, Lindsey Wasson The, U.S, COVID, United States, European Union, Canada, Mexico
Crisis-hit EU airlines seek 'more balanced' passenger rights
  + stars: | 2021-06-10 | by ( ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: +2 min
Airlines for Europe (A4E), which represents the region's biggest carriers, said the so-called EU261 regulation had severely exacerbated the financial crisis for many airlines. "We're looking for a more balanced approach to consumer protection," Air France-KLM Chief Executive Ben Smith said, adding that the European Union's passenger rights law was "one of the most punitive" in the world. The European Commission indicated it was not ready to consider any weakening of passenger rights. "We have always tried to strike the right balance between consumer protection and the protection of the tourism and transport industry," an EU official said. "The continued and improved protection of passenger rights is crucial to ensuring the necessary consumer trust in the transport sector."
Persons: Christian, Ben Smith, Smith, Johan Lundgren Organizations: Air, Air France Airbus, Charles, REUTERS, Christian Hartmann, Airlines for, Air France, KLM, Lufthansa, Ryanair, European Commission, EU, Thomson Locations: Air France, Gaulle, Roissy, Paris, France, Airlines for Europe
A logo of Airbus is seen at the entrance of its factory in Blagnac near Toulouse, France, July 2, 2020. REUTERS/Benoit TessierAirbus (AIR.PA) and Air France-KLM (AIRF.PA) have urged policymakers to use EU-backed green stimulus funds to support aircraft sales, according to documents released on Thursday by InfluenceMap, an investor-led climate lobbying watchdog. "Support could take the form of a 'green stimulus' subsidy scheme," according to an Air France-KLM "key messages" digest dated March 26. Another BNP-led demand for climate lobbying disclosures by Delta Air Lines (DAL.N) has been endorsed by influential proxy advisers ISS and Glass Lewis ahead of next Thursday's shareholder meeting. "The idea that we have 'actively lobbied' against EU climate policies to reach these targets is false," A4E said.
Persons: Benoit Tessier Airbus, InfluenceMap, Frans Timmermans, Glass Lewis, A4E Organizations: Airbus, REUTERS, Air France, KLM, European Commission, Exxon, BNP, Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Industry, Airlines for, Lufthansa, Ryanair, SAF, EU, Thomson Locations: Blagnac, Toulouse, France, Air France, Paris, Brussels, United States, Europe, Airlines for Europe, COVID
A Spirit Airlines jet comes in for a landing at McCarran International Airport on May 25, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Spirit Airlines is planning to expand to Miami International Airport later this year, increasing competition among airlines for Florida travelers. Budget airline Spirit, based in Miramar, Florida, said late Tuesday that it plans to offer flights starting in October from 30 cities, including New York, Cleveland and Denver. Southwest Airlines last year unveiled plans to start Miami service as carriers looked for popular tourist destinations and took advantage of a lull in demand in many other destinations. Spirit said it is not planning to reduce flying at its hub at Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
Organizations: Spirit Airlines, McCarran International Airport, Las Vegas , Nevada . Spirit Airlines, International, Budget, American Airlines, Southwest Airlines, Miami, United Airlines, Airlines, Sunshine State, Airlines for America Locations: Las Vegas , Nevada, Florida, Miramar , Florida, New York, Cleveland, Denver, Cali, Medellin, Colombia, Port, Prince, Haiti, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic . Miami, America, Caribbean, Miami, Sunshine, U.S, Fort Lauderdale , Florida, FLL
Senators criticize U.S. airlines for not eliminating voucher expiration dates
  + stars: | 2021-06-01 | by ( ) www.reuters.com sentiment -1.00   time to read: 1 min
A Delta Connection Embraer ERJ-175LR plane lands as a United Express Embraer ERJ-175LR plane waits to take off at LAX airport in Los Angeles, California U.S. January 10, 2018. REUTERS/Lucy NicholsonTwo senators on Monday criticized seven major U.S. airlines for failing to make all pandemic-related flight credits valid indefinitely and vowed to pursue legislative or regulatory actions in response. Democrats Edward Markey and Richard Blumenthal said the airlines trade group had "refused to offer any commitment to expand cash refund policies or eliminate expiration dates for pandemic-related flight credits." The lawmakers said the airlines "continue to sit on more than $10 billion in unused flight credits and are still refusing to return consumers' hard-earned money, more than a year after the pandemic began." read moreOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Lucy Nicholson, Edward Markey, Richard Blumenthal Organizations: Delta, Embraer, United Express Embraer, LAX, Los Angeles , California U.S, REUTERS, Thomson Locations: Los Angeles , California
REUTERS/Lucy NicholsonTwo senators on Monday criticized seven major U.S. airlines for failing to make all pandemic-related flight credits valid indefinitely and vowed to pursue legislative or regulatory actions in response. Democrats Edward Markey and Richard Blumenthal said the airlines trade group had "refused to offer any commitment to expand cash refund policies or eliminate expiration dates for pandemic-related flight credits." The lawmakers said the airlines "continue to sit on more than $10 billion in unused flight credits and are still refusing to return consumers' hard-earned money, more than a year after the pandemic began." On Friday, trade group Airlines for America representing American Airlines (AAL.O), United Airlines (UAL.O), Delta Air Lines (DAL.N), Southwest Airlines (LUV.N) and others told the senators in a letter that major U.S. airlines issued $12.84 billion in cash refunds to customers in 2020 as the coronavirus pandemic upended the travel industry. Airlines have faced criticism over their handling of redemptions for flights canceled during the pandemic.
Persons: Lucy Nicholson, Edward Markey, Richard Blumenthal, Nicholas Calio, Calio Organizations: Delta, Embraer, United Express Embraer, LAX, Los Angeles , California U.S, REUTERS, Airlines for America, American Airlines, United Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines, Airlines, Reuters, Thomson Locations: Los Angeles , California, U.S
Passengers have to wear masks on flights – but some are refusing to comply. The FAA has received about 1,900 reports of "unruly" passenger behavior related to masks since January 1. Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), said that the number of reported unruly passengers was around 20 times higher than during a typical year. The TSA says fully vaccinated people must therefore wear a mask on public transit, including planes, trains, and buses. Nelson had previously said that these incidents of unruly passengers were becoming both more frequent and more severe.
Persons: Steve Dickson, We've, Dickson, Sara Nelson, Read, Nelson, Nicholas Calio, I've, Insider's Tim Levin, , aren't, Lyft Organizations: FAA, Federal Aviation Administration, The New York Times, Association of Flight, Breeze, Disease Control, Prevention, Transportation Security Administration, TSA, Airlines for, Transport Safety Administration Locations: Airlines for America
A general view of the international arrival terminal at JFK airport in New York October 11, 2014. REUTERS/Eduardo MunozEleven U.S. airlines issued $12.84 billion in cash refunds to customers in 2020 as the coronavirus pandemic upended the travel industry, the head of industry trade group Airlines for America (A4A) said in a letter to lawmakers on Friday. Airlines have faced a backlash from passengers and some lawmakers over their handling of redemptions for flights canceled during the pandemic. Earlier this month, Senators Edward Markey and Richard Blumenthal called on carriers to issue cash refunds whether flights were canceled by the airline or traveler. A forecast surge in summer leisure travel as more Americans become vaccinated against the coronavirus is expected to help airlines return to positive cash flow after record losses last year.
Persons: Eduardo Munoz, Edward Markey, Richard Blumenthal, Nicholas Calio, Calio Organizations: REUTERS, Eduardo Munoz Eleven U.S, Airlines for, Airlines, Reuters, Thomson Locations: JFK, New York, Airlines for America
Americans wait on tenterhooks for official word on traveling abroad again
  + stars: | 2021-05-25 | by ( ) www.nbcnews.com sentiment -0.97   time to read: +2 min
Industry officials think Biden could lift restriction on the United Kingdom and Ireland as soon as early June. Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said at the press conference the government is "following the facts, the data, the science in making the decision as to when business, international travel actually can resume... The administration has been holding extensive meetings about relaxing some of those travel restrictions, officials have told Reuters, but made no decisions. Industry officials think Biden could lift restriction on the United Kingdom and Ireland as soon as early June. United Airlines, Delta Air Lines and American Airlines are preparing for a lifting of European travel restrictions this summer.
Persons: Darby LaJoye, LaJoye, Biden, Alejandro Mayorkas, Roger Dow, Nick Calio Organizations: Reagan National Airport, Transportation Security Administration, Industry, Homeland, Reuters, U.S . Travel Association, Airlines, United Airlines, Delta Air Lines, American Airlines, Airlines for Locations: Washington, Europe, South Africa, India, China, Iran, Brazil, United Kingdom, Ireland, Covid, Airlines for America
REUTERS/Carlos BarriaU.S. lawmakers plan to introduce a bill on Thursday that would create a tax credit for lower-carbon sustainable aviation fuel, which they hope will slash emissions of greenhouse gases from the aviation industry. The legislation, seen by Reuters, would impose a tax incentive of up to $2.00 for every gallon produced of sustainable aviation fuel, which can be made from feedstocks such as grease, animal fats and plant oils. It was not immediately clear whether the sustainable aviation fuel bill would have Republican support. While U.S. sustainable aviation fuel use has risen in recent years, it remains a fraction of the larger traditional petroleum-based jet fuel market. Producers of sustainable aviation fuel can earn the tax credit if the fuel achieves at least a 50% lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions reduction compared with petroleum-based jet fuel, according to the legislation.
Persons: Carlos Barria, Brad Schneider, Dan Kildee, Julia Brownley, Joe Biden's, John Holler Organizations: Los Angeles International Airport, REUTERS, Reuters, United, U.S . Energy Information Administration, U.S, Democrat, Republicans, Airlines, Air Transport Action, Environmental Defense Fund, World Wildlife Fund, United Airlines and Airlines for, Wildlife Fund, Producers, Solutions, Thomson Locations: Los Angeles , California, U.S, United States, Illinois, Michigan, California, United Airlines and Airlines for America
You still need to wear a mask. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday said fully vaccinated people no longer need to wear masks indoors and don't have to physically distance in that setting either. But a federal rule that requires that all air, rail and bus travelers over the age of 2 to wear a mask is still in effect, the Transportation Security Administration said Thursday. Carriers are now expecting travel to continue rebounding through the summer after more people have been vaccinated and attractions reopen. Flight attendant labor unions whose members were left to enforce airline policies urged the Biden administration for a mask mandate to help add more weight to the policy.
Persons: Biden, Sara Nelson Organizations: San Francisco International Airport, Disease Control, Transportation Security, Airlines, Carriers, United Airlines, Airlines for America, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines, Federal Aviation Administration, FAA, JetBlue Airways, Association of Flight, CWA, U.S Locations: San Francisco , California, U.S, New York, Dominican Republic, Chicago, Sacramento , California
A United Airlines passenger aircraft arrives over the top of residential houses to land at Heathrow Airport in west London, Britain, March 13, 2020. The CEOs of several large U.S. and U.K. airlines on Tuesday ramped up pressure on their respective governments to revive air travel between the two countries, asking for a summit to discuss the issue. "U.S. and UK citizens would benefit from the significant testing capability and the successful trials of digital applications to verify health credentials." The letter was signed by the CEOs of Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, American Airlines, British Airways, Virgin Atlantic and JetBlue Airways, which aims to launch U.S.-U.K. service this summer, and U.S. industry group Airlines for America. The executives pointed to the rise in vaccinations and the economic benefits of reopening travel.
Persons: Pete Buttigieg, Grant Shapps, Transport didn't Organizations: United Airlines, Heathrow Airport, . Transportation, Delta Air Lines, American Airlines, British Airways, Virgin Atlantic, JetBlue Airways, Airlines for America, U.S, U.S . Transportation Department, Department, Transport Locations: London, Britain, U.S
CDC says U.S.-bound travelers can use some self COVID-19 tests
  + stars: | 2021-05-07 | by ( ) www.reuters.com + 1.00   time to read: 1 min
Travelers walk through a pick-up area in the arrivals section at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport in SeaTac, Washington, U.S. April 12, 2021. REUTERS/Lindsey WassonThe U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said Friday that U.S.-bound international travelers can use some self COVID-19 tests to meet entry requirements. In January, the CDC mandated all passengers two and older get negative COVID tests within three days of coming to the United States or show proof of recovery from COVID-19. Airlines for America, a trade group, praised the CDC decision "to allow FDA-approved proctored home testing for international passengers entering the U.S. This is an encouraging step in facilitating the international travel process."
Persons: Lindsey Wasson Organizations: Tacoma International, REUTERS, Lindsey Wasson The U.S . Centers for Disease Control, Prevention, CDC, Airlines for America, FDA, U.S, Thomson Locations: Seattle, SeaTac , Washington , U.S, Lindsey Wasson The, United States, COVID
REUTERS/Chris HelgrenMembers of a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee will meet on Tuesday with representatives from the biofuels and airline industries to discuss ways to expand production of low-carbon aviation fuel, a panel spokeswoman said. The biofuels industry group represents about 30 companies and the airlines industry group represents about 10 airlines and delivery companies. The virtual meeting is intended to educate subcommittee members about so-called sustainable aviation fuel, an alternative to traditional jet fuel that can be made using animal fat, used cooking oil and plant oils, the sources said. Airlines and renewable fuel producers have promoted sustainable aviation fuel as a way to help reduce aviation industry carbon emissions, though it currently is expensive to make and would require subsidies to be competitive. The Biden administration last month issued a new tax proposal that includes a blender's tax credit for sustainable aviation fuel, which the Treasury Department said would enable "the decarbonization of a key portion of the U.S. transportation sector."
Persons: Chris Helgren, Joe Biden's, Biden Organizations: United Airlines, Newark Liberty International Airport, REUTERS, . House, U.S, Democratic, Committee, Transportation, Infrastructure, Energy, Advanced Biofuels Association, Airlines for, Treasury Department, Air Transport Action, Office, Thomson Locations: New York City, New Jersey, U.S, Airlines for America
REUTERS/Chris HelgrenMembers of a U.S. House of Representatives subcommittee met on Tuesday with representatives from the biofuels and airline industries to discuss ways to expand production of low-carbon aviation fuel, the subcommittee chair told Reuters. The biofuels industry group represents about 30 companies and the airlines industry group represents about 10 airlines and delivery companies. "There's not a lot of SAF (sustainable aviation fuel) being used right now relative to the U.S. demand for aviation fuel writ large, but there's a lot coming online," Larsen said. "The biggest effort from a policy point of view is to include the aviation fuel in the blender's tax credit." Airlines and renewable fuel producers have promoted sustainable aviation fuel as a way to help reduce aviation industry carbon emissions, though it is currently expensive to make and would require subsidies to be competitive.
Persons: Chris Helgren, Joe Biden's, Rick Larsen, " Larsen, Biden Organizations: United Airlines, Newark Liberty International Airport, REUTERS, . House, Reuters, U.S, Democratic, Committee, Transportation, Infrastructure, Energy, Advanced Biofuels Association, Airlines for, SAF, Airlines, Treasury Department, Air Transport Action, Office, Thomson Locations: New York City, New Jersey, U.S, Airlines for America
REUTERS/Toby MelvilleA coalition of U.S. and European travel, airline, union, business and airport groups on Monday called for fully reopening the U.S.-UK air travel market "as soon as safely possible." In a letter to U.S. President Joe Biden and British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, the groups said the leaders' planned meeting in early June "would be an ideal opportunity for a joint announcement of the full reopening of the U.S.-UK air travel market for both U.S. and UK citizens." The United States since March 2020 has barred nearly all non-U.S. citizens who have recently been in the UK from the United States. "Safely reopening borders between the U.S. and UK is essential for both countries’ economic recovery from COVID-19." In January, Biden reversed a decision made by President Donald Trump to rescind the entry bans on the UK and other European countries.
Persons: Toby Melville, Joe Biden, Boris Johnson, Jen Psaki, Biden, Donald Trump Organizations: Airport, REUTERS, U.S, ., British, U.S ., Transatlantic, U.S . Chamber of Commerce, Airlines for America, Global Business Travel Association, Air Line Pilots Association, Virgin Atlantic, Association of UK Airlines, Aerospace Industries Association, Thomson Locations: London, Britain, U.S, United States, COVID, India, Brazil, China, Iran, South Africa, Ireland, Europe
U.S. President Joe Biden on Friday imposed new travel restrictions on India in light of the COVID-19 epidemic, barring most non-U.S. citizens from entering the United States. loadingThe decision to impose the latest travel restrictions came about quickly and was only reached in the last 24 hours, sources said. Other countries have imposed similar travel restrictions on India, including the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and Singapore, while Canada, Hong Kong and New Zealand have suspended all commercial travel with India. AIR TRAVELNearly all travelers to the United States by air must show proof of a negative coronavirus test or recovery from COVID-19. U.S. airlines and travel groups have urged the White House to set benchmarks for the eventual loosening of restrictions.
Persons: Joe Biden, Biden, unconsicous, Adnan Abidi Read Organizations: U.S . Centers for Disease Control, Prevention, White, Reuters, Permanent, Indian Embassy, REUTERS, House, United, AstraZeneca, AIR, White House, U.S, Airlines for America, Thomson Locations: India, United States, South Africa, U.S, Brazil, United Kingdom, Ireland, Europe, China, Iran, Permanent U.S, Washington, Ghaziabad, Germany, Italy, Singapore, Canada, Hong Kong and New Zealand, COVID
REUTERS/Lindsey WassonThe U.S. State Department has added about 100 countries this week to its "Level Four: Do Not Travel" advisory list, putting the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Mexico, Germany and others on the list, citing a "very high level of COVID-19." On Monday, the State Department said it would boost the number of countries receiving its highest advisory rating to about 80% of countries worldwide. Before Tuesday, the State Department listed 34 out of about 200 countries as "Do Not Travel." Other countries in the "Do Not Travel" list include Finland, Egypt, Belgium, Turkey, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain. On Tuesday, the United States extended by another 30 days restrictions barring non-essential travel at its Canadian and Mexican borders.
Persons: Lindsey Wasson, Rochelle Walensky Organizations: Tacoma International, REUTERS, Lindsey Wasson The U.S . State Department, State Department, The State Department, State, Disease Control, Airlines for America, CDC, Thomson Locations: Seattle, SeaTac , Washington , U.S, Lindsey Wasson The, United Kingdom, Canada, France, Mexico, Germany, Finland, Egypt, Belgium, Turkey, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, China, Japan, Europe, Washington, Brazil, Iran, South Africa, United States, U.S
REUTERS/Lindsey WassonThe U.S. State Department has added at least 116 countries this week to its “Level Four: Do Not Travel” advisory list, putting the UK, Canada, France, Israel, Mexico, Germany and others on the list, citing a “very high level of COVID-19.”On Monday, the State Department said it would boost the number of countries receiving its highest advisory rating to about 80% of countries worldwide. Before Tuesday, the State Department listed 34 out of about 200 countries as "Do Not Travel." The State Department now lists 150 countries at Level Four. Other countries in the "Do Not Travel" list include Finland, Egypt, Belgium, Turkey, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland and Spain. Some countries like China and Japan remain at Level 3: Reconsider Travel."
Persons: Lindsey Wasson, , Nick Calio, Rochelle Walensky Organizations: Tacoma International, REUTERS, Lindsey Wasson The U.S . State Department, State Department, State, U.S . Centers for Disease Control, Airlines for America, U.S, Senate, CDC, Thomson Locations: Seattle, SeaTac , Washington , U.S, Lindsey Wasson The, Canada, France, Israel, Mexico, Germany, Finland, Egypt, Belgium, Turkey, Italy, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, China, Japan, Europe, Washington, Brazil, Iran, South Africa, United States, U.S
U.S. State Department says it will boost 'Do Not Travel' advisories to 80% of the world
  + stars: | 2021-04-20 | by ( ) www.cnbc.com sentiment -0.78   time to read: +2 min
The U.S. State Department said on Monday it will boost its "Do Not Travel" guidance to about 80% of countries worldwide, citing "unprecedented risk to travelers" from the Covid-19 pandemic. "This update will result in a significant increase in the number of countries at Level 4: Do Not Travel, to approximately 80% of countries worldwide," the department said in a statement. The State Department already listed 34 out of about 200 countries as "Level 4: Do Not Travel," including places like Chad, Kosovo, Kenya, Brazil, Argentina, Haiti, Mozambique, Russia and Tanzania. The State Department said the move does not imply a reassessment of current health situations in some countries, but rather "reflects an adjustment in the State Department's Travel Advisory system to rely more on (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention's) existing epidemiological assessments." Asked for comment on the State Department announcement, Airlines for America, a trade group representing major U.S. carriers, said "the U.S. airline industry has been a strong advocate for the development of a risk-based, data-driven roadmap for restoring international travel."
Persons: Rochelle Walensky, Walensky Organizations: New York Army National Guard, LaGuardia, U.S . State Department, State Department, The State Department, State, Disease Control, Airlines for America, U.S, CDC, Covid Locations: New York, U.S, Chad, Kosovo, Kenya, Brazil, Argentina, Haiti, Mozambique, Russia, Tanzania, Europe, Washington, China, Iran, South Africa, United States
Airlines are rejecting the CDC's study suggesting blocking middle seats, citing newer findings. Blocking middle seats, however, serve as a peace of mind measure for those returning to flying. Delta is currently the last airline to still block middle seats but will stop doing so on May 1, the longest run of any US airline to block seats. But science aside, blocking middle seats served a valuable purpose during the pandemic: inspiring peace of mind among travelers returning to flying after months of being grounded. I was lucky to be flying Delta, however, as I'm sure my panic would have been worsened if I was on a packed plane.
Persons: Ed Bastian, Read, , wasn't, I'd, doesn't Organizations: Airlines, Centers for Disease Control, Airlines for, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, CNBC, Airline, CDC, Harvard, of Public Health, Southwest Airlines Locations: COVID, U.S, Airlines for America, Delta, Chan
Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian said on CNBC Thursday flying in the middle seat is "absolutely safe." Delta Air Lines is holding firm on its commitment to end a year-long middle seat block despite a newly released report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that recommends keeping middle seats open to reduce the spread of COVID-19. The airline deferred to trade organization Airlines for America when asked for comment on the CDC report. Harteveldt noted, however, that the Harvard study was funded by the airline industry while the DOD study was not. Come May 1, however, the American traveling public will not have an option to travel on a major commercial airline where middle seats are blocked.
Persons: Ed Bastian, Bastian, Henry Ting, Henry Harteveldt, Harteveldt Organizations: Delta Air, CNBC, Mayo Clinic, Emory University, Delta Air Lines, Centers for Disease Control, Delta, Airlines for, CDC, Atmosphere Research, US Department of Defense, United Airlines, Harvard, of Public Health, DOD Locations: COVID, Airlines for America, Chan
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just reignited the debate on whether airlines should be blocking middle seats just as airlines thought it was settled. Multiple airlines including American Airlines, United Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Hawaiian Air, and Southwest Airlines deferred to the trade organization Airlines for America on the issue when reached for comment by Insider. Delta Air Lines is the only major US airline currently blocking middle seats but will stop doing so May 1. Sun Country Airlines, which doesn't currently block middle seats, told Insider: "We do not currently have plans to change any of our existing seating policies." Harteveldt says that airlines will not likely revert to blocking middle seats unless mandated by the federal government.
Persons: Hilary Brueck, doesn't, we've, Erin Blanton, Henry Harteveldt, Harteveldt Organizations: CDC, Airlines for America, Disease Control, Flyers, American Airlines, United Airlines, Delta Air Lines, Hawaiian Air, Southwest Airlines, Airlines, DOD, Harvard, International Air Transport Association, Airline, US Department of Defense, Harvard School of Public Health, Sun Country Airlines, Centers for Disease Control, National Air Carriers Association, Alaska Airlines, JetBlue Airways, Spirit Airlines, Frontier Airlines, Atmosphere Research, Transportation Security Administration Locations: COVID, America
Airlines will likely not be blocking middle seats despite a new CDC recommendation. Airlines are not convinced by the newly-released report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that says blocking middle seats will better reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus, more so than what they're doing now. Masks have been required onboard commercial airline flights for almost a year now and any major outbreak would have been well noted and investigated. Reverting back to the days of blocking middle seats would also wreak havoc on airlines that have begun selling tickets on planes to capacity for the summer. Delta Air Lines is set to end its middle-seat block on May 1, at which point none of the 11 major US airlines will offer the policy.
Persons: Henry Harteveldt, Harteveldt, isn't Organizations: CDC, Centers for Disease Control, Delta Air Lines, Airlines for America, American Airlines, United Airlines, . Airlines, Atmosphere Research, US Department of Defense, Harvard School of Public Health, Harvard, DOD, Travelers, American Airlines and United Airlines, Air Lines, Amtrak, Airline Locations: Delta
The “Made In America” tax plan did not specify which tax breaks for fossil fuel companies would be targeted. One of the top fossil fuel breaks is called intangible drilling costs, which allows producers to deduct most costs from drilling new wells. The Biden tax plan would advance clean electricity production by providing a 10-year extension of the production tax credit and investment tax credit for clean energy generation, such as wind and solar power, and energy storage such as advanced batteries. Unwinding tax breaks on fossil fuel companies could face opposition from Biden’s fellow Democrats in the U.S. Congress from energy-producing states. FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRY RESPONSEThe plan is expected to face resistance from fossil fuel lobbyists.
Persons: Janet Yellen, Joe Biden’s, Joe Biden, Kevin Lamarque, Biden, Nancy Young Organizations: WASHINGTON, . Treasury, White, Washington , D.C, REUTERS, Treasury Department, Taxation, Environmental Protection Agency, U.S, Greenpeace, American Petroleum Institute, drillers, , Treasury, Airlines for Locations: Washington ,, America, U.S, Airlines for America
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