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Can Biden Avert a Crisis With North Korea?
  + stars: | 2022-01-27 | by ( Edward Wong | ) www.nytimes.com   time to read: +1 min
WASHINGTON — After North Korea ushered in the new year with four sets of ballistic missile tests this month, the Biden administration turned to a well-thumbed page in the Washington playbook: It called for more United Nations sanctions. China and Russia blocked the proposal last week in the U.N. Security Council. And Kim Jong-un, the leader of North Korea, appears unfazed by the threat of more U.N. and Treasury Department sanctions — he fired off two cruise missiles on Tuesday and two more ballistic missiles on Thursday, for a total of six weapons tests this month, equal to the number for all of last year. “This is a deeply isolated, autarkic economy,” said John Delury, a professor of history at Yonsei University in Seoul. “No amount of sanctions could create the pressures that Covid created in the last two years.
Persons: Biden, Kim Jong, , John Delury, Covid, Biden’s, Kim, Organizations: WASHINGTON, Washington, United, . Security, Treasury Department, Yonsei University, North Locations: North Korea, United Nations, China, Russia, Seoul,
MOSCOW, Jan 27 (Reuters) - The Kremlin said on Thursday there was room to continue dialogue with the United States, but that it looked clear Russia's main security demands had not been taken into account by Washington. Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Moscow would not rush to draw conclusions after the United States formally responded on Wednesday to its proposals for a redrawing of post-Cold War security arrangements in Europe. Describing tensions on the continent as reminiscent of the Cold War, Peskov said it would take time for Moscow to review the U.S. response. In separate comments, Russia's top diplomat said that there was hope of starting serious dialogue, but only on secondary questions and not on the fundamental ones, Russian news agencies reported. Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com RegisterReporting by Dmitry Antonov and Maxim Rodionov; Writing by Tom Balmforth; Editing by Mark TrevelyanOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Jan, Dmitry Peskov, Peskov, Vladimir Putin, Sergei Lavrov, Dmitry Antonov, Maxim Rodionov, Tom Balmforth, Mark Trevelyan Organizations: United, NATO, Thomson Locations: MOSCOW, United States, Washington, Kremlin, Moscow, Europe
Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Moscow, which has massed troops near Ukraine, would not rush to draw conclusions after Washington formally responded to Russian proposals for a redrawing of post-Cold War security arrangements in Europe. Describing tensions on the continent as reminiscent of the Cold War, Peskov said it would take time for Moscow to review Wednesday's response from Washington. But he said U.S. and NATO statements that Russia's main demands were unacceptable did not leave much room for optimism. Russian and Ukrainian dollar bonds, which have been hammered in recent weeks by the mounting tension, both rose in response to Peskov's comments. 1/4 A Russian army service member fires a howitzer during drills at the Kuzminsky range in the southern Rostov region, Russia January 26, 2022.
Persons: Jan, Dmitry Peskov, Peskov, Sergey Pivovarov Read, Sergei Lavrov, Antony Blinken, Washington, Dmytro Kuleba, Dmitry Antonov, Tom Balmforth, Mark Trevelyan, Timothy Organizations: United, U.S, Russian, REUTERS, NATO, Ukrainian, Timothy Heritage, Thomson Locations: Russia, RUSSIA, UKRAINE, MOSCOW, United States, Ukraine, Moscow, Washington, Europe, Rostov, Denmark, Kyiv
North Korea appears to have fired cruise missiles, South says
  + stars: | 2022-01-25 | by ( ) www.nbcnews.com   time to read: +1 min
SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea fired what appeared to be two cruise missiles into the sea off its east coast on Tuesday, South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said, days after a flurry of ballistic missile tests. South Korea’s military is assessing the launches to determine the nature of the projectiles, it said. Such a launch would be its fifth missile test of the year, as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has vowed to bolster the military with cutting-edge technology at a time when talks with South Korea and the United States have stalled. Cruise missile launches by the North are not banned under U.N. sanctions imposed on Pyongyang, which has defied international condemnation and conducted four rounds of ballistic missile tests, the most recent on Jan. 17. North Korea has said it is open to talks, but only if the United States and others drop “hostile policies” such as sanctions and military drills.
Persons: Kim Jong Un, Biden Organizations: Korea’s, Chiefs, Staff, South, NBC, United Nations, Cruise, . Security Locations: SEOUL, South Korea, North Korea, United States, Pyongyang, China, Russia, Korea
SEOUL, Jan 25 (Reuters) - North Korea fired what appeared to be two cruise missiles into the sea off its east coast on Tuesday, South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said, days after a flurry of ballistic missile tests. South Korea's military is assessing the launches to determine the nature of the projectiles, it said. Such a launch would be its fifth missile test of the year, as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has vowed to bolster the military with cutting-edge technology at a time when talks with South Korea and the United States have stalled. North Korea has said it is open to talks, but only if the United States and others drop "hostile policies" such as sanctions and military drills. Register now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com RegisterReporting by Jack Kim; Editing by Kim Coghill and Gerry DoyleOur Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
Persons: Kim Jong Un, Biden, Jack Kim, Kim Coghill, Gerry Doyle Organizations: Korea's, Chiefs, Staff, South, Cruise, United, . Security, Thomson Locations: SEOUL, North Korea, South Korea, United States, Pyongyang, China, Russia, Korea
Syrians have never been able to challenge the Assad regime’s violations of their human rights in their own country. Created to investigate and prosecute four core international crimes — genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and the crime of aggression — in situations where states are “unable” or “unwilling” to do so themselves, the I.C.C. Alternatively, the U.N. Security Council may refer states to the I.C.C., but the Security Council members Russia and China vetoed referring the Syrian regime in May 2014. Such jurisdiction allows for the prosecution of those core international crimes no matter where they were committed, and irrespective of the location or nationality of the defendant or plaintiff involved. They have found willing partners in German civil society and the German federal public prosecutor general’s office, which handles cases relating to international war crimes.
Persons: , , , Gamal Abdel Nasser, Hafez al, Assad, d’être Organizations: United, Stasi, European Union, Criminal, . Security, Security Locations: U.S, Syria, United States, Hamburg, Egypt, Republic, Soviet Union, Damascus, Syrian, Rome, nonparties, Russia, Israel, Iran, Saudi Arabia, China, Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Germany
A Saudi-led military coalition that has been fighting the Iran-aligned Houthi group since 2015 said the report would be fully investigated. A Save the Children statement said more than 60 adults were killed in air strikes in Yemen on Friday, adding three children were killed when missiles struck the western city of Hodeidah. 1/4 Damage after an airstrike hit a temporary detention centre is seen in Saada, Yemen, January 21, 2022 in this still image obtained from a video. The Saudi-led alliance on Thursday reported operations against "Houthi military capabilities" in Hodeidah, ballistic missile launch platforms in Bayda province in central Yemen and military targets in Yemen's Houthi-held capital Sanaa. When asked about the air strikes on Yemen on Friday, UAE U.N.
Persons: Jan, Turki al, Al, Masirah, Lana Nusseibeh, Michelle Nichols, Ghaida Ghantous, William Maclean Organizations: United Arab Emirates, REUTERS, Read, Reuters, . Security, UAE, UAE U.N, Thomson Locations: SAADA, Yemen, Houthi, Saada, Saudi, Iran, Hodeidah, Horn, Africa, Saudi Arabia, Aden, Bayda province, Yemen's, Sanaa, UAE, New York
SEOUL, South Korea — Accusing the United States of hostility and threats, North Korea on Thursday said it will consider restarting “all temporally-suspended activities” it had paused during its diplomacy with the Trump administration, in an apparent threat to resume testing of nuclear explosives and long-range missiles. The U.N. Security Council has scheduled a closed-door meeting for Thursday to discuss North Korea and non-proliferation matters. Boo Seung-Chan, spokesman of South Korea’s Defense Ministry, said it was closely monitoring North Korea’s military activities but didn’t make presumptions about what the North’s next steps would be. North Korea appeared this month to have resumed railroad freight traffic with China that had been suspended for two years. North Korea conducted its sixth and last test of a nuclear explosive device in September 2017 and its last launch of an ICBM was in November that year.
Persons: Trump, Kim Jong, , Kim, Biden, Boo Seung, Chan, Donald Trump Organizations: South Korea —, Korean Central News Agency, Workers ’ Party, , NBC, Foreign, . Security, South Korea’s Defense Ministry, Trump Locations: SEOUL, South Korea, United States, North Korea, Washington, Korean, American, North, ” U.S, China
A child looks out from a tent at a Sahrawi refugee camp in Tindouf, Algeria January 17, 2022. Staffan de Mistura, the new U.N. envoy, this month visited Morocco, Algeria, Mauritania, and the camps in Tindouf, where the Polisario has established what it calls a Western Sahara government. The Polisario, which fought the Spanish army before Morocco, says it is fighting for self determination for the Sahrawi people, a struggle Algeria says it supports. In late 2020 Washington agreed to recognise Moroccan sovereignty over Western Sahara but European countries have not followed suit. In the Tindouf camps, people said they were still hoping for a referendum.
Persons: Ramzi Boudina TINDOUF, Jan, Algeria's, Bouna Mohamed, Staffan de Mistura, Mistura's, he's, Mohamed, it's, Saydet Hmida, Lamine Chikhi, Angus McDowall Organizations: REUTERS, United Nations, Polisario Front, Polisario, Diplomats, . Security, Moroccan, UNHCR, Thomson Locations: Tindouf, Algeria, Morocco, Western, Mauritania, Sahara, Spanish, Washington, Western Sahara
North Korea tested a railway-borne missile in its firing drills on Friday, state media KCNA said on Saturday, amid a U.S. push for fresh sanctions against the isolated state following its recent series of weapons tests. Since New Year's Day, North Korea has launched three ballistic missiles in an unusually fast sequence of weapons tests. Hours before the latest test drill, North Korea slammed the United States for pursuing new sanctions in response to its recent missile launches, calling it a "provocation" and warning of a strong reaction. North Korea has defended the missile tests as its sovereign right to self-defence and accused the United States of intentionally escalating the situation with new sanctions. South Korean Chung Eui-yong and U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken condemned the latest launch during their phone call on Saturday and coordinated responses to the North's recent missile tests, the State Department said.
Persons: KCNA, Joe Biden's, Kim Jong, Korean Chung, Antony Blinken Organizations: Korea's, Chiefs, Staff, Pyongyang, . Security Council, State Department Locations: Korea, U.S, North Korea, North Pyongan Province, United States, Korean, Pyongyang
SEOUL — North Korea warned on Friday that it would take “stronger and certain reaction” if the United States helped impose more sanctions on the North in response to its recent series of missile tests. The statement by the North’s Foreign Ministry came after a proposal by the United States that the U.N. Security Council place fresh sanctions on North Korea following its six ballistic and other missile tests since September 2021. The tit for tat between North Korea and the United States raised tensions at a sensitive time in the region, as China geared up for hosting the Winter Olympics in Beijing next month and South Korea for its presidential election on March 9. Separately on Wednesday, the Biden administration blacklisted five North Korean officials active in Russia and China who Washington said were responsible for procuring goods for North Korea’s weapons of mass destruction and ballistic missile-related programs.
Persons: Biden, Washington Organizations: North’s Foreign, . Security Locations: SEOUL, North Korea, United States, China, Beijing, South Korea, Russia
A German court on Thursday convicted a former Syrian secret police officer of crimes against humanity for overseeing the abuse of detainees at a jail near Damascus a decade ago. Thomas Lohnes / AFP - Getty Images fileA junior officer, Eyad al-Gharib, was convicted last year of accessory to crimes against humanity and sentenced by the Koblenz court to 4½ years in prison. “The verdict is a breakthrough for Syrian victims and the German justice system in cracking the wall of impunity,” she added. The group represented several victims who under German law were able to take part in the proceedings as co-plaintiffs. Conservative estimates put the number of those detained or forcibly disappeared in Syria at 149,000, more than 85 percent of them at the hands of the Syrian government, according to the Syrian Network for Human Rights.
Persons: Bashar al, Anwar Raslan, Al Khatib, Raslan, Thomas Lohnes, Eyad, , Balkees Jarrah, Bernd Lauter, Patrick Kroker, Caesar Organizations: Getty, Criminal, . Security, Human Rights Watch, ” Prosecutors, European Center for Constitutional, Human, Conservative, Syrian Network for Human Rights, al Locations: Damascus, Koblenz, Syrian, AFP, Germany, Syria, Russia, China, Hague
MPs have been warned by MI5 of the activities of an individual working with the Chinese Communist Party. Christine Lee, a solicitor with offices in London, was named as engaging in political interference activities. Lee's firm has given more than £427,000 in financial support to Labour MP Barry Gardiner since 2015, Electoral Commission records show. Electoral Commission records show Lee has given more than £427,000 in financial support to Labour MP Barry Gardiner since 2015. Her law firm, with offices in London, Birmingham, and Beijing, was chief legal adviser to the Chinese embassy in London, the Times reported.
Persons: Christine Lee, Barry Gardiner, Lee, Lee's, Gardiner, Tom Tugendhat Organizations: Chinese Communist Party, Labour, Electoral Commission, Service, Privacy, UK's Security, Parliamentary, Daily Mail, Foreign, China Research Group, Times, Parliamentarians, . Security Locations: London, Chinese, Beijing, Birmingham, Westminster
The son of suspected Chinese agent Christine Lee worked for Labour MP Barry Gardiner until Thursday. MI5, the UK's Security Service, has issued an alert warning MPs and Lords that they should avoid Christine Lee. The notice, seen by Insider, said she had "knowingly engaged in political interference activities" on behalf of the Chinese Communist Party. The Security Services have advised me that they have no intelligence that shows he was aware of, or complicit in, his mother's illegal activity." Footage uploaded to YouTube by the Chinese state broadcaster shows Lee, wearing blue, shaking hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at a May 2019 meeting of the China Overseas Friendship Association.
Persons: Christine Lee, Barry Gardiner, Lee, Theresa May, Christine Lee's, Daniel Wilkes, Gardiner, Jeremy Corbyn, Lindsay Hoyle, Tom Tugendhat, . Security Service Lee, May, Xi Jinping Organizations: Labour, Gardiner, Service, MI5, UK's Security Service, Chinese Communist Party, The Security Services, Times, Foreign, China Research Group, Parliamentarians, . Security Service, British Chinese, British, YouTube, China Overseas Friendship Association, Australian Strategic Policy Institute Locations: Gardiner, Hong Kong, China, Beijing
SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea on Tuesday fired what appeared to be a ballistic missile into its eastern sea, its second weapons launch in a week, the militaries of South Korea and Japan said. South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff said North Korea most likely fired a single ballistic missile from an inland area to its eastern sea, and that the South Korean and U.S. militaries were analyzing the launch. Japan’s Prime Minister’s Office and Defense Ministry said the North Korean weapon was possibly a ballistic missile, but didn’t immediately provide more details. The Biden administration has said it’s willing to resume talks with North Korea “anywhere and at any time” without preconditions. But North Korea has so far rejected the idea of open-ended talks, saying the U.S. must first withdraw its “hostile policy,” a term the North mainly uses to describe the sanctions and joint U.S.-South Korea military drills.
Persons: didn’t, Fumio Kishida, Kishida, Kim Dong, Kim, Donald Trump, Biden Organizations: South Korea’s, Chiefs, Staff, Korean, Minister’s Office, Defense Ministry, NBC, . Security, Guam Homeland Security, Civil Defense, North, University of North Korean Studies, South Korean, Seoul’s Defense, U.S Locations: SEOUL, South Korea, North Korea, Japan, Korea, United States, South, U.S, Guam, Pacific, Seoul, North
Share Share Article via Facebook Share Article via Twitter Share Article via LinkedIn Share Article via EmailBiden regards China, not Russia, as the core U.S. security challenge, says former diplomatTony Brenton, former U.K. ambassador to Russia, says that for the United States, getting entangled in a major confrontation with Russia makes dealing with China much more complicated.
Persons: Tony Brenton Organizations: Biden Locations: China, Russia, United States
U.N., U.S. condemn reported killing of civilians in Myanmar
  + stars: | 2021-12-29 | by ( ) www.nbcnews.com   time to read: +5 min
A senior U.N. official called on Myanmar authorities to investigate the reported killing of at least 35 civilians that opposition activists say was carried out by government soldiers, saying he was “horrified” at the violence. I condemn this grievous incident and all attacks against civilians throughout the country, which are prohibited under international humanitarian law,” he said in a statement. It suspended operations in Kayah State and parts of neighboring Karen State and the Magway region. Two residents and the Karenni Human Rights Group, which operates in the area, said soldiers had killed more than 30 civilians. Photographs posted by the rights group showed charred bodies, some in the back of a burned-out truck.
Persons: , Zaw Min Tun, Martin Griffiths, Fabrice Coffrini, Griffiths, Inger Ashing, Antony Blinken, Evelyn Hockstein, ” Blinken, , Suu Kyi, Karen State Organizations: Getty, NBC, . Security, AP, Human Rights Group, Reuters, State, Association for Assistance of Political Prisoners, Karen National Union Locations: Myanmar, Mo, Kayah State, AFP, Karen State, U.S, Burma, Suu, Sagaing, crackdowns, Karen
U.S. SEC says EDGAR back up after technical glitch
  + stars: | 2021-12-22 | by ( ) www.reuters.com   time to read: +1 min
The seal of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is seen at their headquarters in Washington, D.C., U.S., May 12, 2021. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly/File PhotoDec 22 (Reuters) - The U.S. Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) said on Wednesday its EDGAR system was back up and running after facing technical problems earlier in the day. EDGAR, or the Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval system, has a database of filings submitted by companies and others, which are required by law to file forms with the SEC. EDGAR is operating normally," a banner message on SEC's website read, as regulatory filings from companies trickled in. SEC did not elaborate on what had caused the issue.
Persons: Andrew Kelly, EDGAR, Nivedita Balu, Eva Mathews, Anil D'Silva Organizations: U.S . Securities, Exchange Commission, Washington , D.C, REUTERS, U.S . Security, SEC, Thomson Locations: Washington ,, Bengaluru
U.S. SEC says EDGAR facing technical problems
  + stars: | 2021-12-22 | by ( ) www.reuters.com   time to read: +1 min
The seal of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is seen at their headquarters in Washington, D.C., U.S., May 12, 2021. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly/File PhotoDec 22 (Reuters) - The U.S. Security and Exchange Commission (SEC) said on Wednesday its EDGAR system was facing technical problems. EDGAR, or the Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis, and Retrieval system, has a database of filings submitted by companies and others, which are required by law to file forms with the SEC. "The EDGAR system is currently experiencing technical difficulties," a banner message on SEC's website read. "EDGAR is not currently disseminating to (Public Dissemination Service) servers at this time, so PDS subscribers are not able to receive filings," SEC said in an email notification, adding it was investigating the issue.
Persons: Andrew Kelly, EDGAR, Nivedita Balu, Anil D'Silva Organizations: U.S . Securities, Exchange Commission, Washington , D.C, REUTERS, U.S . Security, SEC, Public, Service, Thomson Locations: Washington ,, Bengaluru
New wave of abuses alleged in Ethiopia's Tigray
  + stars: | 2021-12-16 | by ( The Associated Press | ) www.nbcnews.com   time to read: +4 min
The latest alleged abuses appear to be linked to the Tigray forces' recent momentum, which Ethiopia's government asserts has been blunted after the prime minister, a Nobel Peace Prize winner and former soldier, went to the battlefront himself. They let them go with nothing, while the young remained behind," one witness in Rawyan told the human rights groups. The United Nations has estimated that 20,000 people were recently evicted from western Tigray, most of them women, children and the elderly. The human rights groups are calling on Ethiopian authorities to end the attacks on civilians and immediately grant access to western Tigray for aid groups. "The global paralysis on Ethiopia's armed conflict has emboldened human rights abusers to act with impunity and left communities at risk of feeling abandoned," Human Rights Watch's Laetitia Bader said.
Persons: Amanuel Sileshi, Abiy Ahmed, Witnesses, Rawyan, It's, Muluneh, Billene Seyoum, Watch's Laetitia Bader Organizations: Human Rights Watch, Amnesty, Human, West, Getty, AP, Tigray, NBC, Amnesty International, United Nations, Human Rights, . Security Locations: Ethiopia's, Ethiopia, Kombolcha, AFP, Tigray, Amhara, Eritrea, Humera, Adebay
File photo of police officers as they stand in front of the Beehive during a Covid restriction and vaccine mandate protest at Parliament on November 09, 2021 in Wellington, New Zealand. Thousands marched in New Zealand's capital Wellington on Thursday to protest against Covid-19 vaccine mandates and lockdowns, as the country reached the 90% fully vaccinated milestone. The government has mandated vaccinations for teachers, workers in the health and disability sectors, police and other public service sectors. Protesters, mostly unmasked, marched through the central business district of Wellington and gathered in front of the parliament building, know as the Beehive. Security was beefed up at the Beehive with entrances closed off and dozens of police deployed.
Organizations: Covid, . Security Locations: Wellington , New Zealand, New Zealand's, Wellington
Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has gone to direct the war from the frontlines, state-affiliated media reported on Wednesday, as two Olympian athletes announced they were enlisting in the military. While Abiy is away, Deputy Prime Minister Demeke Mekonnen Hassen would take charge of routine government business in his absence, government spokesman Legesse Tulu told a news conference, according to a report from Fana news outlet. Ben Curtis / AP fileAbiy announced late on Monday he was planning to personally direct the fight against Tigrayan forces and their allies. Also on Wednesday, Switzerland and Britain advised their citizens to leave Ethiopia, citing the worsening security situation. France and the United States have already called on citizens to leave.
Persons: Abiy Ahmed, Haile Gebreselassie, Feyisa Lelisa, Abiy, Demeke Mekonnen, Legesse, Ben Curtis, “ Let’s, , Belete, Jeffrey Feltman, Feltman, Olusegun Obasanjo, Simon Coveney, Haile Gebrselassie, Minasse Wondimu, Ireland’s, “ We’ve, ” Dina Mufti Organizations: Ethiopia’s, Reuters, NBC, Ethiopian, Tiksa, Tuesday, Diplomats, Irish, Anadolu Agency, Getty, . Security, Ireland’s RTE, Ethiopian Ministry of Foreign Affairs Locations: Fana, Agula, Mekele, Tigray, Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, Djibouti, Tigray People's, Tiksa Negeri, Jan, Ireland, “ Ireland, Switzerland, France, United States
US President Joe Biden stressed "just simple, straightforward competition" with China. Chinese President Xi Jinping said the two sides must increase communication and cooperation. The U.S. president smiled broadly as the Chinese president appeared on a large screen in the conference room. Biden and Xi have not had a face-to-face meeting since Biden became president and the last time they spoke it was via telephone in September. The White House has declined to answer questions on whether the United States will send officials to the Beijing Winter Olympics in February.
Persons: Joe Biden, Xi Jinping, Biden, Xi, Scott Kennedy, Zhao Lijian, Communist Party's, Biden's, Bill Hagerty, Donald Trump Organizations: Service, . Security Council, U.S, Beijing, Olympics, Games, Washington's Center, Strategic, International Studies, Communist Party, Foreign, Congress, China, Pentagon Locations: China, United States, Taiwan, U.S, Beijing, Washington, Communist, Russia, Japan
Calling Biden an "old friend," Xi said the two sides must increase communication and cooperation to solve the many challenges they face. Biden previously disputed the characterization here of their relationship as an old friendship. The U.S. president smiled broadly as the Chinese president appeared on a large screen in the conference room. Biden and Xi have not had a face-to-face meeting since Biden became president and the last time they spoke it was via telephone in September. The White House has declined to answer questions on whether the United States will send officials to the Beijing Winter Olympics in February.
Persons: Joe Biden, Xi Jinping, ” Biden, Biden, Xi, , Scott Kennedy, Zhao Lijian, Communist Party’s, Biden’s, Bill Hagerty, Donald Trump Organizations: WASHINGTON, . Security Council, U.S, Beijing, Olympics, Games, Washington’s Center, Strategic, International Studies, Communist Party, Foreign, Congress, China, Pentagon Locations: China, United States, Taiwan, U.S, Beijing, Washington, Communist, ” Taiwan, Russia, Japan
Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko attends a meeting with his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia September 9, 2021. Mikhail Voskresensky | Kremlin Sputnik | via ReutersBelarus has threatened to cut off its transit of gas supply to Europe if the EU imposes sanctions over a migrant crisis at its western border. Reports suggest that Belavia could be in line for EU sanctions, and questions have also been raised as to whether they could broaden to hit Russia's Aeroflot or Turkish Airlines. "It would also give him a pretext to formally intervene in Belarus itself — Russian planes already seem to be patrolling now to secure Belarus borders with NATO." BELARUS, Nov. 12 - Thousands of irregular migrants are facing desperate conditions as they continue waiting at the Polish-Belarusian border, hoping to cross onto EU soil.
Persons: Alexander Lukashenko, Vladimir Putin, Mikhail Voskresensky, Lukashenko, they'll, Timothy Ash, Putin, Ash Organizations: Kremlin, Sputnik, Reuters, Belavia, Aeroflot, Turkish Airlines, . Security, U.S, Bluebay Asset Management, NATO, Stringer, Anadolu Agency, Getty Locations: Moscow, Russia, Reuters Belarus, Europe, Russian, Poland, Belarus, Syria, Yemen, Iraq, Belarusian, Turkey, Albania, BELARUS
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